Woody Wagenhorst

Last updated
Woody Wagenhorst
Biographical details
Born(1863-06-03)June 3, 1863
Gouldsboro, Pennsylvania
DiedFebruary 12, 1946(1946-02-12) (aged 82)
Washington, D.C.
Playing career
Football
18861887 Princeton
1888 Penn
Baseball
1888 Philadelphia Quakers
1889 Minneapolis Millers
1889 St. Paul Apostles
1890–1891 Penn
Position(s) End (football)
Third baseman (baseball)
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1888–1891 Penn
Head coaching record
Overall39–18
Woody Wagenhorst
Born:(1863-06-03)June 3, 1863
Gouldsboro, Pennsylvania
Died: February 12, 1946(1946-02-12) (aged 82)
Washington, D.C.
Batted: LeftThrew: Unknown
MLB debut
June 25,  1888, for the  Philadelphia Quakers
Last MLB appearance
June 25,  1888, for the  Philadelphia Quakers
MLB statistics
Games2
At bats8
Hits 1
Teams

Elwood Otto "Woody" Wagenhorst (June 3, 1863 – February 12, 1946) was an American football and baseball player and coach. He played Major League Baseball as a third baseman for the Philadelphia Quakers in 1888. In two career games, he had one hit in eight at-bats. [1] Wagenhorst served as the head football coach at the University of Pennsylvania from 1888 to 1891, compiling a record of 39–18.

Contents

Biography

Wagenhorst was born in Gouldsboro, Pennsylvania in 1863. He played baseball and football while attending Princeton University (then known as the College of New Jersey). At the time of his graduation from Princeton, on June 8, 1888, he debuted at third base for the Philadelphia Quakers in the National League. After playing in only two games, Wagenhorst soon accepted an invitation to become coach of Penn's second paid football team, succeeding Frank Dole. For his coaching duties, Wagenhorst was paid $275. [2]

In the fall of 1888 as Wagenhorst served the Penn football team as its coach, trainer and he even played end briefly that season. In 1889, while coaching at Penn, Wagenhorst enrolled in Law School. As a Penn law student, Wagenhorst also became third-baseman and captain of the school's 1890 and 1891 baseball teams.

After graduating in 1892, he became a private secretary for Republican member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Pennsylvania and later Mayor of Philadelphia, John E. Reyburn. Wagenhorst later practiced law in Washington D. C. until his death in 1946. [3]

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Penn Quakers (Independent)(1888–1891)
1888 Penn 10–7
1889 Penn 7–6
1890 Penn 11–3
1891 Penn 11–2
Penn:39–18
Total:39–18

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The 1891 Penn Quakers football team represented the University of Pennsylvania in the 1891 college football season. The Quakers finished with an 11–2 record in their fourth year under head coach E. O. Wagenhorst. Significant games included victories over Rutgers (32–6), Lafayette, and Lehigh, and losses to Princeton (24–0) and undefeated national champion Yale (48–0). The 1891 Penn team outscored its opponents by a combined total of 267 to 109. Penn center John Adams was selected by Caspar Whitney as a first-team player on the 1891 College Football All-America Team.

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The 1888 Penn Quakers football team was an American football team that represented the University of Pennsylvania during the 1888 college football season. In its first season under head coach Woody Wagenhorst, the team compiled a 9–7 record and outscored opponents by a total of to. Halfback Tom Hulme was the team captain. The team played its home games at the University Athletic Grounds located at 37th and Spruce Streets.

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