Worksop

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Worksop
Approaching Worksop Town Lock - geograph.org.uk - 453354.jpg
Approaching Worksop Town Lock
Nottinghamshire UK location map.svg
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Worksop
Location within Nottinghamshire
Population41,820  [1]
Demonym Worksopian
OS grid reference SK 58338 78967
District
Shire county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town WORKSOP
Postcode district S80, S81
Dialling code 01909
Police Nottinghamshire
Fire Nottinghamshire
Ambulance East Midlands
EU Parliament East Midlands
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Nottinghamshire
53°18′15″N1°07′28″W / 53.30417°N 1.12444°W / 53.30417; -1.12444 Coordinates: 53°18′15″N1°07′28″W / 53.30417°N 1.12444°W / 53.30417; -1.12444

Worksop ( /ˈwɜːrksɒp/ WURK-sop) is the largest town in the Bassetlaw district of Nottinghamshire, England. Worksop lies on the River Ryton, and is located at the northern edge of Sherwood Forest. Worksop is located 19 miles (31 km) east-south-east of Sheffield, with a population of 41,820. [2] It lies close to Nottinghamshire’s borders with South Yorkshire, and Derbyshire.

Bassetlaw District District in England

Bassetlaw is the northernmost district of Nottinghamshire, England, with a population of 114,143 according to the mid-2014 estimate by the Office for National Statistics. The borough is predominantly rural, with two towns: Worksop, site of the borough council offices, and Retford. The district was formed on 1 April 1974 by the merger of the boroughs of Worksop and East Retford and most of Worksop Rural District and most of East Retford Rural District. It is named after the historic Bassetlaw wapentake of Nottinghamshire.

Nottinghamshire County of England

Nottinghamshire is a county in the East Midlands region of England, bordering South Yorkshire to the north-west, Lincolnshire to the east, Leicestershire to the south, and Derbyshire to the west. The traditional county town is Nottingham, though the county council is based at County Hall in West Bridgford in the borough of Rushcliffe, at a site facing Nottingham over the River Trent.

Contents

Worksop has become a commuter town as a result of its geographic location and ease of access to major motorways and rail links.

Worksop is known as the "Gateway to The Dukeries", because of the now four obsolete ducal principal sites of which were closely located next to each other, south of the town. These four ducal locations were; Clumber House, Thoresby Hall, Welbeck Abbey and Worksop Manor. Other houses such as Rufford Abbey and Hodsock Priory are also just a few miles away

The Dukeries

The Dukeries is an area of the county of Nottinghamshire so called because it contained four ducal seats. It is south of Worksop, which has been called its "gateway". The ducal seats were:

A duke (male) or duchess (female) can either be a monarch ruling over a duchy or a member of royalty or nobility, historically of highest rank below the monarch and princes of nobility. The title comes from French duc, itself from the Latin dux, 'leader', a term used in republican Rome to refer to a military commander without an official rank, and later coming to mean the leading military commander of a province.

Thoresby Hall Grade I listed hotel in Newark and Sherwood, United Kingdom

Thoresby Hall is a grade I listed 19th-century country house in Budby, Nottinghamshire, some 2 miles north of Ollerton. It is one of four neighbouring country houses and estates in the Dukeries in north Nottinghamshire all occupied by dukes at one time during their history. The hall is constructed of rock-faced ashlar with ashlar dressings. It is built in four storeys with a square floor plan surrounding a central courtyard, nine bays wide and eight bays deep.

Worksop is twinned with the German town Garbsen.

History

Evidence that Worksop existed before the Norman conquest of England in 1066 is provided by the Domesday Book of 1086:

Norman conquest of England 11th-century invasion and conquest of England by Normans

The Norman Conquest of England was the 11th-century invasion and occupation of England by an army of Norman, Breton, Flemish, and French soldiers led by the Duke of Normandy, later styled William the Conqueror.

Domesday Book 11th-century survey of landholding in England as well as the surviving manuscripts of the survey

Domesday Book is a manuscript record of the "Great Survey" of much of England and parts of Wales completed in 1086 by order of King William the Conqueror. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle states:

Then, at the midwinter [1085], was the king in Gloucester with his council .... After this had the king a large meeting, and very deep consultation with his council, about this land; how it was occupied, and by what sort of men. Then sent he his men over all England into each shire; commissioning them to find out "How many hundreds of hides were in the shire, what land the king himself had, and what stock upon the land; or, what dues he ought to have by the year from the shire."

"In Werchesope, (Worksop) Elsi (son of Caschin) had three carucates of land to be taxed. Land to eight ploughs. Roger has one plough in the demesne there, and twenty-two sokemen who hold twelve oxgangs of this land, and twenty-four villanes and eight bordars having twenty-two ploughs, and seven acres of meadow. Wood pasture two miles long, and three quarentens broad." [3]

In about 1103, William de Lovetot established a castle and the Augustinian priory at Worksop. Subsequently, Worksop grew into a market town.

William de Lovetot, Lord of Hallamshire, possibly descended from the Norman Baron Ricardus Surdus, was an Anglo-Norman Baron from Huntingdonshire, often credited as the founder of Sheffield, England.

Castle Fortified residential structure of medieval Europe

A castle is a type of fortified structure built during the Middle Ages predominantly by the nobility or royalty and by military orders. Scholars debate the scope of the word castle, but usually consider it to be the private fortified residence of a lord or noble. This is distinct from a palace, which is not fortified; from a fortress, which was not always a residence for royalty or nobility; and from a fortified settlement, which was a public defence – though there are many similarities among these types of construction. Usage of the term has varied over time and has been applied to structures as diverse as hill forts and country houses. Over the approximately 900 years that castles were built, they took on a great many forms with many different features, although some, such as curtain walls, arrowslits, and portcullises, were commonplace.

Worksop Priory Church

Worksop Priory is a Church of England parish church and former priory in the town of Worksop, Nottinghamshire, part of the Diocese of Southwell and Nottingham and under the episcopal care of the Bishop of Beverley.

A skirmish occurred in the area during the Wars of the Roses on 16 December 1460, commonly known as the Battle of Worksop.

Wars of the Roses Dynastic civil war in England during the 15th-century

The Wars of the Roses were a series of English civil wars for control of the throne of England fought between supporters of two rival branches of the royal House of Plantagenet: the House of Lancaster, associated with a red rose, and the House of York, whose symbol was a white rose. Eventually, the wars eliminated the male lines of both families. The conflict lasted through many sporadic episodes between 1455 and 1487, but there was related fighting before and after this period between the parties. The power struggle ignited around social and financial troubles following the Hundred Years' War, unfolding the structural problems of feudalism, combined with the mental infirmity and weak rule of King Henry VI which revived interest in Richard of York's claim to the throne. Historians disagree on which of these factors to identify as the main reason for the wars.

Battle of Worksop Skirmish during the Wars of the Roses

Battle of Worksop was a skirmish during the Wars of the Roses, near the town of Worksop, Nottinghamshire on 16 December 1460, part of the campaign which led to the Battle of Wakefield on 30 December.

The building of the Chesterfield Canal in 1777, and the subsequent construction of the Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway in 1849, both of which passed through the settlement, led to a degree of growth. Discovery of sizeable coal seams further increased interest in the area.

Chesterfield Canal

The Chesterfield Canal is a narrow canal in the East Midlands of England and it is known locally as 'Cuckoo Dyke'. It was one of the last of the canals designed by James Brindley, who died while it was being constructed. It was opened in 1777 and ran for 46 miles (74 km) from the River Trent at West Stockwith, Nottinghamshire to Chesterfield, Derbyshire, passing through the Norwood Tunnel at Kiveton Park, at the time one of the longest tunnels on the British canal system. The canal was built to export coal, limestone, and lead from Derbyshire, iron from Chesterfield, and corn, deals, timber, groceries and general merchandise into Derbyshire. The stone for the Palace of Westminster was quarried in North Anston, Rotherham, and transported via the canal.

Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway

The Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway (MS&LR) was formed by amalgamation in 1847. The MS&LR changed its name to the Great Central Railway in 1897 in anticipation of the opening in 1899 of its London Extension.

Coal A combustible sedimentary rock composed primarily of carbon

Coal is a combustible black or brownish-black sedimentary rock, formed as rock strata called coal seams. Coal is mostly carbon with variable amounts of other elements; chiefly hydrogen, sulfur, oxygen, and nitrogen. Coal is formed if dead plant matter decays into peat and over millions of years the heat and pressure of deep burial converts the peat into coal. Vast deposits of coal originates in former wetlands—called coal forests—that covered much of the Earth's tropical land areas during the late Carboniferous (Pennsylvanian) and Permian times.

Coal mining provided thousands of jobs in and around Worksop for most of the 19th and 20th centuries, but by the 1990s the pits had closed, resulting in high local unemployment. Drug abuse in the area also soared. [4]

Unemployment levels in the area are now lower than the national average, owing to large number of distribution and local manufacturing companies, including Premier Foods, Wilko, RDS Transport, Pandrol UK Ltd and Laing O'Rourke.

Transport

Worksop lies on the A57 and A60 with links to the A1 and M1.

Worksop is on the Sheffield-Lincoln line, with direct services running to Sheffield, Leeds and Lincoln. Services call at Retford, Gainsborough, Saxilby, Shireoaks, Kiveton Park, Kiveton Bridge, Woodhouse, Darnall, Meadowhall, Barnsley and Wakefield. These services are run by Northern. Worksop is also the terminus of the Robin Hood line to Nottingham via Mansfield, a service run by East Midlands Railway. On Saturdays Northern also runs three services to Grimsby and Cleethorpes via Gainsborough.

Bus services provided by Stagecoach East Midlands operate in the town to Doncaster, Shireoaks, Langold, Harworth, Bawtry, Retford, Blyth, Bircotes, Clowne, Tickhill, Chesterfield, Ollerton, and Nottingham, Stagecoach also run internal services within Worksop.

Education

Primary

Secondary

Further education

Healthcare

Worksop is served by Bassetlaw District General Hospital, part of the Doncaster and Bassetlaw NHS Foundation Trust. Bassetlaw Hospital treats ~33,000 people each year, as well as ~38,000 emergencies. Bassetlaw Hospital is one of the University of Sheffield Teaching hospitals Medical School.

Mental Health services in Worksop are provided by Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust who provide both in-patient and community services. Wards run by Nottinghamshire Healthcare provide training for medical students at the University of Nottingham.

Local economy

The local economy in Worksop is dominated by service industries, manufacturing and distribution.

Major employers in the area include Premier Foods, Greencore, Wilko UK headquarters and distribution centre, RDS Transport (the Flying Fridge), B&Q distribution centre, MAKE polymers, [6] OCG Cacao, part of Cargill, Pandrol, GCHQ and the NHS (Doncaster and Bassetlaw NHS Trust and Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Trust).

Religion

St Anne's Church St Anne's Church, Worksop - geograph.org.uk - 106073.jpg
St Anne's Church

Worksop has three churches which are all on the National Heritage List for England.

Officially titled the Priory Church of Saint Mary and Saint Cuthbert, is the Anglican parish church usually known as Worksop Priory. It was an Augustinian Priory founded in 1103. The church has a nave and detached gatehouse. Monks at the priory made the Tickhill Psalter, an illuminated manuscripts of the medieval period, now held in New York Public Library. After the dissolution of the Monasteries the east end of the church fell into disrepair, but the townspeople were granted the nave as a parish church. The eastern parts of the building have been restored in several phases, the most recent being in the 1970s when the architect Lawrence King rebuilt the crossing.

St. Anne's Church is an Anglican parish church and is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade II listed building. [7] The church was built in 1911 by the Lancaster architects Austin and Paley. [8] [9] The church has an historic pipe organ originally built by Gray and Davison in 1852 for Clapham Congregational Church.

St. John's Church is a Parish church built between 1867 and 1868 by architect Robert Clarke.

Places of interest

Mr Straw's House, the family home of the Straw family, was inherited by the Straw brothers, William and Walter when their parents died in the 1930s. The house remained unaltered until the National Trust acquired it in the 1990s and opened it to the public. [10] Clumber Park, south of Worksop is a country park, also owned by the National Trust, and is open to the public.

Notable people

Related Research Articles

Blyth, Nottinghamshire village and civil parish in United Kingdom

Blyth is a village and civil parish in the Bassetlaw district of the county of Nottinghamshire, in the East Midlands, north west of East Retford, on the River Ryton. The population of the civil parish as of the 2011 census is 1,233. It sits at a junction with the A1, and the end of the motorway section from Doncaster.

Anston civil parish in Rotherham, South Yorkshire, England

Anston is a civil parish in South Yorkshire, England, formally known as North and South Anston. The parish consists of the settlements of North Anston and South Anston, divided by the Anston Brook.

Tickhill town in Tickhill, United Kindom

Tickhill is a town and civil parish in the Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster in South Yorkshire, England, on the border with Nottinghamshire. It has a population of 5,301, reducing to 5,228 at the 2011 Census.

Kiveton Park village in the Metropolitan Borough of Rotherham in South Yorkshire, England, United Kingdom

Kiveton Park, informally Kiveton, is a village within the Metropolitan Borough of Rotherham, in South Yorkshire, England. Historically a part of the West Riding of Yorkshire, from the Norman conquest to 1868, Kiveton was a hamlet of the parish of Harthill-with-Woodall. It subsequently transferred to the civil parish of Wales which takes its name from the neighbouring village.

Clumber Park estate in Worksop, Nottinghamshire, England

Clumber Park is a country park in The Dukeries near Worksop in Nottinghamshire, England. The estate, which was the seat of the Pelham-Clintons, Dukes of Newcastle, was purchased by the National Trust in 1946. It is listed Grade I on the Register of Historic Parks and Gardens.

Harworth village in United Kingdom

Harworth is a small town in the county of Nottinghamshire, East Midlands of England. It is approximately 8 miles (13 km) north of Worksop. Together with the neighbouring mining town of Bircotes, it forms the civil parish of Harworth and Bircotes, with a combined population of nearly 8,000 residents. The population of the civil parish was measured at 7,948 in the 2011 Census. The settlements are part of the modern district of Bassetlaw, which combined the district of Worksop and the district of Retford.

Sheffield–Lincoln line railway line in England

The Sheffield–Lincoln line is a railway line in England. It runs from Sheffield east to Lincoln via Worksop, Retford and Gainsborough Lea Road. The route comprises the main line of the former Manchester, Sheffield and Lincolnshire Railway (MS&LR), to Gainsborough Trent Junction, where it then follows the former Great Northern and Great Eastern Joint Railway (GNGEJR) to Lincoln Central. The former MS&LR main line continues from Trent Junction to Wrawby Junction, Barnetby, much of it now single line, where it then runs to Cleethorpes.

Rhodesia, Nottinghamshire village in United Kingdom

Rhodesia is a village and civil parish located in the county of Nottinghamshire in England. The population of the civil parish was 982 at the 2011 census. The village lies just outside the town of Worksop in the district of Bassetlaw and lies approximately 20 miles from Sheffield. It was named after the erstwhile chairman of the nearby Shireoaks Colliery, G. Preston Rhodes.

Shireoaks village in United Kingdom

Shireoaks is a former pit village and civil parish in Nottinghamshire, located between Worksop and Thorpe Salvin on the border with South Yorkshire. The population of the civil parish was 1,432 at the 2011 census. Shireoaks colliery was opened in 1854. It was closed on 25 May 1991 and was capped in August 1992. The depth of the shaft was 483.5m and the shaft's diameter was 3.66m.

Worksop Manor Building in Britain

Worksop Manor is a Grade I listed 18th-century country house in Bassetlaw, Nottinghamshire. It stands in one of the four contiguous estates in the Dukeries area of Nottinghamshire. Traditionally, the Lord of the Manor of Worksop may assist a British monarch at his or her coronation by providing a glove and putting it on the monarch's right hand and supporting his or her right arm. Worksop Manor was the seat of the ancient Lords of Worksop.

Bassetlaw District General Hospital Hospital in Nottinghamshire, England

Bassetlaw District General Hospital is a National Health Service hospital in Worksop, Nottinghamshire. It is managed by the Doncaster and Bassetlaw Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.

Carlton in Lindrick village in the United Kingdom

Carlton in Lindrick is a village and civil parish about 3 miles (5 km) north of Worksop in Nottinghamshire, England. The 2011 Census recorded a parish population of 5,623.

Shireoaks Hall

Shireoaks Hall is a grade II* listed 17th-century country house in the hamlet of Shireoaks, 2 14 miles (3.6 km) north-west of Worksop, Nottinghamshire, UK.

Doncaster and Bassetlaw Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust was established in 2004. It runs services at Bassetlaw District General Hospital, Doncaster Royal Infirmary, Montagu Hospital and Retford Hospital, in Nottinghamshire and South Yorkshire, England.

Nottinghamshire Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust, based in Nottinghamshire, England, manages the high security Rampton Hospital near Retford, two medium secure units, Arnold Lodge in Leicester and Wathwood Hospital in Rotherham, and a low Secure Unit, Wells Road Centre at Mapperley in Nottingham.

St Lukes Church, Shireoaks Church in Shireoaks, England

St Luke's Church, Shireoaks is a Grade II listed Church of England parish church in Shireoaks, Nottinghamshire.

References

Notes

  1. "WORKSOP in Nottinghamshire (East Midlands)".
  2. citypopulation.info
  3. White, Robert (1875) Worksop, The Dukery, and Sherwood Forest. Transcription at Nicholson, AP: Nottinghamshire History (Accessed 24 December 2005).
  4. Boniface, Susie (24 October 2010). "George Osborne wreaks havoc .. just like Margaret Thatcher in 1980s". The Mirror.
  5. "Worksop Priory C of E Primary Academy". Nottinghamshire County Council. Retrieved 23 May 2018.
  6. "Site confirmed for MBA Polymers' UK plant". Recycling International. Archived from the original on 11 June 2016. Retrieved 12 April 2014.
  7. Historic England, "Church of St Anne, Worksop (1045754)", National Heritage List for England , retrieved 30 August 2012
  8. Pevsner 1979, p. 389.
  9. Brandwood et al. 2012, p. 248.
  10. Mr Straw's House Archived 8 May 2006 at the Wayback Machine by The National Trust, accessed 28 May 2006.
  11. "James Walsham Baldock". www.avictorian.com. Retrieved 14 January 2019.
  12. "VIDEO AND PICTURES: Sheffield internet star makes suit out of BREAD and then feeds himself to ducks". www.thestar.co.uk. Retrieved 18 February 2019.

Sources