World Movement of Christian Workers

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The World Movement of Christian Workers (Mouvement Mondial des Travailleurs Chrétiens) is the Catholic Church's officially recognized association for Catholic workingmen and women. It is a member organization of Vatican's Conference of International Catholic Organizations. The World Movement of Christian Workers (WMCW/MMTC) does not have individual members but is a federation of various national movements. [1] The affiliate in the United States is the Catholic Labor Network. [2] In the UK, it is the Movement of Christian Workers. [3]

WMCW/MMTC activities are educational and evangelistic. The Movement bases its commitment on faith in Jesus Christ, the Gospel and the social teaching of the Catholic Church. It is committed to working together with others - regardless of race, culture or creed - to improve their living conditions and build up a society without exclusions. The approach used by the Movement is based on the method developed by Joseph Cardijn to "see-judge-act".

Catholic Church Largest Christian church, led by the Bishop of Rome

The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with approximately 1.3 billion baptised Catholics worldwide as of 2017. As the world's oldest continuously functioning international institution, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation. The church is headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the pope. Its central administration, the Holy See, is in the Vatican City, an enclave within the city of Rome in Italy.

Joseph Cardijn Belgian Roman Catholic cardinal and founder of the Young Christian Workers

Joseph Leo Cardijn was a Belgian Roman Catholic cardinal and the founder of the Young Christian Workers. Cardijn was best known for his lifelong dedication to social activism and working towards the improvement of the working class; since his ordination he made a particular focus of his life the effort to evangelize and bring the core messages of faith in the Gospel back to the working class whom he believed were neglected. He was not wrong in that assessment since old schoolmates working in the mines and mills believed the Church had abandoned them which prompted Cardijn to found a social movement dedicated to this task despite the opposition that it faced.

The world headquarters of the Movement is in Brussels, Belgium. French is the working language of the headquarters.

Brussels Capital region of Belgium

Brussels, officially the Brussels-Capital Region, is a region of Belgium comprising 19 municipalities, including the City of Brussels, which is the capital of Belgium. The Brussels-Capital Region is located in the central portion of the country and is a part of both the French Community of Belgium and the Flemish Community, but is separate from the Flemish Region and the Walloon Region. Brussels is the most densely populated and the richest region in Belgium in terms of GDP per capita. It covers 161 km2 (62 sq mi), a relatively small area compared to the two other regions, and has a population of 1.2 million. The metropolitan area of Brussels counts over 2.1 million people, which makes it the largest in Belgium. It is also part of a large conurbation extending towards Ghent, Antwerp, Leuven and Walloon Brabant, home to over 5 million people.

French language Romance language

French is a Romance language of the Indo-European family. It descended from the Vulgar Latin of the Roman Empire, as did all Romance languages. French evolved from Gallo-Romance, the spoken Latin in Gaul, and more specifically in Northern Gaul. Its closest relatives are the other langues d'oïl—languages historically spoken in northern France and in southern Belgium, which French (Francien) has largely supplanted. French was also influenced by native Celtic languages of Northern Roman Gaul like Gallia Belgica and by the (Germanic) Frankish language of the post-Roman Frankish invaders. Today, owing to France's past overseas expansion, there are numerous French-based creole languages, most notably Haitian Creole. A French-speaking person or nation may be referred to as Francophone in both English and French.

History

Prior to World War II, in many European countries there developed different labor federations for Catholics, Socialists, Communists and liberals. All of these unions were abolished by the Nazi or other Right-Wing regimes in Axis Europe. The Vatican and others believed this division in the labor movement weakened its ability to defeat Nazism and other Right Wing totalitarian movements. After World War II, the Vatican discouraged re-formation of "Christian trade unions" (i.e. Catholic aligned labor unions) although it was not always successful. [4] As an alternative to Catholic-based unions that negotiated contracts and represented workers to management, Christian worker associations were created as an educational, spiritual and social action movement rather than as a specific labor union. In the 1950s, the Catholic workers’ associations of Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Switzerland and the Netherlands decided to join forces to create an international structure to encourage exchanges and knowledge between individuals and different situations; to stimulate solidarity between workers’ movements; to foster the spread of Christian workers’ movements in the world; and to develop the apostolate in the labor world. In 1966, to coincide with the 75th anniversary of Rerum Novarum, it was given official recognition by the Holy See. [5]

A trade union is an association of workers forming a legal unit or legal personhood, usually called a "bargaining unit", which acts as bargaining agent and legal representative for a unit of employees in all matters of law or right arising from or in the administration of a collective agreement. Labour unions typically fund the formal organization, head office, and legal team functions of the labour union through regular fees or union dues. The delegate staff of the labour union representation in the workforce are made up of workplace volunteers who are appointed by members in democratic elections.

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References

  1. "Directory of associations". www.laici.va.
  2. "The Catholic Labor Network – Washington, DC". catholiclabor.org.
  3. "Home". mcworkers.org.
  4. Oubre, Fr. Sinclair. "Foundations of Catholic Trade Unions in Europe". classic.catholiclabor.org.
  5. "Movimiento Mundial de Trabajadores Cristianos - Inicio". mmtc-infor.com.