Wuhan Institute of Virology

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Wuhan Institute of Virology
中国科学院武汉病毒研究所
Wuhan Institute of Virology logo.png
Wuhan Institute of Virology main entrance.jpg
AbbreviationWIV
Predecessor
  • Wuhan Microbiology Laboratory
  • South China Institute of Microbiology
  • Wuhan Microbiology Institute
  • Microbiology Institute of Hubei Province
Formation1956
FounderChen Huagui, Gao Shangyin
HeadquartersXiaohongshan, Wuchang District, Wuhan, Hubei, China
Coordinates 30°22′35″N114°15′45″E / 30.37639°N 114.26250°E / 30.37639; 114.26250 Coordinates: 30°22′35″N114°15′45″E / 30.37639°N 114.26250°E / 30.37639; 114.26250
Director-General
Wang Yanyi
Secretary of Party Committee
Xiao Gengfu [1]
Deputy Director-General
Gong Peng, Guan Wuxiang, Xiao Gengfu
Parent organization
Chinese Academy of Sciences
Website whiov.cas.cn
  1. As of February 2017, there were already two BSL-4 labs in Taiwan. [4]

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DRASTIC is a loose collection of internet activists investigating the origins of COVID-19, in particular the lab leak theory. DRASTIC is composed of about 30 core members, whose activity is primarily organized through the social media website Twitter. They formed in February 2020, at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. DRASTIC members have called for a "full and unrestricted investigation" into the origins of COVID-19, conducted independently of the World Health Organization. Most scientists think that COVID-19 likely had a natural origin, and some have considered that a potential lab leak is worth investigating.

China COVID-19 cover-up refers to the efforts of the Government of China and the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) to hide information about the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic and the origins of SARS-CoV-2. Since the beginning of the pandemic, the Chinese government has made efforts to obscure the initial outbreak of the disease, clamp down on domestic debate or dissent about it, hinder further research into its origins, and spread false counter-narratives about the virus. The Chinese government has stated that no cover-up regarding the COVID-19 outbreak has taken place.

References

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  56. See, for example, the following:
  57. "Administration". Wuhan Institute of Virology, CAS. Archived from the original on 29 July 2019. Retrieved 26 January 2020.
Wuhan Institute of Virology
Simplified Chinese 中国 科学院 武汉 病毒 研究所
Traditional Chinese 中國科學院武漢病毒研究所