Xiang Xiang (giant panda)

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Xiang Xiang climbing a tree at the China Conservation and Research Center for the Giant Panda in Wolong National Nature Reserve in China's southwestern Sichuan province in 2006 Xiang Xiang panda.jpg
Xiang Xiang climbing a tree at the China Conservation and Research Center for the Giant Panda in Wolong National Nature Reserve in China's southwestern Sichuan province in 2006

Xiang Xiang (Chinese :祥祥; pinyin :Xiáng Xiang; August 25, 2001 [1] – February 19, 2007) was the first giant panda to be released into the wild after being bred and raised in captivity. [2] Born at the Wolong Giant Panda Research Center in the Sichuan Province, Xiang Xiang endured a three-year training regimen intended to equip him with the skills necessary to survive in the wild. [3] Fitted with a radio-collar upon his release in April 2006, the five-year-old male was tracked each month to check his movements and feeding habits. [4] Despite this extensive preparation, Xiang Xiang was found dead less than a year after his release. The Xinhua News Agency announced the panda's death May 31, 2007, over three months after the incident occurred, citing "the need for a full investigation" [5] as the reason for the delay. Officials from the Research Center determined that a fall from the trees was the probable cause of death. Scratches on Xiang Xiang's body suggest that he was probably being pursued by other pandas when he fell. [6]

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References

  1. "China releases panda to the wild". BBC. 2006-04-28. Retrieved 2007-08-04.
  2. "First Panda Freed Into Wild Found Dead". National Geographic News. 2007-05-31.
  3. "Human-raised giant panda able to survive in wild". 2006-02-09. Retrieved 2007-08-04.
  4. Horstman, Mark (October 5, 2006). Panda Pioneer (.asx/.ram). ABC . Retrieved 2007-08-04.
  5. "Artificially bred China panda dies in the wild". The Sydney Morning Herald. 2007-05-31. Retrieved 2012-07-18.
  6. "Panda that was released into wild dies". NBC News. 2007-05-31. Retrieved 2007-08-04.