Xuanwumen (Beijing)

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Xuanwumen (simplified Chinese :宣武门; traditional Chinese :宣武門; pinyin :Xuānwǔmén; Manchu:ᡥᠣᡵᠣᠨ
ᠪᡝ
ᠠᠯᡤᡳᠮᠪᡠᡵᡝ
ᡩᡠᡴᠠ
;Möllendorff:horon be algimbure duka [1] ;lit.the gate of military might}});Möllendorff:tob dergi duka; lit. "Gate of the declaration of power"), was a gate in Beijing's former city wall. In the 1960s, the gate was torn down during the construction of the city's subway. Today, Xuanwumen is a transport node in Beijing as well as the location of Xuanwumen Station on Line 2 and Line 4 of the Beijing Subway. [2]

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Xuanwumen or Xuanwu Gate may refer to:

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References

  1. 《滿蒙漢合璧教科書》第5冊第38課 「京師」 / 『ᠮᠠᠨᠵᡠ ᠮᠣᠩᡤᠣ ᠨᡳᡴᠠᠨ ᡳᠯᠠᠨ ᠠᠴᠠᠩᡤᠠ ᡧᡠ ᡳ ᡨᠠᠴᡳᠪᡠᡵᡝ ᡥᠠᠴᡳᠨ ᡳ ᠪᡳᡨᡥᡝ』 ᠰᡠᠨᠵᠠᠴᡳ ᡩᡝᠪᡨᡝᠯᡳᠨ᠈ ᡤᡡᠰᡳᠨ ᠵᠠᡴᡡᠴᡳ ᡴᡳᠴᡝᠨ᠈ 「ᡤᡝᠮᡠᠨ ᡥᡝᠴᡝᠨ」
  2. http://www.ebeijing.gov.cn/feature_2/BeijingSubway/TransferStation/Xuanwumen/index.htm

Coordinates: 39°53′59″N116°22′27″E / 39.8997°N 116.3743°E / 39.8997; 116.3743