Yakmesi

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Yakmesi
Monarch of Aššūrāyu
Reign fl. c. 2140 BCE — fl. c. 2127 BCE
Predecessor Ilu-Mer
Successor Yakmeni
Father Ilu-Mer

Yakmesi (Akkadian : 𒅀𒀝𒈨𒋛, romanized: Ia-ak-me-si) had been the twenty-second Assyrian monarch of the Early Period of Aššūrāyu (Assyria) according to the Assyrian King List (AKL). Yakmesi is listed within a section of the AKL as the sixth out of the ten, "kings whose fathers are known". This section (which in contrast to the rest of the list) had been written in reverse order—beginning with Aminu and ending with Apiashal “altogether ten kings who are ancestors" [1] [2] "—and has often been interpreted as the list of ancestors of the Amorite Šamši-Adad I ( fl. c. 1809 BCE) [2] who had conquered the city-state of Aššur . [3] The AKL also states that Yakmesi had been both the son and successor of Ilu-Mer . Additionally, the AKL states that Yakmesi had been both the predecessor and father of Yakmeni .

Akkadian language extinct Semitic language

Akkadian is an extinct East Semitic language that was spoken in ancient Mesopotamia from the third millennium BC until its gradual replacement by Akkadian-influenced Old Aramaic among Mesopotamians by the eighth century BC.

Assyrian people Ethnic group indigenous to the Near East

Assyrians are a Semitic ethnic group indigenous to Assyria, a region in the Middle East. Some self-identify as Syriacs, Arameans, and Chaldeans. Speakers of Neo-Aramaic languages as well as the primary languages in their countries of residence, modern Assyrians are Syriac Christians who claim descent from Assyria, one of the oldest civilizations in the world, dating back to 2500 BC in ancient Mesopotamia.

Apiashal had been an early monarch of the Early Period of Aššūrāyu (Assyria) according to the Assyrian King List (AKL). He is listed within the section of the AKL as the last of whom, "altogether seventeen kings, tent dwellers." This section shows marked similarities to the ancestors of the First Babylonian dynasty. The AKL also states that Apiashal had been preceded by his father Ushpia Additionally, the AKL states that Apiashal had been succeeded by his son Hale

Preceded by
Ilu-Mer
Monarch of Aššūrāyu
fl. c. 2140 BCE — fl. c. 2127 BCE
Succeeded by
Yakmeni

See also

Timeline of the Assyrian Empire

The timeline of the Assyrian Empire lists the kings, their successors and the major events that occurred in the Assyrian history.

Assyrian continuity is the claim by modern Assyrians and supporting academics that they are at root the direct descendants of the Semitic inhabitants who spoke originally Akkadian and later Imperial Aramaic of ancient Assyria, Babylonia and their immediate surrounds. Modern Assyrians are accepted to be an indigenous ethnic minority of modern Iraq, southeast Turkey, northeastern Syria and border areas of northwest Iran, a region that is roughly what was once ancient Assyria.

Related Research Articles

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Hayani was the twentieth Assyrian monarch of the Early Period of Aššūrāyu (Assyria) according to the Assyrian King List (AKL). Hayani is listed within a section of the AKL as the fourth out of the ten "kings whose fathers are known". This section had been written in reverse order—beginning with Aminu and ending with Apiashalaltogether ten kings who are ancestors”—and has often been interpreted as the list of ancestors of the Amorite Šamši-Adad I who had conquered the city-state of Aššur. The AKL also states that Hayani was the son and successor of Hale. Additionally, the AKL states that Hayani had been both the predecessor and father of Ilu-Mer.

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Hale was the eighteenth Assyrian monarch of the Early Period of Aššūrāyu (Assyria), according to the Assyrian King List (AKL).

Samani was the nineteenth Assyrian monarch of the Early Period of Aššūrāyu (Assyria) according to the Assyrian King List (AKL). Samani is listed within a section of the AKL as the third out of the ten "kings whose fathers are known". This section had been written in reverse order—beginning with Aminu and ending with Apiashalaltogether ten kings who are ancestors”—and has often been interpreted as the list of ancestors of the Amorite Šamši-Adad I who had conquered the city-state of Aššur. The AKL also states that Samani was the son and successor of Hale. Additionally, the AKL states that Samani had been both the predecessor and father of Hayani.

Ilu-Mer was the twenty-first Assyrian monarch of the Early Period of Aššūrāyu (Assyria) according to the Assyrian King List (AKL). Ilu-Mer is listed within a section of the AKL as the fifth out of the ten "kings whose fathers are known". This section had been written in reverse order—beginning with Aminu and ending with Apiashalaltogether ten kings who are ancestors”—and has often been interpreted as the list of ancestors of the Amorite Šamši-Adad I who had conquered the city-state of Aššur. The AKL also states that Ilu-Mer was the son and successor of Hayani. Additionally, the AKL states that Ilu-Mer had been both the predecessor and father of Yakmesi.

Yakmeni had been the twenty-third Assyrian monarch of the Early Period of Aššūrāyu (Assyria) according to the Assyrian King List (AKL). Yakmeni is listed within a section of the AKL as the seventh out of the ten, "kings whose fathers are known." This section had been written in reverse order—beginning with Aminu and ending with Apiashalaltogether ten kings who are ancestors”—and has often been interpreted as the list of ancestors of the Amorite Šamši-Adad I who had conquered the city-state of Aššur. The AKL also states that Yakmeni had been both the son and successor of Yakmesi. Additionally, the AKL states that Yakmeni had been both the predecessor and father of Yazkur-el.

Yazkur-el had been the twenty-fourth Assyrian monarch of the Early Period of Aššūrāyu (Assyria) according to the Assyrian King List (AKL). Yazkur-el is listed within a section of the AKL as the eighth out of the ten, "kings whose fathers are known." This section had been written in reverse order—beginning with Aminu and ending with Apiashalaltogether ten kings who are ancestors”—and has often been interpreted as the list of ancestors of the Amorite Šamši-Adad I who had conquered the city-state of Aššur. The AKL also states that Yazkur-el had been both the son and successor of Yakmeni. Additionally, the AKL states that Yazkur-el had been both the predecessor and father of Ila-kabkabu.

Aminu had been the twenty-sixth Assyrian monarch of the Early Period of Aššūrāyu (Assyria) according to the Assyrian King List (AKL). Aminu is listed within a section of the AKL as the last of the, "kings whose fathers are known." This section had been written in reverse order—beginning with Aminu and ending with Apiashalaltogether ten kings who are ancestors”—and has often been interpreted as the list of ancestors of the Amorite Šamši-Adad I who had conquered the city-state of Aššur. The AKL also states that Aminu had been both the son and successor of Ila-kabkabu. Additionally, the AKL states that Yazkur-el had been both the predecessor and father of Sulili.

Akiya was an early ruler of the city-state Assur. According to the Assyrian King List (AKL), he was the twenty-ninth Assyrian monarch of the Early Period of Assyria. He is listed within a section of the AKL as the third out of the six, "kings whose eponyms are not known." The AKL states that Akiya was the successor of Kikkia, and was the predecessor of Puzur-Ashur I. Very little is otherwise known of Akiya's reign.

Early Period (Assyria)

The Early Period refers to the history of Assyrian civilization of Mesopotamia between 2500 BCE and 2025 BCE. It is the first of the four periods into which the history of the Assyrian civilisation is traditionally divided. The other periods are the Old Assyrian Empire, the Middle Assyrian Empire and the Neo-Assyrian Empire.

References

  1. Glassner, Jean-Jacques (2004). Mesopotamian Chronicles. Society of Biblical Literature. p. 137. ISBN   1589830903.
  2. 1 2 Meissner, Bruno (1990). Reallexikon der Assyriologie. 6. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter. p. 104. ISBN   3110100517.
  3. Van De Mieroop, Marc (2004). A History of the Ancient Near East ca. 3000-323 BC (2nd ed.). Blackwell Publishing. p. 107. ISBN   9781405149112.