Yamada Line (Kintetsu)

Last updated
Yamada Line
KT number-M.svg
Model 23000 of Kintetsu Corporation.jpg
Kintetsu Ise-Shima Liner at Ujiyamada Station
Overview
Locale Mie Prefecture
Termini Ise-Nakagawa
Ujiyamada
Stations14
Service
Type Commuter rail
Operator(s) Kintetsu Railway
History
OpenedMarch 17, 1931
Technical
Line length28.3 km (17.6 mi)
Number of tracks2
Track gauge 1,435 mm (4 ft 8+12 in)
Electrification 1,500 V DC overhead
Route map
All lines are Kintetsu unless otherwise noted

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Osaka Namba
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Osaka Uehommachi
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Kyōto
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Yamato-Yagi
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Nagoya
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0.0 Ise-Nakagawa
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Arrow Blue Down 001.jpeg Yamada Line
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3.0 Ise-Nakahara
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5.7 Matsugasaki
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Matsue
Closed 1937
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Sakanai River
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8.4 Matsusaka
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10.0 Higashi-Matsusaka
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National Route 42 Matsusaka-Taki Bypass
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13.9 Kushida
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15.8 Koishiro
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17.1 Saikū
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19.8 Myōjō
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Myōjō Depot
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22.4 Akeno
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24.2 Obata
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26.3 Miyamachi
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27.7 Iseshi
(Yamada)
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28.3 Ujiyamada
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Toba
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Kashikojima

The Yamada Line (山田線, Yamada-sen) is a railway line of the Japanese private railway company Kintetsu Railway, connecting Ise-Nakagawa Station (Matsusaka, Mie) and Ujiyamada Station (Ise, Mie) in Japan. The line runs parallel to parts of the JR Central Kisei Main Line and Sangū Line.

Contents

The line connects with the Toba Line at Ujiyamada Station. The Yamada Line, Toba Line, and Shima Line form a single train line that begins at Ise-Nakagawa Station and serves the Ise-Shima tourist region.

In 1941 when the line received its name, the city of Ise was called Ujiyamada and was actually a merger of two towns formerly called Uji and Yamada. The heart of the old town of Yamada was near modern-day Ujiyamada Station, the terminus, and thus the line was named the "Yamada Line".

Services

 LO  Local (普通; futsū)

Arrow Blue Up 001.jpeg For Ise-Nakagawa
Arrow Blue Down 001.jpeg For Ujiyamada, Toba, Kashikojima
(Locals stop at every station.)


 EX  Express (急行; kyūkō)

Arrow Blue Up 001.jpeg For Osaka Uehommachi ; via Nabari and Yamato-Yagi (Kashihara)
Arrow Blue Up 001.jpeg For Nagoya; via Tsu and Yokkaichi
Arrow Blue Down 001.jpeg For Matsusaka, Ujiyamada, Isuzugawa, Toba
(Typically ends at Ujiyamada and Isuzugawa.)


 RE  Rapid Express (快速急行; kaisoku-kyūkō)

Arrow Blue Up 001.jpeg For Osaka Uehommachi ; via Nabari and Yamato-Yagi (Kashihara)
Arrow Blue Down 001.jpeg For Matsusaka, Ujiyamada, Toba
(Only runs mornings and evenings.)
(Typically ends at Ujiyamada and Isuzugawa.)


 LE  Limited Express (特急; tokkyū)

Arrow Blue Up 001.jpeg For Osaka Namba and Osaka Uehommachi ; via Nabari and Yamato-Yagi (Kashihara)
Arrow Blue Up 001.jpeg For Kyoto ; via Yamato-Saidaiji (Nara)
Arrow Blue Up 001.jpeg For Nagoya; via Tsu and Yokkaichi
Arrow Blue Down 001.jpeg For Matsusaka, Ujiyamada, Toba, Kashikojima
(Seat reservations and limited express fee required.)


 NS  Non-stop Limited Express (ノンストップ特急; nonsutoppu tokkyū)

Arrow Blue Up 001.jpeg For Osaka Namba
Arrow Blue Up 001.jpeg For Nagoya
Arrow Blue Down 001.jpeg For Kashikojima
(Runs twice a day on weekends.)
(Seat reservations and limited express fee required.)

 SV  Premium Express Shimakaze (しまかぜ; Shimakaze) [1]

Arrow Blue Up 001.jpeg For Osaka Namba
Arrow Blue Up 001.jpeg For Kyoto
Arrow Blue Up 001.jpeg For Nagoya
Arrow Blue Down 001.jpeg For Kashikojima
(Train to and from Osaka runs once a day except on Tuesday with some exceptions.)
(Train to and from Kyoto runs once a day except on Wednesday with some exceptions.)
(Train to and from Nagoya runs once a day except on Thursday with some exceptions.)
(Seat reservations, limited express fee and "Shimakaze" special vehicle fee required.)

Stations

Legend
Trains stop here
Trains stop here sometimes
|Trains do not stop here
No.StationDistance (km)TransfersLOEXRELENSSVLocation
 M61  Ise-Nakagawa 伊勢中川0.0 Osaka Line, Nagoya Line || Matsusaka Mie Prefecture
 M62  Ise-Nakahara 伊勢中原3.0|||||
 M63  Matsugasaki 松ヶ崎5.7|||||
 M64  Matsusaka 松阪8.4 Kisei Main Line, Meishō Line ||
 M65  Higashi-Matsusaka 東松阪10.0|||||
 M66  Kushida 櫛田13.9|||||
 M67  Koishiro 漕代15.8|||||
 M68  Saikū 斎宮17.1||||| Meiwa
 M69  Myōjō 明星19.8|||||
 M70  Akeno 明野22.4||||| Ise
 M71  Obata 小俣24.2|||||
 M72  Miyamachi 宮町26.3||||
 M73  Iseshi 伊勢市27.7 Sangū Line
 M74  Ujiyamada 宇治山田28.3 Toba Line

History

The Yamada Line was built in the late 1920s and early 1930s to provide a more direct link for pilgrims and travelers going between Osaka and Ise Grand Shrine in Ujiyamada (now Ise) and was designed to compete with the Japanese National Railways Sangū Line (now owned by JR Central).

Sankyū Main Line

Originally built and operated by Sangū Express Electric Railway (Sankyū) the line was designed to link directly with what is now the Osaka Line. However, at that time the Osaka Line, which was operated under a different name by Osaka Electric Railroad (Daiki), only ran to Sakurai and Sankyū managed the section from Sakurai to Ujiyamada; this railway was known as the Sankyū Main Line (参急本線, Sankyū-honsen).

During the construction of the easternmost section of the Sankyū Main Line (most of what is now the Yamada Line), another private railway company, Ise Electric Railway (Iseden), was constructing another line right alongside that would eventually link with Nagoya and was known as the Iseden Main Line. The two lines opened within just a few weeks of each other in 1930 which led to there being three parallel lines (the third being the Sangū Line) owned by three different companies running between Matsusaka and Ujiyamada. Sankyū and Iseden pledged to work together to ensure they both prospered, however both companies soon began a merger struggle and, in 1936, Sankyū won the battle and acquired Iseden and its lines. The Iseden Main Line became known as the Sankyū Ise Line.

Sankyū now owned two lines that both terminated in Ujiyamada: The Main Line which ran west towards Osaka and the Ise Line which ran north to Kuwana with plans for an extension to Nagoya. However, the last 20 km (12 mi) of both lines closely paralleled each other, so Sankyū developed a plan to utilize one of these two sets of tracks to provide service to both Osaka and Nagoya and to phase out and eventually close the other. It was decided that the Sankyū Main Line was the better line for this task and that Sankyū-Nakagawa Station (now Ise-Nakagawa) would serve as the three-way meeting point of trains bound for Osaka, Nagoya, and Ujiyamada. This plan became a reality within just a couple of years; the Ise Line was extended northeast to Nagoya and a new track connecting the Ise Line (at Edobashi) to Sankyū-Nakagawa was completed (this would later become the Kintetsu Nagoya Line). Once this major change took place, ridership on the Matsusaka ~ Ujiyamada section of the Main Line became significantly higher and the parallel section of the Ise Line was closed in 1942.

Yamada Line

In 1941, Sankyū and its parent company Daiki merged to form Kansai Kyuko Railway (Kankyū), the precursor to Kintetsu. Before this merger, the Sankyū Main Line had originated at Sakurai and terminated at Ujiyamada, however after the merger the various lines were combined and renamed, resulting in the section between Sakurai and Ise-Nakagawa, along with part of Daiki's lines, becoming the Osaka Line and the section between Ise-Nakagawa and Ujiyamada becoming the Yamada Line, as it is today. In 1944, following mergers with other Kansai area railway companies, Kankyū became Kintetsu and the line came under its current ownership and name. Although the city of Ujiyamada (the basis for the name "Yamada Line") changed its name to Ise in 1955, the train line still maintains the same name to this day.

Even though Kintetsu owned both the Nagoya Line and the Yamada Line, direct service between Nagoya and Ujiyamada was not possible because the Sankyū Main Line (Yamada Line) was built using a railway gauge of 1,435 mm (4 ft 8+12 in) standard gauge , however the Sankyū Ise Line (Nagoya Line) was built using a gauge of 1,067 mm (3 ft 6 in), so it was necessary for passengers to change trains at Ise-Nakagawa. However, in September 1959, the Nagoya Line suffered severe damage due to the Ise-wan Typhoon and while repairing the line, Kintetsu widened the gauge of the entire line to 1,435 mm so that express trains could travel directly from Nagoya to Ujiyamada without changing; this service began in early 1960.

Direct service from both Osaka and Nagoya was extended from Ujiyamada to Kashikojima in 1970 with the opening of the Toba Line which provided a connection between Ujiyamada at the end of the Yamada Line and Toba at the beginning of the then-isolated Shima Line.

Timeline

Former connecting lines

Related Research Articles

Ise, Mie City in Kansai, Japan

Ise, formerly called Ujiyamada (宇治山田), is a city in central Mie Prefecture, on the island of Honshū, Japan. Ise is home to Ise Grand Shrine, the most sacred Shintō shrine in Japan. The city has a long-standing title – Shinto (神都) – that roughly means "the Holy City", and literally means "the Capital of the Kami". As of 31 July 2021, the city had an estimated population of 123,533 in 55,911 households and a population density of 590 persons per km². The total area of the city is 208.53 square kilometres (80.51 sq mi).

Kintetsu Railway Japanese railway company

Kintetsu Railway Co., Ltd., referred to as Kintetsu (近鉄), is a Japanese passenger railway company, managing infrastructure and operating passenger train service. Its railway system is the largest in Japan, excluding Japan Railways Group. The railway network connects Osaka, Nara, Kyoto, Nagoya, Tsu, Ise, and Yoshino. Kintetsu Railway Co., Ltd. is a wholly owned subsidiary of Kintetsu Group Holdings Co., Ltd.

Osaka Line

The Osaka Line is a railway line in Japan owned by Kintetsu Railway, connecting Osaka and Mie Prefecture via Nara Prefecture. The line is the longest double-tracked railway of non-JR operators. Together with the Nagoya Line, this line forms the route for Kintetsu limited express services connecting Osaka and Nagoya in competition with the Tokaido Shinkansen.

Nagoya Line (Kintetsu)

The Nagoya Line is a railway line owned and operated by the Kintetsu Railway, a Japanese private railway company, connecting Nagoya and Ise Nakagawa Station in Matsusaka, Mie Prefecture via Kuwana, Yokkaichi, Suzuka, Tsu municipalities along the Ise Bay. The official starting-point of the line is Ise-Nakagawa and the terminus is Nagoya; however, operationally trains run "down" from and "up" towards Nagoya.

Meitetsu Nagoya Station Railway station in Nagoya, Japan

Meitetsu Nagoya Station is the principal station of the Nagoya Railroad (Meitetsu) system in Nagoya, Japan. Most trains of Meitetsu's major lines operate through this station. The station is also a gateway to the Chūbu Centrair International Airport, which is connected with the station by the Rapid Express service started on January 29, 2005.

Kintetsu Nagoya Station Railway station in Nagoya, Japan

Kintetsu Nagoya Station is a terminal station on the Kintetsu Nagoya Line. It is connected to Nagoya Station and Meitetsu Nagoya Station.

Ujiyamada Station Railway station in Ise, Mie Prefecture, Japan

Ujiyamada Station is a junction railway station located in the city of Ise, Mie Prefecture, Japan, operated by the private operator Kintetsu. It is the closest station to Ise Grand Shrine and thus has an important role for tourists and pilgrims. The station also administrates the section between Kushida Station and Isuzugawa Station.

Ise-Nakagawa Station Railway station in Matsusaka, Mie Prefecture, Japan

Ise-Nakagawa Station is a major junction station owned and operated by the private Kintetsu railway company in the city of Matsusaka, Mie Prefecture. The station is served by all trains on that company's Yamada Line and most trains on its Nagoya and Osaka Lines.The Ise-Nakagawa stationmaster is responsible for managing the sections between here and Higashi-Aoyama on the Osaka Line and between here and Higashi-Matsusaka on the Yamada Line.

Iseshi Station Railway station in Ise, Mie Prefecture, Japan

Iseshi Station is a union passenger railway station located in the city of Ise, Mie Prefecture, Japan, operated by the [[Central Japan Railway Company| JR Central and the private railway operator Kintetsu Railway

Kashikojima Station Railway station in Shima, Mie Prefecture, Japan

Kashikojima Station is a passenger railway station in located in the city of Shima, Mie Prefecture, Japan, operated by the private railway operator Kintetsu Railway.

Toba Line

The Toba Line is a railway line operated by the Japanese private railway company Kintetsu Railway, connecting Ujiyamada Station in Ise, Mie with Toba Station in Toba, Mie. The line runs parallel to JR Central's Sangū Line.

Shima Line

The Shima Line is a railway line in Mie Prefecture, Japan, operated by private railway operator Kintetsu Railway, connecting Toba Station in Toba with Kashikojima Station in Shima.

Myōjō Station Railway station in Meiwa, Mie Prefecture, Japan

Myōjō Station is a passenger railway station in located in the town of Meiwa, Taki District, Mie Prefecture, Japan, operated by the private railway operator Kintetsu Railway. The station has the Inspection Center for the Yamada Line, the Toba Line and the Shima Line.

Ise-Nakahara Station Railway station in Matsusaka, Mie Prefecture, Japan

Ise-Nakahara Station is a passenger railway station located in the city of Matsusaka, Mie Prefecture, Japan, operated by the private railway operator Kintetsu Railway.

Matsugasaki Station (Mie) Railway station in Matsusaka, Mie Prefecture, Japan

Matsugasaki Station is a passenger railway station located in the city of Matsusaka, Mie Prefecture, Japan, operated by the private railway operator Kintetsu Railway.

Kintetsu Kanie Station Railway station in Kanie, Aichi Prefecture, Japan

Kintetsu Kanie Station is a railway station in the town of Kanie, Ama District, Aichi Prefecture, Japan, operated by the private railway operator Kintetsu Railway.

Sangū Line

The Sangū Line is a railway line run by Central Japan Railway Company, connecting Taki Station with Toba Station in Japan.

Ise Electric Railway, usually abbreviated as Iseden (伊勢電), was a private railway company that operated mostly in Mie Prefecture, Japan, for 25 years from 1911 to 1936, when it was absorbed by Sangū Express Electric Railway. At its height, Iseden operated three train lines, two of which it planned and built, that serviced the cities of Yokkaichi, Tsu, Suzuka, Matsusaka, Ujiyamada, and Ōgaki. Much of the infrastructure of Iseden is now owned by Kintetsu and remains in use today.

Suzuka Line

The Suzuka Line is a railway line of the Japanese private railway company Kintetsu Railway, connecting Ise-Wakamatsu Station and Hiratachō Station in Japan.

Sangū Express Electric Railway, usually abbreviated as Sankyū (参急), was a private railway company that operated in Nara Prefecture and Mie Prefecture, Japan for 14 years from 1927 to 1941, when it merged with its parent company, Ōsaka Electric Railroad (Daiki). Sankyū built a single train line which serviced the cities of Sakurai, Nabari, Matsusaka, and Ujiyamada, and the company acquired a second major line as well as a small local line from Ise Electric Railway (Iseden). These lines extended northwards from Matsusaka through cities in Mie Prefecture along the coast of Ise Bay as far as Kuwana. The infrastructure of Sankyū is now owned by Kintetsu and remains in use today.

References

  1. 近畿日本鉄道|観光特急しまかぜのご案内 (in Japanese). Kintetsu. Archived from the original on July 2, 2014.