Ye (surname)

Last updated
Ye
Xie Xing  - Kai Ti .svg
Pronunciation(Mandarin)

Yip (Cantonese)
Yap (Hakka, Hokkien)

Diệp (Vietnamese)
Language(s)Chinese, Vietnamese
Origin
Language(s) Old Chinese
Word/name City of Ye, State of Chu
Meaningleaf
Other names
Variant form(s)Yeh, Yip, Ip, Yap, Yapp, Yeap, Yiapp
Derivative(s)Diệp

Ye (traditional Chinese : ; simplified Chinese : ; pinyin :) is a Chinese-language surname. It is listed 257th in the Song dynasty classic text Hundred Family Surnames , [1] and is the 43rd most common surname in China, with a population of 5.8 million as of 2008 and 2019. [2] [3] Ye is usually romanized as "Yeh" in Taiwan based on Wade-Giles; "Yip", "Ip", and "Jip" in Cantonese; "Iap", "Yap", "Yapp", "Yiapp" and "Yeap" in Hakka and Hokkien. [4]

Contents

Pronunciation

In Middle Chinese, Ye () was pronounced Sjep (IPA: [ɕiɛp] ). As late as the 11th-century Guangyun Dictionary , it was a homophone of other characters that are pronounced shè in modern Mandarin and sip in modern Cantonese. [5]

Distribution

As of 2008, Ye is the 43rd most common surname in Taipei Taiwan, with a population of 5.8 million. [2] It is the 22nd most common surname in Taiwan as of 2005.

Origin

Ye means "leaf" in modern Chinese, but the name arose as a lineage name referring to the city of Ye (in modern Ye County, Henan) in the State of Chu during the Spring and Autumn period of ancient China. [6]

According to Sima Qian's Records of the Grand Historian , Yuxiong, a descendant of the Yellow Emperor and his grandson Zhuanxu, was the teacher of King Wen of Zhou. After the Zhou overthrew the Shang dynasty, King Cheng of Zhou (reigned 1042-1021 BC) awarded Yuxiong's great-grandson Xiong Yi the fiefdom of Chu, which over the ensuing centuries developed into a major kingdom. King Zhuang of Chu (reigned 613-591 BC) was one of the Five Hegemons, the most powerful monarchs during the Spring and Autumn period. [7]

In 506 BC the State of Wu invaded Chu with an army commanded by King Helü, Wu Zixu and Sun Tzu. Shen Yin Shu, a great-grandson of King Zhuang and the Chu field marshal, was killed in the aftermath of the Battle of Boju. [8] [9]

After the war King Zhao of Chu enfeoffed Shen Yin Shu's son Shen Zhuliang with the key frontier city of Ye, in gratitude for his father's sacrifice. Shen Zhuliang subsequently put down the rebellion of Sheng, Duke of Bai, in 478 BC and restored King Hui as ruler of Chu. King Hui then granted him the titles of prime minister, marshal, and Duke of Ye (葉公). [6]

In Zhou dynasty China, noble families usually had two surnames: clan name () and lineage name (). Shen Zhuliang, from a cadet branch of the ruling house of Chu, shared the lineage name of Mi () of the Chu kings. He also inherited the clan name of Shen from his father, but his fame led some of his descendants to adopt Ye as their clan name. Later the distinction between the clan and lineage names was abolished, and Ye became the surname of Shen Zhuliang's descendants. Shen Zhuliang, now better known as Duke of Ye, is considered the founding ancestor of the Ye surname. [6]

Notable people

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References

  1. 百家姓 [Hundred Family Surnames] (in Chinese). Guoxue. Retrieved 2014-09-28.
  2. 1 2 中国最新300大姓排名(2008) [300 most common surnames in China (2008)] (in Chinese). Taiwan.cn. 2009-01-06. Retrieved 2014-09-28.
  3. "新京报 - 好新闻,无止境".
  4. Note: Ye is less commonly romanized "Yee" or "Ee", which are normally employed for romanizing the Cantonese pronunciation of the unrelated Chinese surname (Yu).
  5. 廣韻査詢系統/小韻檢索/攝 (in Chinese). Guangyun Net. Retrieved 2012-02-08.
  6. 1 2 3 "葉姓來源及郡望堂號 Archived 2012-04-25 at the Wayback Machine ." (in Chinese)
  7. Sima Qian. "楚世家 (House of Chu)". Records of the Grand Historian (in Chinese). Archived from the original on 10 March 2012. Retrieved 8 November 2011.
  8. "沈尹戍 [Shen Yin Shu]" (in Chinese).
  9. "柏舉之戰 (Battle of Boju)" (in Chinese). Ministry of Defense. 22 July 2009. Archived from the original on 25 April 2012. Retrieved 8 November 2011.