Yesterday (1959 film)

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Yesterday
Directed by Márton Keleti
Written byImre Dobozi
Starring Zoltán Makláry
CinematographyBarnabás Hegyi
Release date
  • 1959 (1959)
CountryHungary
LanguageHungarian

Yesterday (Hungarian : Tegnap) is a 1959 Hungarian drama film directed by Márton Keleti. It was entered into the 1st Moscow International Film Festival. [1]

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References

  1. "1st Moscow International Film Festival (1959)". MIFF. Retrieved 27 October 2012.[ dead link ]