Yonsa County

Last updated
Yonsa County
연사군
County
Korean transcription(s)
  Hanja延社郡
  McCune-ReischauerYŏnsa kun
  Revised RomanizationYeonsa-gun
DPRK2006 Hambuk-Yonsa.PNG
Map of North Hamgyong showing the location of Yonsa
Country North Korea
Province North Hamgyong Province
Administrative divisions 1 ŭp;, 1 workers' district, 10 ri
Area
  Total1,200 km2 (500 sq mi)
Population (1991 est.)
  Total33,000

Yŏnsa County is a kun, or county, in North Hamgyŏng province, North Korea. It was created following the division of Korea, being split off from Musan county in the 1952 reorganization of local government.

North Hamgyong Province Province in Kwanbuk, North Korea

North Hamgyong Province is the northernmost province of North Korea. The province was formed in 1896 from the northern half of the former Hamgyong Province.

North Korea Sovereign state in East Asia

North Korea, officially the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, is a country in East Asia constituting the northern part of the Korean Peninsula, with Pyongyang the capital and the largest city in the country. The name Korea is derived from Goguryeo which was one of the great powers in East Asia during its time, ruling most of the Korean Peninsula, Manchuria, parts of the Russian Far East and Inner Mongolia, under Gwanggaeto the Great. To the north and northwest, the country is bordered by China and by Russia along the Amnok and Tumen rivers; it is bordered to the south by South Korea, with the heavily fortified Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) separating the two. Nevertheless, North Korea, like its southern counterpart, claims to be the legitimate government of the entire peninsula and adjacent islands.

Division of Korea Historical event separating North and South Korea

The Division of Korea began at the end of World War II in 1945. With the defeat of Japan, the Soviet Union occupied the north of Korea, and the United States occupied the south, with the boundary between their zones being the 38th parallel.

Contents

Geography

The land of Yŏnsa is high and mountainous, with even the low-lying areas more than 500 meters above sea level. The county is traversed by the Hamgyŏng Mountains and the Paengmu Plateau. Various streams flow through the county, including the Yŏnmyŏnsu (Chosŏn'gŭl: 연면수, Hancha: 延面水), Kuunsu (Chosŏn'gŭl: 구운수, Hancha: 九雲水), Sudongsu (Chosŏn'gŭl: 수동수), and Sŏdusu (Chosŏn'gŭl: 서두수, Hancha: 西頭水). 84% of the county is forested. The highest point is Kwanmobong (Chosŏn'gŭl: 관모봉, Hancha: 冠帽峰).

Sea level Average level for the surface of the ocean at any given geographical position on the planetary surface

Mean sea level (MSL) is an average level of the surface of one or more of Earth's oceans from which heights such as elevation may be measured. MSL is a type of vertical datum – a standardised geodetic datum – that is used, for example, as a chart datum in cartography and marine navigation, or, in aviation, as the standard sea level at which atmospheric pressure is measured to calibrate altitude and, consequently, aircraft flight levels. A common and relatively straightforward mean sea-level standard is the midpoint between a mean low and mean high tide at a particular location.

The Hamgyong Mountains, officially known as the Gangbaekjeonggan and formerly known as the Pepi Shan or Tumen Mountains, is a North Korean mountain range. It lies in the northeast quarter of the country, extending for about 350 kilometers (220 mi) southwest and northeast parallel to the Sea of Japan. Its northern terminus is in the Tumen Valley. To its west are the Kaema Highlands.

Administrative divisions

Yŏnsa County is divided into 1 ŭp (town), 1 rodongjagu (workers' districts) and 10 ri (villages):

Administrative divisions of North Korea

The administrative divisions of North Korea are organized into three hierarchical levels. These divisions were discovered in 2002. Many of the units have equivalents in the system of South Korea. At the highest level are nine provinces, two directly governed cities, and three special administrative divisions. The second-level divisions are cities, counties, wards, and districts. These are further subdivided into third-level entities: towns, neighborhoods, villages, and workers' districts.

  • Yŏnsa-ŭp
  • Sinyang-rodongjagu
  • Kwangyang-ri
  • Namchang-ri
  • P'also-ri
  • Rop'yŏng-ri
  • Samha-ri
  • Samp'o-ri
  • Sinbung-ri
  • Sinchang-ri
  • Sŏksu-ri
  • Yŏnsu-ri

Economy

Lumbering dominates the economy of Yŏnsa, and there are numerous lumbermills. Wild roots and fruits are also gathered from the mountains.

There is very little agriculture, due to the lack of arable land; the farming that is carried out is chiefly dry-field farming. Yŏnsa is responsible for more than half of North Hamgyŏng's potato crop. Cultivated land makes up 4.3% of the county's area.

Transportation

Yŏnsa lies on the Paengmu Line of the Korean State Railway, and is also served by roads.

Paengmu Line The railway which connects Paegam with Musan in DPRK.

The Paengmu Line is a partially electrified narrow gauge line of the Korean State Railway running from Paeg'am on the Paektusan Ch'ŏngnyŏn Line to Musan on the Musan Line, in the Ryanggang and North Hamgyŏng provinces of North Korea.

Korean State Railway

The Korean State Railway is the operating arm of the Ministry of Railways of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea and has its headquarters at P'yŏngyang. The current Minister of Railways is Chon Kil-su, who has held the position since 2009.

See also

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