Yorkshire Dales National Park

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Yorkshire Dales National Park
IUCN category V (protected landscape/seascape)
YorkshireDalesSign.jpg
National park entrance sign, near Skipton
Yorkshire Dales National Park UK location map.svg
Location and extent of the Yorkshire Dales National Park, as of August 2016
LocationNorth Yorkshire, Cumbria & Lancashire, England
Coordinates 54°15′N2°13′W / 54.250°N 2.217°W / 54.250; -2.217 Coordinates: 54°15′N2°13′W / 54.250°N 2.217°W / 54.250; -2.217
Area2,178 km2 (841 sq mi)
Max. elevation Whernside
736 m (2,415 ft)
Designation National Park
Established1954
Stone houses in Hawes, a typical example of Dales architecture Hawes house 01.JPG
Stone houses in Hawes, a typical example of Dales architecture
Limestone hills and dry-stone walls in the west of the Yorkshire Dales. This part of the national park is popular with walkers due to the presence of the Yorkshire three peaks. Dry stone wall 20.JPG
Limestone hills and dry-stone walls in the west of the Yorkshire Dales. This part of the national park is popular with walkers due to the presence of the Yorkshire three peaks.

The Yorkshire Dales National Park is a 2,178 km2 (841 sq mi) national park in England covering most of the Yorkshire Dales. Most of the park is in North Yorkshire, with a sizeable area in Cumbria and a small part in Lancashire. The park was designated in 1954, and extended in 2016. Over 95% of the land in the Park is under private ownership; there are over 1,000 farms in this area. [1]

Contents

In late 2020, the park was named as an International Dark Sky Reserve. This honour confirms that the area has "low levels of light pollution with good conditions for astronomy". [2]

Some 23,500 residents live in the park (as of 2017); a 2018 report estimated that the Park attracted over four million visitors per year. [3] The economy consists primarily of tourism and agriculture. [4]

Location

The park is 50 miles (80 km) north-east of Manchester; Otley, Ilkley, Leeds and Bradford lie to the south, while Kendal is to the west, Darlington to the north-east and Harrogate to the south-east. [5] The national park does not include all of the Yorkshire Dales. Parts of the dales to the south and east of the national park are located in the Nidderdale Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. The national park also includes the Howgill Fells and Orton Fells in the north west although they are not often considered part of the dales.

History

In 1947, the Hobhouse Report recommended the creation of the Yorkshire Dales National Park in the then West Riding and North Riding of Yorkshire. The proposed National Park included most of the Yorkshire Dales, but not Nidderdale. Accordingly, Nidderdale was not included in the National Park when it was designated in 1954. In 1963 the then West Riding County Council proposed that Nidderdale should be added to the National Park, but the proposal met with opposition from the district councils which would have lost some of their powers to the county council.

Following the Local Government Act 1972 most of the area of the national park was transferred in 1974 to the new county of North Yorkshire. An area in the north west of the national park (Dentdale, Garsdale and the town of Sedbergh) was transferred from the West Riding of Yorkshire to the new county of Cumbria. In 1997 management of the national park passed from the county councils to the Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority. [6]

2016 extension

A westward extension of the park into Lancashire and Cumbria encompassed much of the area between the old boundaries of the park and the M6 motorway. This increased the area by nearly 24% and brought the park close to the towns of Kirkby Lonsdale, Kirkby Stephen and Appleby-in-Westmorland. [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] The extension also includes the northern portion of the Howgill Fells and most of the Orton Fells. [12] Before the expansion, the national park was solely in the historic county of Yorkshire, the expansion bringing in parts of historic Lancashire and Westmorland.

Tourism

A traditional pub with rooms to let in Hawes Pub bullshead Hawes 177.jpg
A traditional pub with rooms to let in Hawes

The area has a wide range of activities for visitors. For example, many people come to the Dales for walking or other exercise. Several long-distance routes cross the park, including the Pennine Way, the Dales Way, the Coast to Coast Walk and the Pennine Bridleway. [13] Cycling is also popular and there are several cycleways. [14]

The DalesBus service provides service in the Dales on certain days in summer, "including the Yorkshire Dales National Park and Nidderdale Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty". In summer, these buses supplement the other services that operate year-round in the Dales. [15] [16]

Tourism in the region declined due to restrictions necessitated by the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, and into 2021. Later in 2021, the volume of visits was expected to increase as a result of the 2020 TV series All Creatures Great and Small , largely filmed within the Dales. [17] The first series aired in the UK in September 2020 and in the US in early 2021. One source stated that visits to Yorkshire Web sites had increased significantly by late September 2020. [18] By early 2021, the Discover England Web sites, for example, were using the tag line "Discover 'All Creatures Great and Small' in Yorkshire". [19]

The Dales Countryside Museum is housed in the converted Hawes railway station in Wensleydale in the north of the area. [20] The park also has five visitor centres. [21] These are at:

A small section of Aysgarth Falls Aysgarth Falls 9190.jpg
A small section of Aysgarth Falls

Other places and sights within the National Park include:

Bolton Castle Bolton Castle June 2018 9535.jpg
Bolton Castle

Related Research Articles

North Yorkshire County of England

North Yorkshire is the largest non-metropolitan county and lieutenancy area in England, covering an area of 8,654 square kilometres (3,341 sq mi). Around 40% of the county is covered by national parks, including most of the Yorkshire Dales and the North York Moors. It is one of four counties in England to hold the name Yorkshire; the three other counties are the East Riding of Yorkshire, South Yorkshire and West Yorkshire.

Pennines Range of uplands in Northern England

The Pennines, also known as the Pennine Chain or Pennine Hills, are a more-or-less continuous range of hills and mountains running between three regions of Northern England: North West England on the west, and North East England and Yorkshire and the Humber on the east. Commonly described as the "backbone of England", the range stretches northwards from the Peak District at the southern end, through the South Pennines, the Yorkshire Dales and North Pennines to the Tyne Gap, which separates the range from the Cheviot Hills across the Anglo-Scottish border. South of the Aire Gap is a western spur into east Lancashire, comprising the Rossendale Fells, West Pennine Moors and the Bowland Fells in North Lancashire. The Howgill Fells and Orton Fells in Cumbria are sometimes considered to be Pennine spurs to the west of the range. The Pennines are an important water catchment area with numerous reservoirs in the head streams of the river valleys.

Yorkshire Dales Upland area of the Pennines in Northern England

The Yorkshire Dales is an upland area of the Pennines in the historic county of Yorkshire, England, most of it in the Yorkshire Dales National Park created in 1954.

South Lakeland District in England

South Lakeland is a local government district in Cumbria, England. The population of the non-metropolitan district was 102,301 according to the 2001 census, increasing to 103,658 at the 2011 Census. Its council is based in Kendal. It includes much of the Lake District as well as northwestern parts of the Yorkshire Dales.

Cautley Spout Waterfall in Cumbria, England

Cautley Spout is England's highest (cascade) waterfall above ground.. The broken cascade of falls tumbles a total of 650 feet down a cliff face at the head of a wild and bleak glacial valley that comes down from a high plateau called The Calf. It is located in the Howgill Fells, traditionally in the West Riding of Yorkshire but now in Cumbria on the western edge of the Yorkshire Dales National Park. The waterfall is just north of Sedbergh. This fall is one of the few cascade falls in England; most are either tiered or plunge falls.

Malham is a village and civil parish in the Craven district of North Yorkshire, England. Before 20th century boundary changes, the village was part of the Settle Rural District, in the historic West Riding of Yorkshire. In the Domesday Book, the name is given as Malgun, meaning "settlement by the gravelly places". In 2001 the parish had a population of approximately 150. Malham parish increased in size geographically and so at the 2011 Census had a population of 238.

The Howgill Fells are hills in Northern England between the Lake District and the Yorkshire Dales, lying roughly in between the vertices of a triangle made by the towns of Sedbergh, Kirkby Stephen and Tebay. The name Howgill derives from the Old Norse word haugr meaning a hill or barrow, plus gil meaning a narrow valley.

Orton, Eden Village in Cumbria, England

Orton is a village and civil parish in Cumbria, England. It lies 15 miles (24 km) south of Penrith, 8 miles (13 km) from Appleby-in-Westmorland and 1.5 miles (2.4 km) from the M6 motorway. The village is in the upper Lune Valley, at the foot of Orton Scar in the Orton Fells. The Lake District is nearby. The parish includes a wide area outside the village, and had a population of 594 in 2001, decreasing to 588 at the 2011 Census.

Pateley Bridge Market town in North Yorkshire, England

Pateley Bridge is a small market town in Nidderdale in the Borough of Harrogate, North Yorkshire, England. Historically part of the West Riding of Yorkshire, it lies on the River Nidd. It is in the Yorkshire Dales and just outside the Yorkshire Dales National Park.

Sedbergh Town in Cumbria, England

Sedbergh is a town and civil parish in Cumbria, England. The 2001 census gave the parish a population of 2,705, increasing at the 2011 census to 2,765. Historically in the West Riding of Yorkshire, it lies about 10 miles (16 km) east of Kendal, 28 miles (45 km) north of Lancaster and about 10 miles (16 km) north of Kirkby Lonsdale, just within the Yorkshire Dales National Park. It stands at the foot of Howgill Fells, on the north bank of the River Rawthey, which joins the River Lune 2 miles (3 km) below the town.

Nidderdale

Nidderdale, historically also known as Netherdale, is one of the Yorkshire Dales in North Yorkshire, England. It is the upper valley of the River Nidd, which flows south underground and then along the dale, forming several reservoirs including the Gouthwaite Reservoir, before turning east and eventually joining the River Ouse.

Nidderdale AONB

The Nidderdale AONB is an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty in North Yorkshire, England, bordering the Yorkshire Dales National Park to the east and south. It comprises most of Nidderdale itself, part of lower Wharfedale, the Washburn valley and part of lower Wensleydale, including Jervaulx Abbey and the side valleys west of the River Ure. It covers a total area of 233 square miles (600 km2). The highest point in the Nidderdale AONB is Great Whernside, 704 metres (2,310 ft) above sea level, on the border with the Yorkshire Dales National Park.

The Calf

The Calf, at 676 m, is the highest top in the Howgill Fells, an area of high ground in the north-west of the Yorkshire Dales in the county of Cumbria. It can be ascended from the town of Sedbergh to the south, by way of Cautley Spout from the east, or up the long valley of Langdale from the north. The Sedbergh ascent is the most popular, and has the distinction of being on good paths all the way.

Clough River River in Cumbria, England

The Clough River is a river in Cumbria, England. A tributary of the River Rawthey, it flows for 21.8 kilometres (13.5 mi) primarily through the Garsdale valley.

Garsdale Village and civil parish in Cumbria, England

Garsdale is a dale or valley in the south east of Cumbria, England, historically a part of the West Riding of Yorkshire. It is now within the South Lakeland local government district, but is still a "Yorkshire Dale" for planning purposes. In the 2001 census the parish had a population of 202, decreasing at the 2011 census to 191.

Baugh Fell Large, flat-topped hill in the northern Pennines of England

Baugh Fell is a large, flat-topped hill in the northern Pennines of England. It lies in the north-western corner of the Yorkshire Dales National Park, immediately to the east of the Howgill Fells and to the north of Whernside, the highest of the Yorkshire Three Peaks. Formerly in the West Riding of Yorkshire, since 1974 it has been part of the county of Cumbria.

Mountains and hills of England

The mountains and hills of England comprise very different kinds of terrain, from a mountain range which reaches almost 1,000 metres high, to several smaller areas of lower mountains, foothills and sea cliffs. Most of the major upland areas have been designated as Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) or national parks. The highest and most extensive areas are in the north and west, while the midlands, south-east and east of the country tend to be low-lying.

Dentdale Valley in Cumbria, England

Dentdale is a dale or valley in the north-west of the Yorkshire Dales National Park in Cumbria, England. It is the valley of the River Dee, but takes its name from the village of Dent. The dale runs east to west, starting at Dent Head, which is the location of a railway viaduct on the Settle-Carlisle Line.

Dales High Way

A Dales High Way is a long-distance footpath in northern England. It is 90 miles (140 km) long and runs from Saltaire in West Yorkshire to Appleby-in-Westmorland, Cumbria, roughly parallel to the line of the Settle and Carlisle Railway.

Orton Fells

The Orton Fells is an upland area in Northern England, mostly consisting of limestone hills, plateaus and moorlands. Historically in Westmorland, the area lies within the modern county of Cumbria and is bounded by the Lake District to the west, the Eden Valley to the north and east, and the Yorkshire Dales and Howgill Fells to the south. The area mostly falls within the boundaries of the Yorkshire Dales National Park while a small part of the western fells is in the Lake District National Park. The fells are one of 159 National Character Areas defined by Natural England.

References

  1. 4.2 Land ownership and population
  2. "Yorkshire Dales and North York Moors made Dark Sky Reserves". BBC News. 8 December 2020. Retrieved 27 February 2021.
  3. Introduction to the Yorkshire Dales National Park, Section 2.1
  4. 2.4 Population and economy
  5. info@yorkshiredales.org.uk, Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority -. "Welcome to the Yorkshire Dales National Park".
  6. Ray Woolmore (May 2002). "Yorkshire Dales National Park" (PDF). Designation History Series. Natural England. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 June 2014. Retrieved 11 May 2015.
  7. "Natural England - Lakes to Dales Landscape Designation Project". Archived from the original on 18 May 2012. Retrieved 27 February 2021.
  8. "Yorkshire Dales National Park expansion plans agreed". BBC News. 28 September 2011. Retrieved 29 September 2011.
  9. "Dales and Lakes national parks to 'join up' - but leak reveals there's no new money". The Yorkshire Post.
  10. "Yorkshire Dales and Lake District national parks to be extended". BBC News. 23 October 2015. Retrieved 27 February 2021.
  11. "Yorkshire Dales and Lake District national parks extend". BBC News.
  12. "Yorkshire Dales expand into Lancashire in national parks land grab". The Guardian. Retrieved 20 January 2019.
  13. "Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority - Things to do". Archived from the original on 2 July 2010. Retrieved 27 February 2021.
  14. "Cycle the Dales". Cycle the Dales. Retrieved 27 February 2021.
  15. "Welcome to DalesBus". DalesBus - Public Transport in the Yorkshire Dales. Retrieved 27 February 2021.
  16. "Latest News". DalesBus - Public Transport in the Yorkshire Dales. Retrieved 27 February 2021.
  17. "How Yorkshire Dales businesses are preparing for All Creatures Great and Small tourism boom... eventually". Yorkshire Post. 15 September 2020. Retrieved 1 March 2021. He says this year has been extremely challenging for many businesses in the Dales. In the tourism business, it has been a disaster
  18. "New All Creatures Great and Small brings a huge increase in Yorkshire tourism". Examiner. 24 September 2020. Retrieved 27 February 2021.
  19. "Discover 'All Creatures Great and Small' in Yorkshire Thirsk, North Yorkshire". British Tourist Authority. 24 October 2020. Retrieved 27 February 2021.
  20. "Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority - Dales Countryside Museum". Archived from the original on 26 July 2010. Retrieved 27 February 2021.
  21. "Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority - National Park Centres". Archived from the original on 23 May 2010. Retrieved 27 February 2021.

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