Yoshihito, Prince Katsura

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Yoshihito
Prince Katsura
Prince Yoshi.jpg
Born(1948-02-11)11 February 1948
Tokyo, Japan
Died 8 June 2014(2014-06-08) (aged 66)
University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo, Japan
Burial 17 June 2014
Toshimagaoka Imperial Cemetery, Bunkyo, Tokyo
Full name
Yoshihito(宜仁)
House Imperial House of Japan
Father Takahito, Prince Mikasa
Mother Yuriko Takagi

Yoshihito, Prince Katsura(桂宮宜仁親王,Katsura-no-miya Yoshihito Shinnō, 11 February 1948 – 8 June 2014) was a member of the Imperial House of Japan and the second son of Takahito, Prince Mikasa and Yuriko, Princess Mikasa. He was a first cousin of Emperor Akihito. Originally known as Prince Yoshihito of Mikasa, he received the title Prince Katsura (Katsura-no-miya) and authorization to start a new branch of the Imperial Family on 1 January 1988 at age 39. He died of a heart attack on 8 June 2014, aged 66.

Imperial House of Japan members of the extended family of the reigning Emperor of Japan

The Imperial House of Japan, also referred to as the Imperial Family and the Yamato Dynasty, comprises those members of the extended family of the reigning Emperor of Japan who undertake official and public duties. Under the present Constitution of Japan, the Emperor is "the symbol of the State and of the unity of the people". Other members of the Imperial Family perform ceremonial and social duties, but have no role in the affairs of government. The duties as an Emperor are passed down the line to their children and so on.

Takahito, Prince Mikasa Japanese prince

Takahito, Prince Mikasa was a Japanese royal, member of the Imperial House of Japan. He was the fourth and youngest son of Emperor Taishō and Empress Teimei and was their last surviving child, the last surviving paternal uncle of Emperor Akihito. His eldest brother was Emperor Shōwa (Hirohito). After serving as a junior cavalry officer in the Japanese Imperial Army during World War II, the prince embarked upon a post-war career as a scholar and part-time lecturer in Middle Eastern studies and Semitic languages.

Yuriko, Princess Mikasa Japanese princess

Yuriko, Princess Mikasa, is a member of the Imperial House of Japan as the widow of Takahito, Prince Mikasa, the fourth son of Emperor Taishō and Empress Teimei. The Princess is the last surviving paternal aunt of the present emperor, Akihito, and currently is the oldest member of the Imperial Family, and the only living member who was born in the Taishō period.

Contents

Early life and education

Prince Yoshihito (second from right) with (from left to right) his brother Prince Tomohito, his mother Princess Mikasa, and his sister Princess Yasuko, c. 1950 Princess Mikasa and her children.jpg
Prince Yoshihito (second from right) with (from left to right) his brother Prince Tomohito, his mother Princess Mikasa, and his sister Princess Yasuko, c. 1950

The Prince graduated from the Department of Political Studies in the Faculty of Law of Gakushuin University in 1971. Between 1971 and 1973 he studied at the Graduate School of the Australian National University, in Canberra, Australia. After his return to Japan, he worked as an administrator at the Japan Broadcasting Corporation from 1974 to 1985.

Gakushuin University private university in Tokyo, Japan

Gakushūin University is a private university in Mejiro, Toshima Ward, Tokyo. It was re-established after World War II as an affiliate of the Gakushūin School Corporation. The privatized successor to the original Gakushūin University was established during the Meiji period to educate the children of the Japanese nobility. It is still one of the most prestigious universities in Japan, counting most of the members of the present Imperial Family among its former or present students. The average number of students is capped so that each student can receive personal attention from the staff.

Australian National University university in Canberra, Australia

The Australian National University (ANU) is a national research university located in Canberra, the capital of Australia. Its main campus in Acton encompasses seven teaching and research colleges, in addition to several national academies and institutes.

Canberra capital city of Australia

Canberra is the capital city of Australia. With a population of 410,301, it is Australia's largest inland city and the eighth-largest city overall. The city is located at the northern end of the Australian Capital Territory (ACT), 280 km (170 mi) south-west of Sydney, and 660 km (410 mi) north-east of Melbourne. A resident of Canberra is known as a Canberran. Although Canberra is the capital and seat of government, many federal government ministries have secondary seats in state capital cities, as do the Governor-General and the Prime Minister.

Public service

In 1982, the Prince returned to Australia as part of the Japanese delegation in honor of the tenth anniversary of the Australia-Japan Society. He also visited New Zealand to strengthen ties and friendly diplomatic relations. Despite his disabilities following a series of strokes in 1988, he took an active role in public service, and appeared regularly at award ceremonies, diplomatic events, and as President of various charity organizations.

In July 1997, Prince Katsura again visited Australia, to help promote an exhibition of the traditional sport of sumo, with exhibition matches held in Sydney and Melbourne.

Sumo full-contact wrestling sport

Sumo is a form of competitive full-contact wrestling where a rikishi (wrestler) attempts to force his opponent out of a circular ring (dohyō) or into touching the ground with any body part other than the soles of his feet.

Sydney City in New South Wales, Australia

Sydney is the state capital of New South Wales and the most populous city in Australia and Oceania. Located on Australia's east coast, the metropolis surrounds Port Jackson and extends about 70 km (43.5 mi) on its periphery towards the Blue Mountains to the west, Hawkesbury to the north, the Royal National Park to the south and Macarthur to the south-west. Sydney is made up of 658 suburbs, 40 local government areas and 15 contiguous regions. Residents of the city are known as "Sydneysiders". As of June 2017, Sydney's estimated metropolitan population was 5,131,326, and is home to approximately 65% of the state's population.

Melbourne City in Victoria, Australia

Melbourne is the capital and most populous city of the Australian state of Victoria, and the second most populous city in Australia and Oceania. Its name refers to an urban agglomeration of 9,992.5 km2 (3,858.1 sq mi), comprising a metropolitan area with 31 municipalities, and is also the common name for its city centre. The city occupies much of the coastline of Port Phillip bay and spreads into the hinterlands towards the Dandenong and Macedon ranges, Mornington Peninsula and Yarra Valley. It has a population of approximately 4.9 million, and its inhabitants are referred to as "Melburnians".

Health issues and death

Prince Katsura suffered a series of strokes in May 1988 and had surgery for acute subdural hematoma. [1] Finally he became paralyzed from the waist down, forcing him to use a wheelchair. [2] Despite this, he remained active in public life and appeared regularly at award ceremonies, diplomatic events, and as president of various charity organizations. However, he had been hospitalized on and off since 2008 due to sepsis. [1] [2] In early 2014, the Prince was diagnosed with an unspecified illness that affected and deteriorated his heart. In the early morning hours of 8 June 2014, he suffered a massive heart attack, and despite best efforts he was pronounced dead at 10:50 AM local time. He was 66 years old. [3] [4] On 17 June 2014, the main funeral service for Prince Katsura, called "Renso no Gi", was held at Toshimagaoka Imperial Cemetery in Tokyo. [5] About 560 dignitaries including the members of Imperial Family attended the funeral. Prince and Princess Mikasa, Prince Katsura's parents, acted out the duty of chief mourners and his niece, Princess Akiko, hosted the ceremony. [6]

Subdural hematoma

A subdural hematoma (SDH), is a type of hematoma, usually associated with traumatic brain injury. Blood gathers between the inner layer of the dura mater and the arachnoid mater. Usually resulting from tears in bridging veins which cross the subdural space, subdural hemorrhages may cause an increase in intracranial pressure (ICP), which can cause compression of and damage to delicate brain tissue. Subdural hematomas are often life-threatening when acute. Chronic subdural hematomas, however, have a better prognosis if properly managed.

Wheelchair chair with wheels, used by people for whom walking is difficult or impossible due to illness, injury, or disability

A wheelchair is a chair with wheels, used when walking is difficult or impossible due to illness, injury, or disability. Wheelchairs come in a wide variety of formats to meet the specific needs of their users. They may include specialized seating adaptions, individualized controls, and may be specific to particular activities, as seen with sports wheelchairs and beach wheelchairs. The most widely recognised distinction is between powered wheelchairs ("powerchairs"), where propulsion is provided by batteries and electric motors, and manually propelled wheelchairs, where the propulsive force is provided either by the wheelchair user/occupant pushing the wheelchair by hand ("self-propelled"), or by an attendant pushing from the rear.

Sepsis life-threatening organ dysfunction triggered by infection

Sepsis is a life-threatening condition that arises when the body's response to infection causes injury to its own tissues and organs. Common signs and symptoms include fever, increased heart rate, increased breathing rate, and confusion. There may also be symptoms related to a specific infection, such as a cough with pneumonia, or painful urination with a kidney infection. In the very young, old, and people with a weakened immune system, there may be no symptoms of a specific infection and the body temperature may be low or normal, rather than high. Severe sepsis is sepsis causing poor organ function or insufficient blood flow. Insufficient blood flow may be evident by low blood pressure, high blood lactate, or low urine output. Septic shock is low blood pressure due to sepsis that does not improve after fluid replacement.

Significance

Prince Katsura never married and left no legitimate children. As his brothers only had daughters themselves, his death marked the end of his father's branch of the Imperial Family and also his own branch. As a result, the number of households in the Imperial family dropped to four, excluding those led by Emperor Akihito and Crown Prince Naruhito. He was survived by his parents. [7]

Titles and styles

Styles of
Prince Katsura
Katura no miya mon Japanese Crest of Katura no miya Yosihito.svg
Katura no miya mon
Reference style His Imperial Highness
Spoken style Your Imperial Highness
Alternative style Sir

Honours

National honours

Foreign honours

Honorary positions

Ancestry

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References

  1. 1 2 "Emperor's cousin, Prince Katsura, dies at 66". Japan Today. Retrieved 14 May 2015.
  2. 1 2 "Prince Yoshihito died". imperialfamilyjapan.wordpress.com. Retrieved 14 May 2015.
  3. "Japan's prince Katsura, cousin of Emperor Akihito, dies at 66". The Straits Times. Retrieved 14 May 2015.
  4. "Prince Katsura, cousin of Emperor Akihito, dies at 66". The Japan Times. Retrieved 14 May 2015.
  5. "Funeral held for Prince Katsura". The Japan Times. Retrieved 14 May 2015.
  6. "Funeral held for emperor's cousin, Prince Katsura". Japan Today. Retrieved 14 May 2015.
  7. Prince Katsura's death marks the end of his branch of the Imperial Family
  8. Italian Presidency Archived 28 September 2013 at the Wayback Machine ., S.A.I. Yoshihito di Mikasa Principe del Giappone