Yoshinori Kitase

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Yoshinori Kitase
Square-enix dissidia yoshinori-kitase.jpg
At the E3 in Los Angeles, California in 2009
Born (1966-09-23) 23 September 1966 (age 52)
NationalityJapanese
Alma mater Nihon University
Occupation Video game producer
Employer Square Enix

Yoshinori Kitase(北瀬 佳範,Kitase Yoshinori, born 23 September 1966) is a Japanese game director and producer working for Square Enix. He is known as the director of Final Fantasy VI , Chrono Trigger , Final Fantasy VII , Final Fantasy VIII and Final Fantasy X , and the producer of the Final Fantasy X and Final Fantasy XIII series. Kitase is an Executive Officer at Square Enix, the Head of Square Enix's Business Division 1 and part of the Final Fantasy Committee that is tasked with keeping the franchise's releases and content consistent. [1] [2] [3]

Square Enix Japanese video game company

Square Enix Holdings Co., Ltd. is a Japanese video game developer, publisher, and distribution company known for its Final Fantasy, Dragon Quest, and Kingdom Hearts role-playing video game franchises, among numerous others. Several of them have sold over 10 million copies worldwide, with the Final Fantasy franchise alone selling 144 million, the Dragon Quest franchise selling 78 million and the Kingdom Hearts franchise selling 30 million. The Square Enix headquarters are in the Shinjuku Eastside Square Building in Shinjuku, Tokyo. The company employs over 4300 employees worldwide.

<i>Final Fantasy VI</i> 1994 video game

Final Fantasy VI, also known as Final Fantasy III from its marketing for initial North American release in 1994, is a role-playing video game developed and published by Japanese company Square for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System. Final Fantasy VI, being the sixth game in the series proper, was the first to be directed by someone other than producer and series creator Hironobu Sakaguchi; the role was filled instead by Yoshinori Kitase and Hiroyuki Ito. Yoshitaka Amano, long-time collaborator to the Final Fantasy series, returned as the character designer and contributed widely to visual concept design, while series-regular, composer Nobuo Uematsu, wrote the game's score, which has been released on several soundtrack albums. Set in a fantasy world with a technology level equivalent to that of the Second Industrial Revolution, the game's story follows an expanding cast that includes fourteen permanent playable characters. The drama includes and extends past depicting a rebellion against an evil military dictatorship, pursuit of a magical arms-race, use of chemical weapons in warfare, depiction of violent, apocalyptic confrontations with Divinities, several personal redemption arcs, teenage pregnancy, and the continuous renewal of hope and life itself.

<i>Chrono Trigger</i> Role-playing video game

Chrono Trigger is a role-playing video game developed and published by Square for the Super Nintendo Entertainment System in 1995 that began the Chrono series. Chrono Trigger's development team included three designers that Square dubbed the "Dream Team": Hironobu Sakaguchi, the creator of Square's successful Final Fantasy series; Yuji Horii, a freelance designer and creator of Enix's popular Dragon Quest series; and Akira Toriyama, a manga artist famed for his work with Dragon Quest and Dragon Ball. In addition, Kazuhiko Aoki produced the game, Masato Kato wrote most of the story, while composer Yasunori Mitsuda wrote most of the soundtrack before falling ill and deferring the remaining tracks to Final Fantasy series-composer Nobuo Uematsu. The game's story follows a group of adventurers who travel through time to prevent a global catastrophe.

Contents

Biography

In July 1978, at the age of 11, Kitase watched the movie Star Wars for the first time and was deeply impressed with it. He later examined the making-of video to it and became interested in the creative process of the film industry. Kitase decided to attend the Nihon University College of Art and studied screenwriting and filmmaking. Although he enjoyed filming, he showed a much greater passion for post-production editing as he felt it allowed him to give the footage a completely new meaning and to appeal to the viewers' feelings. In his first year after the graduation, Kitase worked at a small animation studio that produced animated television programs and commercials. When he played Final Fantasy for the first time, he considered a switch to the game industry as he felt that it had potential when it came to animation and storytelling. [4] Despite having no software development knowledge, he applied at the game development company Square and was hired in 1990. In the ten years to follow, he gathered experience as an "event scripter", directing the characters' movements and facial expressions on the game screen as well as setting the timings and music transitions. He has compared this work to directing film actors. [5] Kitase continued directing cutscenes in spite of filling other roles in later projects; for example, he directed part of the event scenes in Final Fantasy VIII and was event planner for the Nibelheim section of Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII . [6] [7]

<i>Star Wars</i> (film) 1977 American epic space opera film directed by George Lucas

Star Wars is a 1977 American epic space-opera film written and directed by George Lucas. It is the first film in the original Star Wars trilogy and the beginning of the Star Wars franchise. Starring Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford, Carrie Fisher, Peter Cushing, Alec Guinness, David Prowse, James Earl Jones, Anthony Daniels, Kenny Baker, and Peter Mayhew, the film focuses on the Rebel Alliance, led by Princess Leia (Fisher), and its attempt to destroy the Galactic Empire's space station, the Death Star.

Nihon University private university in Japan

Nihon University, abbreviated as Nichidai (日大), is a private research university in Japan. Yamada Akiyoshi, the Minister of Justice, founded Nihon Law School, currently the Department of Law, in October 1889.

Screenwriting, also called scriptwriting, is the art and craft of writing scripts for mass media such as feature films, television productions or video games. It is often a freelance profession.

Yoshinori Kitase (right) and art director Isamu Kamikokuryo (left) at HMV's Final Fantasy XIII launch event in London in March, 2010. Isamu Kamikokuryo and Yoshinori Kitase.jpg
Yoshinori Kitase (right) and art director Isamu Kamikokuryo (left) at HMV's Final Fantasy XIII launch event in London in March, 2010.

When many players responded to the sci-fi world of Final Fantasy VII and Final Fantasy VIII by requesting a "simple fantasy world", Kitase tried to expand the definition of the word "fantasy" beyond that of a medieval European setting. This led to Southeast Asia being the backdrop for Final Fantasy X . [8] Kitase referred to Final Fantasy VII and its protagonist Cloud Strife as his favorite game and character, respectively. [9] In an interview, he said that he loves first-person shooters. [10] Kitase supervised the Final Fantasy VII: Technical Demo for PS3 . Final Fantasy creator Hironobu Sakaguchi feels that he "handed the torch to" Kitase as far as heading the series is concerned. [11]

<i>Final Fantasy VII</i> 1997 video game

Final Fantasy VII is a 1997 role-playing video game developed by Square for the PlayStation console. It is the seventh main installment in the Final Fantasy series. Published in Japan by Square, it was released in other regions by Sony Computer Entertainment and became the first in the main series to see a PAL release. The game's story follows Cloud Strife, a mercenary who joins an eco-terrorist organization to stop a world-controlling megacorporation from using the planet's life essence as an energy source. Events send Cloud and his allies in pursuit of Sephiroth, a superhuman intent on destroying their planet. During the journey, Cloud builds close friendships with his party members, including Aerith Gainsborough, who holds the secret to saving their world.

<i>Final Fantasy VIII</i> 1999 role-playing video game

Final Fantasy VIII is a role-playing video game developed and published by Square for the PlayStation console. Released in 1999, it is the eighth main installment in the Final Fantasy series. Set on an unnamed fantasy world with science fiction elements, the game follows a group of young mercenaries, led by Squall Leonhart, as they are drawn into a conflict sparked by Ultimecia, a sorceress from the future who wishes to compress time. During the quest to defeat Ultimecia, Squall struggles with his role as leader and develops a romance with one of his comrades, Rinoa Heartilly.

<i>Final Fantasy X</i> video game

Final Fantasy X is a role-playing video game developed and published by Square as the tenth entry in the Final Fantasy series. Originally released in 2001 for Sony's PlayStation 2, the game was re-released as Final Fantasy X/X-2 HD Remaster for PlayStation 3 and PlayStation Vita in 2013, for PlayStation 4 in 2015, Microsoft Windows in 2016, and for Nintendo Switch and Xbox One in 2019. The game marks the Final Fantasy series transition from entirely pre-rendered backdrops to fully three-dimensional areas, and is also the first in the series to feature voice acting. Final Fantasy X replaces the Active Time Battle (ATB) system with the "Conditional Turn-Based Battle" (CTB) system, and uses a new leveling system called the "Sphere Grid".

Works

ReleaseTitleSystemCredit(s)
1991 Final Fantasy Adventure Game Boy Game design, scenario
1992 Romancing SaGa Super Nintendo Entertainment System Field map design
1992 Final Fantasy V Super Nintendo Entertainment SystemField planner, event planner, scenario writer [12]
1994 Final Fantasy VI Super Nintendo Entertainment SystemDirector, event planner, scenario writer [12]
1995 Chrono Trigger Super Nintendo Entertainment SystemDirector, scenario writer [13]
1997 Final Fantasy VII PlayStation Director, scenario writer
1998 Ehrgeiz PlayStationFF VII staff
1999 Final Fantasy VIII PlayStationDirector, story, system designer, event scene direction [14] [6]
2001 Final Fantasy X PlayStation 2 Producer, chief director, scenario writer [15] [16] [17]
2002 Kingdom Hearts PlayStation 2Co-producer
2003 Unlimited Saga PlayStation 2Special thanks
2003 Final Fantasy X-2 PlayStation 2Producer
2004 Before Crisis: Final Fantasy VII Mobile phoneExecutive producer
2004 Kingdom Hearts: Chain of Memories Game Boy Advance Producer
2005 Romancing SaGa PlayStation 2Special thanks
2005 Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children FilmProducer
2005 Last Order: Final Fantasy VII AnimeExecutive producer
2005 Kingdom Hearts II PlayStation 2Co-producer
2006 Dirge of Cerberus: Final Fantasy VII PlayStation 2Producer
2006 Final Fantasy V Advance Game Boy AdvanceSupervisor
2006 Final Fantasy VI Advance Game Boy AdvanceSupervisor
2006 Dawn of Mana PlayStation 2Special thanks
2007 Heroes of Mana Nintendo DS Special thanks
2007 Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII PlayStation Portable Executive producer, event planner [7]
2008 Sigma Harmonics Nintendo DSProducer
2008 Dissidia: Final Fantasy PlayStation PortableProducer
2009 Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children Complete FilmProducer
2009 Final Fantasy: The 4 Heroes of Light Nintendo DSSpecial thanks
2009 Final Fantasy XIII PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, Windows Producer, Crystal Tools development staff (for PS3 & 360)
2010 Final Fantasy XIV WindowsCrystal tools
2010 The 3rd Birthday PlayStation PortableProducer
2011 Dissidia 012: Final Fantasy PlayStation PortableSpecial thanks
2011 Final Fantasy Type-0 PlayStation PortableProducer
2011 Final Fantasy XIII-2 PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, WindowsProducer
2012 Theatrhythm Final Fantasy Nintendo 3DS Special thanks
2013 Final Fantasy: All The Bravest iOS, Android Special thanks
2013 Lightning Returns: Final Fantasy XIII PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, WindowsProducer
2013 Final Fantasy X/X-2 HD Remaster PlayStation 3, PlayStation Vita, PlayStation 4, WindowsProducer (PS3, PS Vita), special thanks (PS4, Windows)
2014 Theatrhythm Final Fantasy: Curtain Call Nintendo 3DS Special thanks
2014 Final Fantasy VII G-Bike iOS, AndroidExecutive producer [2]
2015 Mobius Final Fantasy iOS, Android, WindowsProducer
2015 Final Fantasy: Brave Exvius iOS, AndroidSpecial thanks
2015 Dissidia Final Fantasy (2015 video game) Arcade Special thanks [18]
2016 Kingsglaive: Final Fantasy XV FilmSpecial thanks
2016 Final Fantasy XV PlayStation 4, Xbox One Special thanks, original producer [A]
2017 Final Fantasy XIV: Heavensward (Patch 3.56)Windows, PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, Mac OS X Special thanks
2017 Final Fantasy XIV: Stormblood Windows, PlayStation 4, Mac OS XSpecial thanks
2017 Itadaki Street: Dragon Quest and Final Fantasy 30th Anniversary PlayStation 4, PlayStation VitaSpecial thanks
2017 Final Fantasy Dimensions II iOS, AndroidSpecial thanks
2018 Dissidia Final Fantasy NT PlayStation 4Special thanks
2020 Final Fantasy VII Remake PlayStation 4Producer

Notes

Related Research Articles

Cloud Strife protagonist in Final Fantasy VII

Cloud Strife is a fictional character and the main protagonist of Square's 1997 role-playing video game Final Fantasy VII and several of its sequels and spin-offs. In Final Fantasy VII, Cloud is a mercenary claiming to be formerly of SOLDIER, a group of elite supersoldiers employed by the Shinra Electric Power Company, a megacorporation responsible for draining the life from the planet. Fighting against Shinra in the resistance group AVALANCHE, and driven by a feud with the primary antagonist, Sephiroth, Cloud learns to accept his troubled past and adapts to his role as a leader. Cloud reappears as the protagonist in the 2005 computer-animated sequel film, Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children, in which he fights a new threat to the world while dealing with a sickness that infected his body. He acts in a supporting role in other Compilation of Final Fantasy VII titles and is featured in several other games outside the Final Fantasy VII continuity. Additionally, he has been featured in Nintendo's Super Smash Bros. series, and the Kingdom Hearts series by Square Enix.

Sephiroth (<i>Final Fantasy</i>) character in Final Fantasy

Sephiroth is a fictional character and main antagonist in the role-playing video game Final Fantasy VII developed by Square. Character designer Tetsuya Nomura conceived and designed Sephiroth as an antagonist to - and direct physical opposite of - the game's main character, Cloud Strife. The character was voiced in Japanese by voice actor Toshiyuki Morikawa and in English by both Lance Bass in Kingdom Hearts and George Newbern in all his subsequent appearances, he will be voiced by Tyler Hoechlin in Final Fantasy VII Remake.

Chrono Break is a cancelled third mainline entry in the Chrono series of video games by Square. While never officially announced by the company, commentary from Chrono series developers Masato Kato, Hironobu Sakaguchi, and Takashi Tokita have confirmed early plans for the game, alongside a number of trademarks filed in the game's name. However, the game would ultimately go unproduced, with many members of the internal development team either moving on to Final Fantasy XI or leaving the company in favor of freelance work. The game elicited much commentary from the company and the video game press in the following years, though as of 2019, all trademarks had expired, with no announced plans to work on the game.

Aerith Gainsborough Character in Final Fantasy

Aerith Gainsborough, transliterated as Aeris Gainsborough in the English releases of Final Fantasy VII and Final Fantasy Tactics—is a player character in Square's role-playing video game Final Fantasy VII. She was designed by Tetsuya Nomura with influence from Yoshinori Kitase, Hironobu Sakaguchi and Yoshitaka Amano.

<i>Dirge of Cerberus: Final Fantasy VII</i> video game (2006)

Dirge of Cerberus: Final Fantasy VII is an action role-playing third-person shooter developed and published by Square Enix in 2006 for the PlayStation 2. It is part of the Compilation of Final Fantasy VII metaseries, a multimedia collection set within the universe of the popular 1997 video game Final Fantasy VII. The game is set three years after the events of the original game, and focuses on one of the game's playable characters, Vincent Valentine. In the story, Vincent is targeted by Deepground, a mysterious organization that plans to awaken a creature known as Omega, with the ability to destroy the Planet.

<i>Compilation of Final Fantasy VII</i> media franchise

The Compilation of Final Fantasy VII is a metaseries produced by Square Enix. A subseries stemming from the main Final Fantasy series, it is a collection of video games, animated features and short stories based in the world and continuity of Final Fantasy VII. Officially announced in 2003 with the reveal of Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children, the series' core products are three video games and one movie release. Alongside these are tie-in products and spin-offs including books, mobile games and an original video animation. Advent Children and the mobile title Before Crisis: Final Fantasy VII are a sequel and prequel to VII, respectively focusing on Cloud Strife, the original game's main protagonist, and covert operatives known as the Turks. Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII follows the story of Zack Fair, an important major character in VII, while Dirge of Cerberus: Final Fantasy VII, which acts as a sequel to Advent Children, follows Vincent Valentine, one of the original's optional characters.

Characters of the <i>Final Fantasy VII</i> series Wikimedia list article

Final Fantasy VII, a role-playing video game developed by Square and originally released in 1997, features a large number of fictional characters in both major and minor roles. VII has been followed by multiple sequels and prequels, grouped into the multimedia series Compilation of Final Fantasy VII: these include the 2004 mobile game Before Crisis, the 2005 movie sequel Advent Children, the 2006 shooter spinoff Dirge of Cerberus, and the 2007 action game Crisis Core. Other media include spin-off books and the original video animation Last Order. The setting of Final Fantasy VII is a world that has been described as an industrial or post-industrial science fiction setting. It is referred to as "the Planet" in most of the games, and was retroactively named "Gaia" in some Square Enix promotional material.

Kazushige Nojima is a Japanese video game writer and is the founder of Stellavista Ltd. He is best known for writing several installments of Square Enix's Final Fantasy video game series—namely Final Fantasy VII,Final Fantasy VIII,Final Fantasy X, Final Fantasy X-2, Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children, Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII and the Kingdom Hearts series. Nojima also wrote the original lyrics of Liberi Fatali for Final Fantasy VIII and both Suteki da Ne and the Hymn of the Fayth for Final Fantasy X.

Motomu Toriyama video game designer

Motomu Toriyama is a Japanese game director and scenario writer who has been working for Square Enix since 1994. He initially worked on cutscenes in Bahamut Lagoon and Final Fantasy VII. Toriyama started directing with Final Fantasy X-2 and has continued doing so with large-scale projects such as Final Fantasy XIII and its sequels Final Fantasy XIII-2 and Lightning Returns: Final Fantasy XIII. Since 2003, he has been directing his own team of scenario writers at the company. He is currently directing Mobius Final Fantasy and is a member of Square Enix's Business Division 1, and part of the Final Fantasy Committee that is tasked with keeping the franchise's releases and content consistent.

<i>Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII</i> video game

Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII is an action role-playing game developed and published by Square Enix for the PlayStation Portable. First released in 2007, the game is a prequel to the 1997 video game Final Fantasy VII and is a part of the metaseries Compilation of Final Fantasy VII, which includes other products related to the original game.

Daisuke Watanabe is a Japanese video game writer employed by Square Enix. He is mostly known for his work on the role-playing video game series Final Fantasy and the action RPG series Kingdom Hearts.

<i>Mobius Final Fantasy</i> 2015 video game

Mobius Final Fantasy is an episodic role-playing video game developed and published by Square Enix for iOS, Android, and Microsoft Windows. It was released in Japan in June 2015, and released internationally in August 2016. The player controls Warrior of Light (Wol), a man who wakes with amnesia in the world of Palamecia, and must help conquer the dark forces attacking its people. The game features gameplay elements from previous Final Fantasy titles, including leveling, exploration via standard navigation and fast-travel systems, and turn-based combat tied to a job system. Common themes were also drawn from the original Final Fantasy title, such as "warriors of light" and their fight against chaos and darkness.

<i>Final Fantasy VII Remake</i> upcoming video game

Final Fantasy VII Remake is an upcoming action role-playing game developed and published by Square Enix for the PlayStation 4. Split across multiple releases, the first part is scheduled for March 3, 2020. The game is a remake of the 1997 PlayStation game Final Fantasy VII, following mercenary Cloud Strife as he and eco-terrorist group AVALANCHE battle against the corrupt Shinra megacorporation and the rogue former Shinra soldier Sephiroth. Gameplay is planned to combine real-time action similar to Dissidia Final Fantasy with other strategic elements.

Tetsuya Nomura is a Japanese video game artist, designer and director working for Square Enix. He designed characters for the Final Fantasy series, debuting with Final Fantasy VI and continuing with various later installments. Additionally, Nomura has led the development of the Kingdom Hearts series since its debut in 2002 and was the director for the CGI film Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children.

Hironobu Sakaguchi game designer

Hironobu Sakaguchi is a Japanese video game designer, director, producer, writer, and film director. He is best known as creator of the Final Fantasy series, which he conceived the original concept for the first title Final Fantasy and also directed several later entries in the franchise, and has had a long career in gaming with over 100 million units of video games sold worldwide. He left Square Enix and founded the studio Mistwalker in 2004.

Final Fantasy is a media franchise created by Hironobu Sakaguchi, and developed and owned by Square Enix. The franchise centers on a series of fantasy and science fantasy role-playing video games (RPGs). The eponymous first game in the series, published in 1987, was conceived by Sakaguchi as his last-ditch effort in the game industry; the title was a success and spawned sequels. While most entries in the series are separate from each other, they have recurring elements carrying over between entries: these include plot themes and motifs, gameplay mechanics such as the Active Time Battle (ATB) system, and signature character designs from the likes of Yoshitaka Amano and Tetsuya Nomura.

References

  1. "Board of Directors". Square Enix. 2016.
  2. 1 2 "【インタビュー(完全版)】『ファイナルファンタジーVII Gバイク』 いま明かされる開発秘話". Famitsu. 27 June 2014. Retrieved 26 May 2015.
  3. "What Does Square Enix's Final Fantasy Committee Do?". Siliconera. 25 March 2014.
  4. https://www.gamesradar.com/uk/Everything-we-know-about-man-behind-final-fantasy-7-remake/
  5. 「ハリウッド映画に負けていますか?」 スクウェア・エニックスプロデューサー北瀬 佳範 (in Japanese). Kodansha. 25 November 2009. Retrieved 5 April 2013.
  6. 1 2 Studio BentStuff. Final Fantasy VIII Ultimania (in Japanese). Square Enix. p. 464.
  7. 1 2 Martin, Joe (26 April 2008). "Crisis Core: Interviewing Yoshinori Kitase". Interview. bit-tech . Retrieved 4 April 2011.
  8. "Beyond FINAL FANTASY – Interviews". FINAL FANTASY X Bonus DVD. Square Enix Co., Ltd . Retrieved 4 April 2011. Yoshinori Kitase: For Final Fantasy VII and VIII, the setting was sci-fi and many players responded by saying that they preferred a simple fantasy world. They seemed to have a fixed notion of what fantasy means to them, and to them, it consisted of a medieval European world. I wanted to change that idea. I wanted to expand the definition of what the players thought the word "fantasy" implied.
  9. "Yoshinori Kitase on FFXIII, FFVII and Dissidia". VideoGamer.com. 8 May 2009. Retrieved 1 July 2012.
  10. Cheng, Justin (19 May 2005). "E3 2005: Yoshinori Kitase Interview". IGN. Retrieved 19 July 2010.
  11. "Hironobu Sakaguchi and Hajime Tabata Discuss Their Passion for the Series and Behind-the-Scenes Episodes from the Final Fantasy XV Reveal Event". Famitsu. 13 May 2016.
  12. 1 2 Parish, Jeremy (24 February 2010). "Final Fantasy: Kitase's Inside Story". 1UP.com . UGO Networks . Retrieved 11 September 2010.
  13. "Procyon Studio: Interview with Masato Kato". Cocoebiz.com. November 1999. Archived from the original on 24 July 2011. Retrieved 3 June 2007.
  14. "Interview with Nomura, Kitase and Naora". Shūkan Famitsu . ASCII Corporation. 5 June 1998. Archived from the original on 23 February 2011. Retrieved 23 February 2011.
  15. "Interview: Final Fantasy X". Core Magazine. 6 March 2001. Archived from the original on 13 April 2001.
  16. "Interview with Final Fantasy X Developers". The Madman's Cafe. 19 January 2001. Retrieved 13 April 2013.
  17. Studio BentStuff. Final Fantasy X Ultimania Omega (in Japanese). Square Enix. pp. 192, 476.
  18. "Staff Credit".
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