Young Lochinvar

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Young Lochinvar
Directed by W.P. Kellino
Written by Walter Scott (poem)
Alicia Ramsey
Starring Owen Nares
Gladys Jennings
Dick Webb
Cecil Morton York
Cinematography Basil Emmott
Production
company
Distributed byStoll Pictures
Release date
October 1923
Running time
5,500 feet [1]
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageSilent
English intertitles

Young Lochinvar is a 1923 British silent historical drama film directed by W.P. Kellino and starring Owen Nares, Gladys Jennings, and Dick Webb. [2] The screenplay was based on Canto V, XII of the poem Marmion by Walter Scott.

Contents

Plot

In Scotland, a young knight, Lochinvar, insists on marrying Ellen, the woman he loves although she is betrothed to another. Undaunted, Lochinvar seeks Ellen at her wedding at Netherby Hall, to save her from a forced marriage. Asking first for a dance, he sweeps her off her feet onto his horse and rides away with her.

Cast

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References

Bibliography