Yukon–Koyukuk Census Area, Alaska

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Yukon–Koyukuk Census Area, Alaska
White Mountains NRA (16102401664).jpg
Map of Alaska highlighting Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Alaska
Map of USA AK full.png
Alaska's location within the U.S.
Established1980 [1]
Largest city Fort Yukon
Area
  Total147,805 sq mi (382,813 km2)
  Land145,505 sq mi (376,856 km2)
  Water2,300 sq mi (5,957 km2), 1.6%
Population (est.)
  (2018)5,327
  Density0.038/sq mi (0.015/km2)
Congressional district At-large
Time zone Alaska: UTC−9/−8

Yukon–Koyukuk Census Area ( /ˈjukɒnˈkjəkək/ ) is a census area in the U.S. state of Alaska. As of the 2010 census, the population was 5,588. [2] It has the largest area of any county or county-equivalent in the United States. It is part of the unorganized borough of Alaska and therefore has no borough seat. Its largest communities are the cities of Galena, in the west, and Fort Yukon, in the northeast.

U.S. state constituent political entity of the United States

In the United States, a state is a constituent political entity, of which there are currently 50. Bound together in a political union, each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a separate and defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the federal government. Due to this shared sovereignty, Americans are citizens both of the federal republic and of the state in which they reside. State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons restricted by certain types of court orders. Four states use the term commonwealth rather than state in their full official names. The term does not describe or provide for any specific political status or legal relationship when used by a state.

Alaska State of the United States of America

Alaska is a U.S. state in the northwest extremity of the United States West Coast, just across the Bering Strait from Asia. The Canadian province of British Columbia and territory of Yukon border the state to the east and southeast. Its most extreme western part is Attu Island, and it has a maritime border with Russia to the west across the Bering Strait. To the north are the Chukchi and Beaufort seas—southern parts of the Arctic Ocean. The Pacific Ocean lies to the south and southwest. It is the largest U.S. state by area and the seventh largest subnational division in the world. In addition, it is the 3rd least populous and the most sparsely populated of the 50 United States; nevertheless, it is by far the most populous territory located mostly north of the 60th parallel in North America: its population—estimated at 738,432 by the United States Census Bureau in 2015— is more than quadruple the combined populations of Northern Canada and Greenland. Approximately half of Alaska's residents live within the Anchorage metropolitan area. Alaska's economy is dominated by the fishing, natural gas, and oil industries, resources which it has in abundance. United States armed forces bases and tourism are also a significant part of the economy.

2010 United States Census 23rd national census of the United States, taken in 2010

The 2010 United States Census is the twenty-third and most recent United States national census. National Census Day, the reference day used for the census, was April 1, 2010. The census was taken via mail-in citizen self-reporting, with enumerators serving to spot-check randomly selected neighborhoods and communities. As part of a drive to increase the count's accuracy, 635,000 temporary enumerators were hired. The population of the United States was counted as 308,745,538, a 9.7% increase from the 2000 Census. This was the first census in which all states recorded a population of over half a million, as well as the first in which all 100 largest cities recorded populations of over 200,000.

Contents

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the census area has 147,805 square miles (382,810 km2), of which 145,505 square miles (376,860 km2) is land and 2,300 square miles (6,000 km2) (1.6%) is water. [3] The area is roughly the same size as the U.S. state of Montana or the country of Germany. The area is bigger than 47 of the 50 states, with only California, Texas and Alaska itself being bigger than the county size. Its population density, at 0.0449 inhabitants per square mile (0.0173/km2), is the lowest in the United States.

Montana State of the United States of America

Montana is a state in the Northwestern United States. Montana has several nicknames, although none are official, including "Big Sky Country" and "The Treasure State", and slogans that include "Land of the Shining Mountains" and more recently "The Last Best Place".

Germany Federal parliamentary republic in central-western Europe

Germany, officially the Federal Republic of Germany, is a country in Central and Western Europe, lying between the Baltic and North Seas to the north and the Alps, Lake Constance and the High Rhine to the south. It borders Denmark to the north, Poland and the Czech Republic to the east, Austria and Switzerland to the south, France to the southwest, and Luxembourg, Belgium and the Netherlands to the west.

California State of the United States of America

California is a state in the Pacific Region of the United States. With 39.6 million residents across a total area of about 163,696 square miles (423,970 km2), California is the most populous U.S. state and the third-largest by area. The state capital is Sacramento. The Greater Los Angeles Area and the San Francisco Bay Area are the nation's second- and fifth-most populous urban regions, with 18.7 million and 9.7 million residents respectively. Los Angeles is California's most populous city, and the country's second-most populous, after New York City. California also has the nation's most populous county, Los Angeles County, and its largest county by area, San Bernardino County. The City and County of San Francisco is both the country's second-most densely populated major city after New York City and the fifth-most densely populated county, behind only four of the five New York City boroughs.

Adjacent boroughs and census areas

North Slope Borough, Alaska Borough in the United States

North Slope Borough, established in 1972, is an Alaskan borough bounded on the south by the Brooks Range and located largely in the North Slope region of the U.S. state of Alaska. It is the northernmost formal community on the North American continent. As of the 2010 census, the population was 9,430. The borough seat is Utqiagvik. The mayor is Harry K. Brower, Jr., first elected in a special election in July 2016 after recall of the previous mayor by an April 2016 election.

Southeast Fairbanks Census Area, Alaska Census area in the United States

Southeast Fairbanks Census Area is a census area located in the U.S. state of Alaska. As of the 2010 census, the population was 7,029. It is part of the unorganized borough and therefore has no borough seat. Its largest communities are Deltana and Tok, both unincorporated CDPs.

Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska Borough in the United States

The Fairbanks North Star Borough is a borough located in the state of Alaska. As of the 2010 census, the population was 97,581. The borough seat is Fairbanks. The borough's land area is slightly smaller than that of the state of New Jersey.

National protected areas

Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is a national wildlife refuge in northeastern Alaska, United States. It consists of 19,286,722 acres (78,050.59 km2) in the Alaska North Slope region. It is the largest national wildlife refuge in the country, slightly larger than the Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge. The refuge is administered from offices in Fairbanks. The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is the biggest and the wildest land publicly owned by the United States. ANWR includes a large variety of species of plants and animals, such as polar bears, caribou, wolves, eagles, and migratory birds, which rely on the refuge.

Mollie Beattie Wilderness

The Mollie Beattie Wilderness is located in the northeastern section of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. It is the second-largest designated wilderness area in the United States, after the Wrangell-Saint Elias Wilderness. It has an area of approximately 8,000,000 acres (3,200,000 ha), and comprises over 40 percent of the area of Arctic NWR. Its territory is centered about a part of the Brooks Range that contains a combination of arctic, subarctic, and alpine ecosystems. Animal life is abundant, including that of large mammals such as brown bears, moose, caribou, musk oxen, and (offshore) polar bears and numerous species of whales and seals. The wilderness is named after conservationist Mollie Beattie, the first female director of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service.

Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve national park of the United States

Gates of the Arctic National Park and Preserve is an American national park that protects portions of the Brooks Range in northern Alaska. The park is the northernmost national park in the United States, situated entirely north of the Arctic Circle. The park is the second largest in the US at 8,472,506 acres, slightly larger in area than Belgium. Gates of the Arctic was initially designated as a national monument on December 1, 1978, before being redesignated as a national park and preserve upon passage of the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act in 1980. A large part of the park has additional protection as the Gates of the Arctic Wilderness which covers 7,167,192 acres (2,900,460 ha). The wilderness area adjoins the Noatak Wilderness and together they form the largest contiguous wilderness in the United States.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1960 4,097
1970 4,75216.0%
1980 7,87365.7%
1990 8,4787.7%
2000 6,551−22.7%
2010 5,588−14.7%
Est. 20185,327 [4] −4.7%
U.S. Decennial Census [5]
1790–1960 [6] 1900–1990 [7]
1990–2000 [8] 2010–2018 [2]

As of the census [9] of 2000, there were 6,551 people, 2,309 households, and 1,480 families residing in the census area. The population density was 22.3 square miles (57.7km2) per person. It is the least densely populated county-equivalent of all 3,141 county-equivalents of the United States. There were 3,917 housing units at an average density of 0.027 per square mile (0.010/km2). The racial makeup of the census area was 24.27% White, 0.09% Black or African American, 70.89% Native American, 0.37% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.43% from other races, and 3.91% from two or more races. 1.19% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 12.95% reported speaking an Athabaskan language at home; of these 35.26% speak Gwich’in and 10.94% speak Koyukon. [10] [ clarification needed ]

Census Acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population

A census is the procedure of systematically acquiring and recording information about the members of a given population. This term is used mostly in connection with national population and housing censuses; other common censuses include agriculture, business, and traffic censuses. The United Nations defines the essential features of population and housing censuses as "individual enumeration, universality within a defined territory, simultaneity and defined periodicity", and recommends that population censuses be taken at least every 10 years. United Nations recommendations also cover census topics to be collected, official definitions, classifications and other useful information to co-ordinate international practice.

Population density A measurement of population numbers per unit area or volume

Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume; it is a quantity of type number density. It is frequently applied to living organisms, and most of the time to humans. It is a key geographical term. In simple terms population density refers to the number of people living in an area per kilometer square.

Koyukon is the geographically most widespread Athabascan language spoken in Alaska. The Athabaskan language is spoken along the Koyukuk and the middle Yukon River in western interior Alaska. In 2007, the language had approximately 300 speakers, who were generally older adults bilingual in English. The total Koyukon ethnic population was 2,300.

There were 2,309 households out of which 38.90% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 36.90% were married couples living together, 16.90% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.90% were non-families. 30.50% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.20% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.81 and the average family size was 3.53.

Marriage Social union or legal contract between people called spouses that creates kinship

Marriage, also called matrimony or wedlock, is a culturally recognised union between people, called spouses, that establishes rights and obligations between them, as well as between them and their children, and between them and their in-laws. The definition of marriage varies around the world not only between cultures and between religions, but also throughout the history of any given culture and religion, evolving to both expand and constrict in who and what is encompassed, but typically it is principally an institution in which interpersonal relationships, usually sexual, are acknowledged or sanctioned. In some cultures, marriage is recommended or considered to be compulsory before pursuing any sexual activity. When defined broadly, marriage is considered a cultural universal. Article 16 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights declares that "Men and women of full age, without any limitation due to race, nationality or religion, have the right to marry and to found a family. They are entitled to equal rights as to marriage, during marriage and at its dissolution. Marriage shall be entered into only with the free and full consent of the intending spouses."

In the census area, the population was spread out with 35.00% under the age of 18, 8.70% from 18 to 24, 26.90% from 25 to 44, 22.10% from 45 to 64, and 7.30% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females, there were 118.60 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 122.60 males.

Communities

Cities

Census-designated places

Education

Galena City School District operates public schools serving Galena. Nenana City School District operates public schools serving Nenana. Yukon–Koyukuk School District and Yukon Flats School District operate public schools serving rural areas.

See also

Related Research Articles

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Koyukuk National Wildlife Refuge

The Koyukuk National Wildlife Refuge is a 3,500,000-acre (14,000 km2) conservation area in Alaska. It lies within the floodplain of the Koyukuk River, in a basin that extends from the Yukon River to the Purcell Mountains and the foothills of the Brooks Range. This region of wetlands is home to fish, waterfowl, beaver and Alaskan moose, and wooded lowlands where two species of fox, bears, wolf packs, Canadian lynx and marten prowl.

References

  1. In 1980, the United States Census Bureau divided the Unorganized Borough into 12 census areas.
  2. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on May 19, 2014. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  3. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Archived from the original on May 27, 2002. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  4. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved May 12, 2019.
  5. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on March 2, 2013. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  6. "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Archived from the original on August 11, 2012. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  7. "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 1, 2014. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  8. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 18, 2014. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  9. "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on September 11, 2013. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  10. "Yukon–Koyukuk (CA) County, Alaska: Language Use". Archived from the original on July 22, 2011. Retrieved October 14, 2011.[ failed verification ]

Coordinates: 65°17′N151°39′W / 65.29°N 151.65°W / 65.29; -151.65