Yurtec Stadium Sendai

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Yurtec Stadium Sendai
Sendaistadium2.JPG
Yurtec Stadium Sendai
Former namesSendai Stadium (1997–2006)
Location Flag of Japan.svg Sendai, Japan
Coordinates 38°19′9″N140°52′55″E / 38.31917°N 140.88194°E / 38.31917; 140.88194
Public transit Sendai Subway :
Namboku Line at Izumi-Chūō
OwnerSendai City
OperatorSendai City Park Association
Capacity 19,694
Field size139 x 79 m
SurfaceGrass
OpenedJune 1997
Tenants
Vegalta Sendai (J. League)
Sony Sendai F.C. (JFL)

Yurtec Stadium Sendai (ユアテックスタジアム仙台) is a football stadium in the Nanakita Park, Izumi-ku, Sendai City, Miyagi Prefecture, Japan. It was built in 1997 and is home to the J. League club Vegalta Sendai and the Japan Football League club Sony Sendai F.C.. The stadium was specifically designed for football, and the stands are arranged close to the pitch. For games where the spectator capacity is insufficient, nearby Miyagi Stadium is occasionally used as a substitute.

Contents

History

The naming rights for the stadium were sold beginning on March 1, 2006 until February 28, 2009. In that period, the stadium is officially known as Yurtec STADIUM SENDAI (ユアテックスタジアム仙台, Yuatekku Sutajiamu Sendai).

In 2009, the turf were replaced, and Vegalta played the first half of the season at Miyagi Stadium. [1]

The stadium was damaged after the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and tsunami. [2]

International matches

Football

Italy used the stadium as their base for training camp during the 2002 World Cup, and cast images of the team members footprints are on display outside the stadium.

The Sendai Cup (An international youth football tournament) has been held annually since 2003. Italy, France Brazil, and Croatia have participated, along with the hosts, Japan.

Exhibition matches between Vegalta Sendai and A.C. ChievoVerona and S.S. Lazio have been played at Sendai Stadium as well. The match with Chievo in 2003 was the final club game for Oliver Bierhoff. [3]

Rugby

On June 16, 2007, the stadium was the venue for Japan vs. Samoa in the 2007 IRB Pacific Nations Cup. It was the first time an international rugby game had been played in the Tōhoku region.

On June 15, 2008, Japan defeated Tonga 35–13 at the stadium in the 2008 IRB Pacific Nations Cup.

Access

Related Research Articles

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References

  1. 仙台―広島戦宮スタが会場 (in Japanese). 河北新報. 2008-04-08. Archived from the original on April 12, 2008. Retrieved 2008-04-08.
  2. "Japan cancels all March games in top soccer league". Yahoo! Sports. 2011-03-14. Retrieved 2011-03-14.
  3. "Japan stars tune up for internationals". Soccerway. 2004-06-03. Retrieved 2008-04-08.