Yvon Durelle

Last updated
Yvon Durelle
Yvon Durelle.jpg
Statistics
Nickname(s)The Fighting Fisherman
Weight(s) Middleweight
Light Heavyweight
Heavyweight
Height5 ft 9+12 in (1.77 m)
Reach70 in (178 cm)
Nationality Canadian
Born(1929-10-14)October 14, 1929
Baie-Sainte-Anne, New Brunswick, Canada
DiedJanuary 6, 2007(2007-01-06) (aged 77)
Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada
Stance Orthodox
Boxing record
Total fights115
Wins88
Wins by KO49
Losses24
Draws2
No contests1

Yvon Durelle (October 14, 1929 January 6, 2007), was an Acadian Canadian champion boxer.

Contents

Early life

From a family of fourteen children, Yvon Durelle grew up in Baie-Ste-Anne, a small Acadian fishing village on Miramichi Bay on the Atlantic coast. Like many others of his generation, he left school at an early age to work on a fishing boat. In his spare time, Durelle liked to box and while still working in the fishery, he began prize fighting on weekends.

Career

Billed as The Fighting Fisherman, Durelle began his professional career in 1948, boxing at various venues around the province of New Brunswick. By August 1950, Yvon showed only one defeat in twenty three starts, the lone blemish a loss by disqualification, to Billy Snowball. Over time he was gaining a reputation as a tough opponent with a hard punch. A large fan following in Chatham, one in Newcastle and as well in Fredericton resulted in a groundswell of popularity as his victories eventually made him one of the top ranked middleweight fighters in Canada. [1]

Championship years

In May 1953, Durelle won the Canadian middleweight championship. He defended his title, winning 8 straight bouts. He moved up in weight class to fight in the light heavyweight division.

Light Heavyweight

In his first fight against a heavier and stronger opponent, he defeated the Canadian champion to take the light-heavyweight title. The following year, he fought outside his native Canada for the first time, going to Brooklyn, New York to fight Floyd Patterson, an up-and-coming American Golden Gloves champion. Outpointed in 8 rounds by the man who soon became the heavyweight champion of the world, Durelle's strong performance in a losing cause against Patterson gained him wide respect in the international boxing world.

In New York City in March 1957, Durelle broke into the top ten world rankings with a 10-round decision over Angelo Defendis. In May he won the British Empire light-heavyweight championship and the following month fought the top-ranked contender in the world, Tony Anthony. In a fight most experts say he won handily, Durelle was given only a draw against the heavily favored Anthony but it elevated him to the number 3 ranking in the world. He became a much talked about sports personality in his native country after he beat the German champion, Willi Besmanoff. In 1958, he defeated Clarence Hinnant, regarded by many as one of the best all around boxers of the time. The victory provided Durelle with the opportunity for his first chance to fight for a world title.

Light Heavyweight Title Fight

Yvon Durelle's light-heavyweight championship fight against the great Archie Moore on December 10, 1958 at the Forum in Montreal, Quebec, is one of the most memorable fights in boxing history. Listed as a 4-to-1 underdog, the bout made Yvon Durelle a legend in Canada, gaining him near cult status for his performance. In one of the first fights broadcast coast-to-coast on American television, Durelle stunned boxing patrons by knocking the champion down 3 times in the first round. Under boxing rules today (except those of the World Boxing Council), the fight would have been stopped after three knockdowns in one round and Yvon Durelle would have been world champion. Also, he missed an opportunity when, after the first knockdown, he stood over Moore watching for several seconds before returning to his corner. As a result of his delay, the referee had to wait to begin the count, and Moore made it to his feet at the count of nine. Durelle would have likely won if he went to his corner. Durelle swarmed all over the champion for four more rounds and knocked him to the canvas again in round five but Moore held on and eventually wore Durelle down to retain his world championship with an eleventh-round knockout. The fight was the talk of the boxing world and members of the Canadian press voted it the sporting event of the year. In an interview in 1994, Archie Moore, upon recounting the fight still hailed as classic, had this to say: "As the fight wore on and I got stronger, I thought to myself that this fella was the toughest man I'd ever fought. I turned professional in 1936 and fought until 1965--229 bouts. And I still think Durelle was the toughest man I ever faced." [2]

From Boxing to Wrestling and back

Six months later, in June 1959, at Durelle's home village of Baie-Ste-Anne, thirty-five fishermen died when they were swept out to sea by 40-foot tidal waves that pounded the wharf. Distraught at the loss of friends and relatives, in August he lost in a world title fight rematch with Archie Moore by a third-round knockout. In November of that year he lost in 12 rounds to the Canadian heavyweight champion, George Chuvalo. Durelle fought only a few more times, before taking up professional wrestling in 1961. He returned to boxing in 1963 winning twice more before retiring permanently. He continued to earn a living at wrestling, primarily in eastern Canada but on occasion with Stu Hart's Stampede Wrestling, in Calgary, Alberta.

Later life and death

Despite his size and brutal profession, Durelle is often referred to as a modest and gentle man (his nickname was "doux", meaning "soft"). However, in the 1970s an event profoundly impacted him and his family when, in a bar that he owned and operated, he shot and killed a man who had attacked him. Charged with murder, he was defended by a young lawyer by the name of Frank McKenna and was acquitted on the grounds of self-defence. The trial received massive and sustained publicity and McKenna eventually went into politics and was elected premier of the province of New Brunswick.

Retired in his native village, a small museum with souvenirs of his twenty-year boxing career was built attached to his home where he and his wife of more than fifty years greeted fans who still showed up to see the New Brunswick boxer. In an article for ESPN.com about the most memorable matches in boxing history, current-day referee Mills Lane said: "I don't think you'll ever see a fight like Durelle-Moore again...That fight transcended what great fights are."

Durelle incurred a stroke on December 25, 2006, and died at age 77 on January 6, 2007, at the Moncton Hospital in Moncton, New Brunswick. He also had Parkinson's disease prior to this. His funeral was held on January 11, 2007, from Ste-Anne Roman Catholic Church in Baie-Ste-Anne, New Brunswick.

Professional boxing record

87 Wins (48 Knockouts), 24 Losses (9 Knockouts), 2 Draws, 1 No Contest [3]
ResultRecordOpponentTypeRoundDateLocationNotes
Loss87-24-2 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Jean-Claude RoyPTS806/12/1964 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Montmagny, Quebec
Win87-23-2 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Phonse LaSagaTKO124/03/1963 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Trois-Rivieres, Quebec
Win86-23-2 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Cecil GrayKO725/02/1963 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Paul Sauve Arena, Montreal, Quebec
Loss85-23-2 Flag of the United States.svg Paul WrightPTS1015/09/1960 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Moncton, New Brunswick
Win85-22-2Flag placeholder.svg John ArmstrongKO422/06/1960 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Woodstock, New Brunswick
Win84-22-2 Flag of the United States.svg Ray BateyDQ915/06/1960 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Chatham, New Brunswick
Win83-22-2Flag placeholder.svg Emile DupreTKO326/05/1960 Flag of the United States.svg Brewer, Maine
Loss82-22-2 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg George Chuvalo KO1217/11/1959 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Maple Leaf Gardens, Toronto, Ontario Canada Heavyweight Title
Win82-21-2 Flag of the United States.svg Young Beau JackTKO923/10/1959 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Moncton, New Brunswick
Win81-21-2 Flag of the United States.svg Charlie JonesUD1028/09/1959 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Exhibition Grounds, Quebec City, Quebec
Win80-21-2 Flag of the United States.svg Al AndersonKO415/09/1959 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Chatham, New Brunswick
Loss79-21-2 Flag of the United States.svg Archie Moore KO312/08/1959 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Montreal Forum, Montreal, Quebec NYSAC/NBA World Light Heavyweight Titles.
Win79-20-2 Flag of the United States.svg Teddy BurnsTKO312/05/1959 Flag of the United States.svg General Carter State Armory, Caribou, Maine
Loss78-20-2 Flag of the United States.svg Archie Moore KO1110/12/1958 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Montreal Forum, Montreal, QuebecWorld Light Heavyweight Title.
Win78-19-2 Flag of the United States.svg Louis JonesKO202/10/1958 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Moncton, New Brunswick
Win77-19-2 Flag of the United States.svg Freddie Mack PTS1028/08/1958 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Moncton, New Brunswick
Win76-19-2 Flag of South Africa (1928-1994).svg Mike Holt RTD816/07/1958 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Montreal Forum, Montreal, QuebecCommonwealth Light Heavyweight Title.
Win75-19-2 Flag of France.svg Germinal BallarinUD1021/05/1958 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Montreal Forum, Montreal, Quebec
Loss74-19-2 Flag of the United States.svg Tony E. AnthonyTKO714/03/1958 Flag of the United States.svg Madison Square Garden, New York City
Win74-18-2 Flag of the United States.svg Clarence HinnantTKO631/01/1958 Flag of the United States.svg Madison Square Garden, New York City
Win73-18-2 Flag of the United States.svg Jerry LuedeeUD1011/12/1957 Flag of the United States.svg Fort Homer W. Hesterly Armory, Tampa, Florida
Win72-18-2 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Mario NiniKO422/11/1957 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Edmundston, New Brunswick
Win71-18-2 Flag of the United States.svg Floyd McCoyKO207/11/1957 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Moncton, New Brunswick
Win70-18-2 Flag of Germany.svg Willi Besmanoff UD1025/09/1957 Flag of the United States.svg Olympia Stadium, Detroit, Michigan
Win69-18-2 Flag of the United States.svg Tim JonesTKO829/08/1957 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Stadium, Moncton, New Brunswick
Win68-18-2 Flag of Germany.svg Guenter BalzerTKO815/08/1957 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Chatham, New Brunswick
Draw67-18-2 Flag of the United States.svg Tony E. AnthonyPTS1014/06/1957 Flag of the United States.svg Olympia Stadium, Detroit, Michigan
Win67-18-1 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Gordon Wallace KO230/05/1957 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Moncton, New BrunswickCommonwealth/Canada Light Heavyweight Titles.
Win66-18-1 Flag of the United States.svg Leo JohnsonTKO516/05/1957 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Moncton, New Brunswick
Win65-18-1 Flag of the United States.svg Angelo DeFendisMD1022/04/1957 Flag of the United States.svg St. Nicholas Arena, New York City
Win64-18-1 Flag of the United States.svg Clarence FloydTKO725/03/1957 Flag of the United States.svg St. Nicholas Arena, New York City
Loss63-18-1 Flag of the United States.svg Clarence HinnantTKO719/02/1957 Flag of the United States.svg Miami Beach Auditorium, Miami Beach, Florida
Win63-17-1 Flag of the United States.svg Bobby L. KingKO127/10/1956 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Fredericton, New Brunswick
Win62-17-1 Flag of the United States.svg Chubby WrightSD1004/10/1956 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Moncton, New Brunswick
Win61-17-1 Flag of the United States.svg Gary GarafolaKO120/09/1956 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Moncton, New Brunswick
Win60-17-1 Flag of the United States.svg Wilfred PicotTKO406/09/1956 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Lord Beaverbrook Rink, Saint John, New Brunswick
Win59-17-1 Flag of the United States.svg Alvin WilliamsUD1016/08/1956 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Moncton, New Brunswick
Win58-17-1 Flag of the United States.svg Wilfred PicotTKO419/07/1956 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Moncton, New Brunswick
Loss57-17-1 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Arthur HowardPTS1019/06/1956 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Clapton Greyhound Track, Clapton, London
Win57-16-1 Flag of the United States.svg Jerome RichardsonPTS1020/05/1956 Flag of Bermuda.svg Hamilton, Bermuda
Loss56-16-1 Flag of the United States.svg Artie TowneDQ728/11/1955 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Nottingham Ice Stadium, Nottingham, Nottinghamshire
Loss56-15-1 Flag of Trinidad and Tobago.svg Yolande Pompey TKO718/10/1955 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Harringay Arena, Harringay, London
Loss56-14-1 Flag of the United States.svg Jimmy SladeTKO803/09/1955 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Glace Bay, Nova Scotia
Win56-13-1 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Billy FifieldKO128/07/1955 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Moncton, New BrunswickCanada Light Heavyweight Title.
Loss55-13-1 Flag of the United States.svg Floyd Patterson RTD523/06/1955 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Newcastle, New Brunswick
Win55-12-1 Flag of Puerto Rico.svg Jimmy J. GarciaTKO816/06/1955 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Moncton, New Brunswick
Loss54-12-1 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Ron Barton DQ324/05/1955 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Royal Albert Hall, Kensington, London
Loss54-11-1 Flag of the United States.svg Art HenriPTS1210/12/1954 Flag of Germany.svg Sportpalast, Schoeneberg, Berlin
Loss54-10-1 Flag of Germany.svg Gerhard Hecht UD1012/11/1954 Flag of Germany.svg Sportpalast, Schoeneberg, Berlin
Win54-9-1 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Gordon WallaceUD1227/09/1954 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Glace Bay, Nova ScotiaCanada Light Heavyweight Title.
Win53-9-1 Flag of the United States.svg Bob IslerPTS1025/08/1954 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Newcastle, New Brunswick
Loss52-9-1 Flag of the United States.svg Paul AndrewsKO526/07/1954 Flag of the United States.svg St. Nicholas Arena, New York City
Win52-8-1 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Doug HarperUD1207/07/1954 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Newcastle, New BrunswickCanada Light Heavyweight Title.
Win51-8-1 Flag of the United States.svg Jerome RichardsonSD1023/06/1954 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Moncton, New Brunswick
Win50-8-1 Flag of the United States.svg Sampson PowellUD1009/06/1954 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Newcastle, New Brunswick
Win49-8-1 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Charley E. ChaseSD1004/06/1954 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Stadium, Moncton, New Brunswick
Win48-8-1 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Billy FifieldKO1024/05/1954 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Glace Bay, Nova Scotia
Loss47-8-1 Flag of the United States.svg Waddell HannaPTS1005/05/1954 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Chatham, New Brunswick
Loss47-7-1 Flag of the United States.svg Floyd PattersonUD815/02/1954 Flag of the United States.svg Boxing From Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, New York
Draw47-6-1 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Doug HarperPTS1227/01/1954 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Victoria Pavilion, Calgary, Alberta Canada Light Heavyweight Title.
Loss47-6 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Doug HarperSD1217/11/1953 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Victoria Pavilion, Calgary, AlbertaCanada Light Heavyweight Title.
Win47-5 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Gordon WallaceUD1215/10/1953 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Moncton, New BrunswickCanada Light Heavyweight Title.
Win46-5 Flag of the United States.svg Al WinnUD1030/09/1953 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Newcastle, New Brunswick
Win45-5 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Melvin WadeKO924/09/1953 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Moncton, New Brunswick
Win44-5 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Gordon WallaceUD1207/09/1953 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Glace Bay, Nova ScotiaCanada Light Heavyweight Title.
Win43-5 Flag of Cuba.svg Wilfredo MiroKO226/08/1953 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Sinclair Arena, Newcastle, New Brunswick
Win42-5 Flag of the United States.svg Curtis WadeTKO820/08/1953 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Moncton, New Brunswick
Win41-5 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Archie HanniganKO502/08/1953 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Glace Bay, Nova ScotiaClaim Maritime Light Heavyweight Title.
Win40-5 Flag of the United States.svg Joey GrecoTKO420/07/1953 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Chatham, New Brunswick
Win39-5 Flag of the United States.svg Curtis WadeSD1025/06/1953 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Moncton, New Brunswick
Win38-5 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Harry PoultonSD1219/06/1953 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Memorial Rink, Stellarton, Nova Scotia Canada Middleweight Title.
Win37-5 Flag of the United States.svg Tony AmatoKO620/05/1953 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Chatham, New Brunswick
Win36-5 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg George RossTKO1204/05/1953 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Glace Bay Forum, Glace Bay, Nova ScotiaCanada Middleweight Title.
Win35-5 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Jimmy NolanUD1009/10/1952 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Stampede Corral, Calgary, Alberta
Win34-5 Flag of the United States.svg Hurley SandersUD1024/09/1952 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Chatham, New Brunswick
Loss33-5 Flag of the United States.svg Hurley SandersUD1025/06/1952 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Chatham, New Brunswick
Win33-4 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Eddie ZastreUD1021/05/1952 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Chatham, New Brunswick
Win32-4 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Cobey McCluskeyTKO612/07/1951 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Moncton, New Brunswick
Win31-4 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Arnold FleigerKO220/06/1951 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Chatham, New Brunswick
NC31-4 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Cobey McCluskeyNC905/06/1951 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island
Win30-4 Flag of the United States.svg Bob StecherSD1023/05/1951 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Chatham, New Brunswick
Win29-4 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Tiger WarringtonPTS1010/12/1950 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Yarmouth, Nova Scotia
Win28-4 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Alvin UpshawKO705/11/1950 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Yarmouth, Nova Scotia
Loss27-4 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Cobey McCluskeyUD1022/10/1950 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Springhill, Nova Scotia
Win27-3 Flag of the United States.svg Al CoutureTKO625/08/1950 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Chatham, New Brunswick
Win26-3 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Ossie FarrellKO119/08/1950 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Moncton, New Brunswick
Loss25-3 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Cobey McCluskeyUD1014/08/1950 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island
Win25-2 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Tiger WarringtonUD1001/07/1950 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Moncton, New Brunswick
Win24-2Flag placeholder.svg Coot O'ReaKO218/06/1950 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Bathurst, New Brunswick
Win23-2 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Alvin UpshawTKO723/05/1950 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Chatham, New Brunswick
Loss22-2 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Roy WoutersPTS1020/01/1950 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Halifax, Nova Scotia
Win22-1Flag placeholder.svg Eddie HamiltonTKO325/11/1949 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Chatham, New Brunswick
Win21-1 Flag of the United States.svg Bob StecherUD1011/11/1949 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Chatham, New Brunswick
Win20-1 Flag of the United States.svg Ossie FarrellKO126/10/1949 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Chatham, New BrunswickEastern Canada Middleweight Title.
Win19-1 Flag of the United States.svg Bernard McCluskeyKO512/10/1949 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Chatham, New BrunswickEastern Canada Middleweight Title.
Win18-1Flag placeholder.svg Pat DavisKO218/09/1949 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Newcastle, New Brunswick
Win17-1 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Bill McLaughlinPTS826/08/1949 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Fredericton, New Brunswick
Win16-1 Flag of the United States.svg Kid WolfePTS1007/08/1949 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Chatham, New Brunswick
Win15-1 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Billy LandryPTS820/07/1949 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Chatham, New Brunswick
Win14-1 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Cobey McCluskeyPTS815/07/1949 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Newcastle, New Brunswick
Win13-1 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Jimmy MooneyUD806/07/1949 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Chatham, New BrunswickNew Brunswick Middleweight Title.
Win12-1 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Cobey McCluskeyPTS812/06/1949 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Baie-Sainte-Anne, New Brunswick
Win11-1Flag placeholder.svg Joe TyneKO130/05/1949 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Chatham, New Brunswick
Win10-1Flag placeholder.svg Manuel LeekKO617/05/1949 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Fredericton, New Brunswick
Win9-1 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Harry PoultonPTS820/04/1949 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Newcastle, New Brunswick
Win8-1 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Harry PoultonPTS623/03/1949 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Newcastle, New Brunswick
Win7-1 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Crosley IrvineTKO325/02/1949 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Chatham, New Brunswick
Win6-1Flag placeholder.svg Al BattenKO502/02/1949 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Newcastle, New Brunswick
Loss5-1 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Billy SnowballDQ407/12/1948 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Tracadie, New Brunswick
Win5-0Flag placeholder.svg Al BattenPTS803/12/1948 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Baie-Sainte-Anne, New Brunswick
Win4-0 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Percy R. RichardsonPTS411/11/1948 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Chatham, New Brunswick
Win3-0Flag placeholder.svg Al FraserPTS413/09/1948 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Chatham, New Brunswick
Win2-0Flag placeholder.svg Al FraserPTS425/08/1948 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Chatham, New Brunswick
Win1-0Flag placeholder.svg Sonny RamsayKO228/07/1948 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Chatham, New Brunswick

Awards and recognition

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Yolande Pompey was a boxer from Trinidad & Tobago. He beat his fellow countryman "Gentle" Daniel in 1950 and 1951. He lost to Bobby Dawson in 1954. He lost a fight to Archie Moore in a light heavyweight title fight June 5, 1956, at Harringay Arena. He knocked out German champion Gerhard Hecht in 1957. Pompey also fought Dick Tiger and knocked out Randy Turpin. Scottish champion Chic Calderwood was thought to have ended his career with a knockout that sent 29-year-old Pompey to the hospital. He beat Yvon Durelle, Moses Ward, and Dave Sands.

Leonard Sinclair Sparks was a welterweight boxer who won three Canadian boxing titles, including the Maritime welterweight championship, the Canadian junior welterweight championship, and the Canadian welterweight championship. Sparks was a switch hitter, who had power in both hands and finished his career with 28 wins, 10 losses, and 2 draws, including 17 knockouts. Sparks would appear on match cards in Madison Square Garden and the Boston Garden in the 1960s. He was also scheduled to appear in Madison Square Garden against Charley Scott of Philadelphia on the undercard of the first bout of Muhammad Ali vs. Floyd Patterson. The Muhammad Ali vs. Floyd Patterson bout would be relocated to the Las Vegas Convention Center, and Lennie would instead fight Charley Scott in the Boston Garden.

References

  1. Greig, Murray (1996). Goin' the Distance . Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Macmillan Canada. p.  126. ISBN   0-7715-7380-4.
  2. Greig, Murray (1996). Goin' The Distance . Toronto, Ontario, Canada: Macmillan Canada. p.  124. ISBN   0-7715-7380-4.
  3. "Yvon Durelle - Boxer". Boxrec.com. 2007-01-06. Retrieved 2014-06-20.
Achievements
Preceded by
Gordon Wallace
Commonwealth Light Heavyweight Champion
May 30, 1957 - 1958
Vacated
Vacant
Title next held by
Chic Calderwood