Zheng Haixia

Last updated
Zheng Haixia
Personal information
Born (1967-03-07) March 7, 1967 (age 54)
Shangqiu, Henan, China
NationalityChinese
Listed height6 ft 8 in (2.03 m)
Career information
WNBA draft 1997 / Round: 2 / Pick: 16th overall
Selected by the Los Angeles Sparks
Playing career1983–1998
Position Center
Career history
1997–1998 Los Angeles Sparks
FIBA Hall of Fame as player

Zheng Haixia (simplified Chinese :郑海霞; traditional Chinese :鄭海霞; pinyin :Zhèng Hǎixiá; born March 7, 1967) is a Chinese retired professional women's basketball player for the China women's national basketball team and the Women's National Basketball Association.

Contents

International career

In 1983, Haixia made her debut at the Basketball World Championship and finished 3rd. The following year, she and her teammates finished 1st in the Asian Junior Basketball Championship and 3rd in the 23rd Olympic Games.

In 1986, she led the Chinese team to fifth in the 10th World Championship, 1st in the Asian Games, and 2nd in the World Championship.

In 1992, she inspired her teammates to win the silver in the Barcelona Olympics. The following year, she won the East Asian Games, the World University Games and National Games.

In 1994, she claimed the titles in the Asian Championship and ranked 2nd in the World Championship, being named MVP of the event by averaging 26.4 points, 13.1 rebounds and shooting 83.5% from the field. [1]

One year later, she and her teammates retained their title in the 16th Asian Championship.

In 1996, she made her fourth Olympic appearance in Atlanta, Georgia, averaging 18.1 points, 9 rebounds. One year later, she won the 8th National Games with the PLA team.

WNBA career

In 1997 she retired from the Chinese national team and went to play with the Los Angeles Sparks in the WNBA in the United States. [2] At the end of 1998, she returned to China and began to coach the PLA women's team. She is currently a coach in China.

In 1997 Haixia received the Kim Perrot Sportsmanship Award becoming the first Asian woman as well as international player to win any award in the WNBA. She led the WNBA in field goal percentage at .618.

Career statistics

Legend
  GPGames played  GS Games started MPG Minutes per game RPG  Rebounds per game
 APG  Assists per game SPG  Steals per game BPG  Blocks per game PPG Points per game
 TO  Turnovers per game FG%  Field-goal percentage 3P%  3-point field-goal percentage FT%  Free-throw percentage
 Bold Career high°League leader

WNBA

Career totals

YearTeamGGSMINFGMFGAFTMFTA3PTM3PTAREBASTSTLTOBLKPTS
1997LA282155711017839590012317114620259
1998LA62982032570026306145
Totals342365513021044660014920115221304

Career averages

YearTeamMINFG%FT%3PT%RPGAPGSPGTOBPGPPG
1997LA19.9.618.661.0004.40.60.41.60.79.3
1998LA16.3.625.714.0004.30.50.01.00.27.5
Totals19.3.619.667.0004.40.60.31.50.68.9

Personal life

She started to practice basketball at the age of 12 and was selected by the Wuhan Army club team one year later. In 1983, she entered the national team. She married Xu Qinghua in Beijing on June 19, 2010. [3] [4]

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References

  1. The women's sports encyclopedia. Markel, Robert., Waggoner, Susan., Smith, Marcella (Marcella Ann) (1st ed.). New York: H. Holt. 1997. p. 15. ISBN   0-8050-4494-9. OCLC   36640667.CS1 maint: others (link)
  2. Friend, Tom (1997-06-19). "L.A. Imports Its Very Own Shaq". The New York Times. ISSN   0362-4331 . Retrieved 2020-04-23.
  3. "China's female Yao weds".
  4. "Haixia Zheng: Whatever Happened to the 1st Chinese WNBA Player?". stuarte. 2014-08-20. Retrieved 2020-04-23.