1830 United States Census

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1830 United States Census
  1820
1840  
Seal of the United States Census Bureau.svg
General information
CountryUnited States
Date takenJune 1, 1830 (1830-06-01)
Total population12,866,020

The United States Census of 1830, the fifth census undertaken in the United States, was conducted on June 1, 1830. The only loss of census records for 1830 involved some countywide losses in Massachusetts, Maryland, and Mississippi.

United States Census decennial census mandated by Article I, Section 2 of the United States Constitution

The United States Census is a decennial census mandated by Article I, Section 2 of the United States Constitution, which states: "Representatives and direct Taxes shall be apportioned among the several States ... according to their respective Numbers .... The actual Enumeration shall be made within three Years after the first meeting of the Congress of the United States, and within every subsequent Term of ten Years." Section 2 of the 14th Amendment states: "Representatives shall be apportioned among the several States according to their respective numbers, counting the whole number of persons in each State, excluding Indians not taxed." The United States Census Bureau is responsible for the United States Census. The Bureau of the Census is part of the United States Department of Commerce.

Contents

It determined the population of the 24 states to be 12,866,020, of which 2,009,043 were slaves. The center of population was about 170 miles (274 km) west of Washington, D.C. in present-day Grant County, West Virginia.

Washington, D.C. Capital of the United States

Washington, D.C., formally the District of Columbia and commonly referred to as Washington or D.C., is the capital of the United States. Founded after the American Revolution as the seat of government of the newly independent country, Washington was named after George Washington, first President of the United States and Founding Father. As the seat of the United States federal government and several international organizations, Washington is an important world political capital. The city is also one of the most visited cities in the world, with more than 20 million tourists annually.

Grant County, West Virginia county in West Virginia, United States

Grant County is a county in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 11,937. Its county seat is Petersburg. The county was created from Hardy County in 1866 and named for General Ulysses Simpson Grant.

This was the first census in which a city – New York – recorded a population of over 200,000.

New York City Largest city in the United States

The City of New York, usually called either New York City (NYC) or simply New York (NY), is the most populous city in the United States and thus also in the state of New York. With an estimated 2017 population of 8,622,698 distributed over a land area of about 302.6 square miles (784 km2), New York is also the most densely populated major city in the United States. Located at the southern tip of the state of New York, the city is the center of the New York metropolitan area, the largest metropolitan area in the world by urban landmass and one of the world's most populous megacities, with an estimated 20,320,876 people in its 2017 Metropolitan Statistical Area and 23,876,155 residents in its Combined Statistical Area. A global power city, New York City has been described as the cultural, financial, and media capital of the world, and exerts a significant impact upon commerce, entertainment, research, technology, education, politics, tourism, art, fashion, and sports. The city's fast pace has inspired the term New York minute. Home to the headquarters of the United Nations, New York is an important center for international diplomacy.

Census questions

The 1830 census asked these questions: [1]

Data availability

No microdata from the 1830 population census are available, but aggregate data for small areas, together with compatible cartographic boundary files, can be downloaded from the National Historical Geographic Information System.

In the study of survey and census data, microdata is information at the level of individual respondents. For instance, a national census might collect age, home address, educational level, employment status, and many other variables, recorded separately for every person who responds; this is microdata.

In statistics, aggregate data are data combined from several measurements. When data are aggregated, groups of observations are replaced with summary statistics based on those observations.

The National Historical Geographic Information System (NHGIS) is a historical GIS project to create and freely disseminate a database incorporating all available aggregate census information for the United States between 1790 and 2010. The project has created one of the largest collections in the world of statistical census information, much of which was not previously available to the research community because of legacy data formats and differences between metadata formats. The statistical and geographic data are disseminated free of charge through a sophisticated online data access system.

State rankings

RankStatePopulation
01New York1,918,608
02Pennsylvania1,348,233
03Virginia1,044,054
04Ohio937,903
05North Carolina737,987
06Kentucky687,917
07Tennessee681,904
08Massachusetts610,408
09South Carolina581,185
10Georgia516,823
11Maryland447,040
12Maine399,455
13Indiana343,031
14New Jersey320,823
15Alabama309,527
16Connecticut297,675
17Vermont280,652
18New Hampshire269,328
19Louisiana215,739
XWest Virginia [2] 176,924
20Illinois157,445
21Missouri140,455
22Mississippi136,621
23Rhode Island97,199
24Delaware76,748
XFlorida34,730
XArkansas30,388
XDistrict of Columbia [3] 30,261
XMichigan28,004
XWisconsin3,635

City rankings

RankCityStatePopulation [4] Region (2016) [5]
01 New York New York 202,589 Northeast
02 Baltimore Maryland 80,620 South
03 Philadelphia Pennsylvania 80,462 Northeast
04 Boston Massachusetts 61,392 Northeast
05 New Orleans Louisiana 46,082 South
06 Charleston South Carolina 30,289 South
07 Northern Liberties Pennsylvania 28,872 Northeast
08 Cincinnati Ohio 24,831 Midwest
09 Albany New York 24,209 Northeast
10 Southwark Pennsylvania 20,581 Northeast
11 Washington District of Columbia 18,826 South
12 Providence Rhode Island 16,833 Northeast
13 Richmond Virginia 16,060 South
14 Salem Massachusetts 13,895 Northeast
15 Kensington Pennsylvania 13,394 Northeast
16 Portland Maine 12,598 Northeast
17 Pittsburgh Pennsylvania 12,568 Northeast
18 Brooklyn New York 12,406 Northeast
19 Troy New York 11,556 Northeast
20 Spring Garden Pennsylvania 11,140 Northeast
21 Newark New Jersey 10,953 Northeast
22 Louisville Kentucky 10,341 South
23 New Haven Connecticut 10,180 Northeast
24 Norfolk Virginia 9,814 South
25 Rochester New York 9,207 Northeast
26 Charlestown Massachusetts 8,783 Northeast
27 Buffalo New York 8,668 Northeast
28 Georgetown District of Columbia 8,441 South
29 Utica New York 8,323 Northeast
30 Petersburg Virginia 8,322 South
31 Alexandria District of Columbia 8,241 South
32 Portsmouth New Hampshire 8,026 Northeast
33 Newport Rhode Island 8,010 Northeast
34 Lancaster Pennsylvania 7,704 Northeast
35 New Bedford Massachusetts 7,592 Northeast
36 Gloucester Massachusetts 7,510 Northeast
37 Savannah Georgia 7,303 South
38 Nantucket Massachusetts 7,202 Northeast
39 Hartford Connecticut 7,074 Northeast
40 Moyamensing Pennsylvania 6,822 Northeast
41 Springfield Massachusetts 6,784 Northeast
42 Augusta Georgia 6,710 South
43 Lowell Massachusetts 6,474 Northeast
44 Newburyport Massachusetts 6,375 Northeast
45 Lynn Massachusetts 6,138 Northeast
46 Cambridge Massachusetts 6,072 Northeast
47 Taunton Massachusetts 6,042 Northeast
48 Lexington Kentucky 6,026 South
49 Reading Pennsylvania 5,856 Northeast
50 Nashville Tennessee 5,566 South
51 Warwick Rhode Island 5,529 Northeast
52 Dover New Hampshire 5,449 Northeast
53 Hudson New York 5,392 Northeast
54 Roxbury Massachusetts 5,247 Northeast
55 Marblehead Massachusetts 5,149 Northeast
56 Middleborough Massachusetts 5,008 Northeast
57 St. Louis Missouri 4,977 Midwest
58 Plymouth Massachusetts 4,758 Northeast
59 Lynchburg Virginia 4,630 South
60 Andover Massachusetts 4,530 Northeast
61 Frederick Maryland 4,427 South
62 New London Connecticut 4,335 Northeast
63 Harrisburg Pennsylvania 4,312 Northeast
64 Schenectady New York 4,268 Northeast
65 Danvers Massachusetts 4,228 Northeast
66 York Pennsylvania 4,216 Northeast
67 Worcester Massachusetts 4,173 Northeast
68 Fall River Massachusetts 4,158 Northeast
69 Dorchester Massachusetts 4,074 Northeast
70 Beverly Massachusetts 4,073 Northeast
71 Trenton New Jersey 3,925 Northeast
72 New Bern North Carolina 3,796 South
73 Wilmington North Carolina 3,791 South
74 Carlisle Pennsylvania 3,707 Northeast
75 Easton Pennsylvania 3,529 Northeast
76 Elizabeth New Jersey 3,455 Northeast
77 Hagerstown Maryland 3,371 South
78 Columbia South Carolina 3,310 South
79 Fredericksburg Virginia 3,308 South
80 Mobile Alabama 3,194 South
81 Norwich Connecticut 3,135 Northeast
82 Middletown Connecticut 3,123 Northeast
83 Zanesville Ohio 3,094 Midwest
84 Dayton Ohio 2,950 Midwest
85 Steubenville Ohio 2,937 Midwest
86 Fayetteville North Carolina 2,868 South
87 Chillicothe Ohio 2,846 Midwest
88 Allegheny Pennsylvania 2,801 Northeast
89 Natchez Mississippi 2,789 South
90 Annapolis Maryland 2,623 South

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The demographics of Washington, D.C., also known as the District of Columbia, are ethnically diverse in the cosmopolitan capital city. In 2017, the District had a population of 693,972 people, for a resident density of 11,367 people per square mile.

References

  1. "Library Bibliography Bulletin 88, New York State Census Records, 1790-1925". New York State Library. October 1981. pp. 43 (p.49 of PDF).
  2. Between 1790 and 1860, the state of West Virginia was part of Virginia; the data for each states reflect the present-day boundaries.
  3. The District of Columbia is not a state but was created with the passage of the Residence Act of 1790. The territory that formed that federal capital was originally donated by both Maryland and Virginia; however, the Virginia portion was returned by Congress in 1846.
  4. Population of the 100 Largest Cities and Other Urban Places in the United States: 1790 to 1990, U.S. Census Bureau, 1998
  5. "Regions and Divisions". U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on December 3, 2016. Retrieved September 9, 2016.

Further reading