22nd century

Last updated
Millennium: 3rd millennium
Centuries:
Timelines:
State leaders:
Decades:
  • 2100s
  • 2110s
  • 2120s
  • 2130s
  • 2140s
  • 2150s
  • 2160s
  • 2170s
  • 2180s
  • 2190s

The 22nd (twenty-second) century is the next century in the Anno Domini or Common Era in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. It will begin on January 1, 2101, and will end on December 31, 2200.

Contents

Technological predictions

Social predictions

Climate change

Calendric predictions

Time capsules

Astronomical predictions

Solar eclipses

Lunar eclipses

Triple conjunctions

Transits and occultations

Other phenomena

See also

Related Research Articles

Eclipse Astronomical event where one body is hidden by another

An eclipse is an astronomical event that occurs when an astronomical object or spacecraft is temporarily obscured, by passing into the shadow of another body or by having another body pass between it and the viewer. This alignment of three celestial objects is known as a syzygy. Apart from syzygy, the term eclipse is also used when a spacecraft reaches a position where it can observe two celestial bodies so aligned. An eclipse is the result of either an occultation or a transit.

2031 (MMXXXI) will be a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2031st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 31st year of the 3rd millennium, the 31st year of the 21st century, and the 2nd year of the 2030s decade.

The 23rd century of the anno Domini or Common Era in the Gregorian calendar will begin on January 1, 2201 and end on December 31, 2300.

The 25th century in the anno Domini or Common Era of the Gregorian calendar will begin on January 1, 2401 and end on December 31, 2500.

The 27th century in the anno Domini or Common Era of the Gregorian calendar will begin on January 1, 2601 and end on December 31, 2700.

The 28th century in the anno Domini or Common Era of the Gregorian calendar will begin on January 1, 2701 and end on December 31, 2800. Unlike most century years, the year 2800 will be a leap year, and the next century leap year after 2400.

The 29th century in the anno Domini or Common Era of the Gregorian calendar will begin on January 1, 2801 and end on December 31, 2900.

In contemporary history, the third millennium of the anno Domini or Common Era in the Gregorian calendar is the current millennium spanning the years 2001 to 3000.

Solar eclipse of December 14, 2001 solar eclipse

An annular solar eclipse occurred on December 14, 2001. A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, thereby totally or partly obscuring the image of the Sun for a viewer on Earth. An annular solar eclipse occurs when the Moon's apparent diameter is smaller than the Sun's, blocking most of the Sun's light and causing the Sun to look like an annulus (ring). An annular eclipse appears as a partial eclipse over a region of the Earth thousands of kilometres wide. It was visible across the Pacific ocean, southern Costa Rica, northern Nicaragua and San Andrés Island, Colombia. The central shadow passed just south of Hawaii in early morning and ended over Central America near sunset.

Solar eclipse of September 22, 2006 solar eclipse

An annular solar eclipse occurred on September 22, 2006. A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, thereby totally or partly obscuring the image of the Sun for a viewer on Earth. An annular solar eclipse occurs when the Moon's apparent diameter is smaller than the Sun's, blocking most of the Sun's light and causing the Sun to look like an annulus (ring). An annular eclipse appears as a partial eclipse over a region of the Earth thousands of kilometres wide. The path of annularity of this eclipse passed through Guyana, Suriname, French Guiana, the northern tip of Roraima and Amapá of Brazil, and Southern Atlantic.

Solar eclipse of February 26, 2017 solar eclipse

An annular solar eclipse took place on February 26, 2017. A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, thereby totally or partly obscuring the image of the Sun for a viewer on Earth. An annular solar eclipse occurs when the Moon's apparent diameter is smaller than the Sun's, blocking most of the Sun's light and causing the Sun to look like an annulus (ring). An annular eclipse appears as a partial eclipse over a region of the Earth thousands of kilometres wide. February 26 is the 57th day of the year in Gregorian Calendar.

Solar eclipse of January 5, 2038

An annular solar eclipse will occur on January 5, 2038. A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, thereby totally or partly obscuring the image of the Sun for a viewer on Earth. An annular solar eclipse occurs when the Moon's apparent diameter is smaller than the Sun's, blocking most of the Sun's light and causing the Sun to look like an annulus (ring). An annular eclipse appears as a partial eclipse over a region of the Earth thousands of kilometres wide.

Solar eclipse of June 10, 2021 solar eclipse

An annular solar eclipse will occur on June 10, 2021. A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, thereby totally or partly obscuring the image of the Sun for a viewer on Earth. An annular solar eclipse occurs when the Moon's apparent diameter is smaller than the Sun's, blocking most of the Sun's light and causing the Sun to look like an annulus (ring). An annular eclipse appears as a partial eclipse over a region of the Earth thousands of kilometres wide. This eclipse will be unusual as the path of the annular eclipse will move to the north east (45°), then north (0°), north west (315°), west (270°), south west (225°), south (180°), and finally south east (135°) across the Arctic, while most eclipse paths move west to east. This reversal is only possible in polar regions. This eclipse is also notable for the fact that the path of annularity will pass over North Pole.

Solar eclipse of May 9, 2032

An annular solar eclipse will occur on May 9, 2032. A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, thereby totally or partly obscuring the image of the Sun for a viewer on Earth. An annular solar eclipse occurs when the Moon's apparent diameter is smaller than the Sun's, blocking most of the Sun's light and causing the Sun to look like an annulus (ring). An annular eclipse appears as a partial eclipse over a region of the Earth thousands of kilometres wide.

Solar eclipse of December 14, 1955

An annular solar eclipse occurred on December 14, 1955. A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, thereby totally or partly obscuring the image of the Sun for a viewer on Earth. An annular solar eclipse occurs when the Moon's apparent diameter is smaller than the Sun's, blocking most of the Sun's light and causing the Sun to look like an annulus (ring). An annular eclipse appears as a partial eclipse over a region of the Earth thousands of kilometres wide. Annularity was visible from French Equatorial Africa, Libya, Anglo-Egyptian Sudan including the capital city Khartoum, French Somaliland including the capital Djibouti City, British Somaliland including the capital city Hargeisa, the Trust Territory of Somaliland, the Maldives, Andaman and Nicobar Islands, Burma, Thailand including the capital city Bangkok, Cambodia, Laos, North Vietnam and South Vietnam, China, British Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Ryukyu Islands. It was the third central solar eclipse visible from Bangkok from 1948 to 1958, where it is rare for a large city to witness 4 central solar eclipses in just 10 years. This is the 20th member Solar Saros 141, and the last of first set of solar eclipses without a penumbral internal contact, the next event is the 1973 Dec 24 event, which is the first of 19 solar eclipses with a penumbral internal contact until 2298 Jul 09.

Solar eclipse of May 20, 2050

A total solar eclipse will occur on Friday, May 20, 2050. A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, thereby totally or partly obscuring the image of the Sun for a viewer on Earth. A total solar eclipse occurs when the Moon's apparent diameter is larger than the Sun's, blocking all direct sunlight, turning day into darkness. Totality occurs in a narrow path across Earth's surface, with the partial solar eclipse visible over a surrounding region thousands of kilometres wide. This eclipse is a hybrid eclipse, starting and ending as an annular solar eclipse.

Solar eclipse of October 24, 2060

An annular solar eclipse will occur on Sunday 24 October 2060. A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, thereby totally or partly obscuring the image of the Sun for a viewer on Earth. An annular solar eclipse occurs when the Moon's apparent diameter is smaller than the Sun's, blocking most of the Sun's light and causing the Sun to look like an annulus (ring). An annular eclipse appears as a partial eclipse over a region of the Earth thousands of kilometres wide.

Solar eclipse of November 4, 2078

An annular solar eclipse will occur on Friday, November 4, 2078. A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, thereby totally or partly obscuring the image of the Sun for a viewer on Earth. An annular solar eclipse occurs when the Moon's apparent diameter is smaller than the Sun's, blocking most of the Sun's light and causing the Sun to look like an annulus (ring). An annular eclipse appears as a partial eclipse over a region of the Earth thousands of kilometres wide. The path of annularity will cross Pacific Ocean, South America, and Atlantic Ocean. The tables below contain detailed predictions and additional information on the Annular Solar Eclipse of 4 November 2078.

This is a timeline of the near future, covering predicted or calculated events from the present until the end of the 23rd century.

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