Anno Domini (disambiguation)

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Anno Domini designates years since the traditional date of the birth of Jesus Christ.

Anno Domini Western calendar era

The terms anno Domini (AD) and before Christ (BC) are used to label or number years in the Julian and Gregorian calendars. The term anno Domini is Medieval Latin and means "in the year of the Lord", but is often presented using "our Lord" instead of "the Lord", taken from the full original phrase "anno Domini nostri Jesu Christi", which translates to "in the year of our Lord Jesus Christ".

Anno Domini may also refer to:

Anno Domini is a contemporary art gallery in San Jose, California. It was started by graphic designers Cherri Lakey and Brian Eder. Its strapline is "The second coming of Art and Design".

<i>Anno Domini High Definition</i> 2009 studio album by Riverside

Anno Domini High Definition is the fourth full-length studio album by Polish progressive rock band Riverside and also the first full length Riverside album that is separate from the Reality Dream suite. The album was released in Poland on 15 June 2009 through Mystic Production and was released worldwide on 19 June 2009 through InsideOut. The album was a commercial success in the band's home country of Poland where it reached the top of the official album chart. The art design and direction was, once again, handled by Travis Smith.

<i>Anno Domini 2000, or, Womans Destiny</i>

Anno Domini 2000, or, Woman's Destiny (1889) is usually regarded as New Zealand's first science fiction novel. It was written by former Prime Minister of New Zealand Sir Julius Vogel. It anticipated a utopian world where women held many positions of authority, and in fact New Zealand became the first country to give women the vote, and from 1998 to 2008 continuously had a female Prime Minister, while for a short period (2005–2006) all five highest government positions were simultaneously held by women.

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AD 1 Year

AD 1 (I), 1 AD or 1 CE is the epoch year for the Anno Domini calendar era. It was the first year of the Common Era (CE), of the 1st millennium and of the 1st century. It was a common year starting on Saturday or Sunday, a common year starting on Saturday by the proleptic Julian calendar, and a common year starting on Monday by the proleptic Gregorian calendar. In its time, year 1 was known as the Year of the Consulship of Caesar and Paullus, named after Roman consuls Gaius Caesar and Lucius Aemilius Paullus, and less frequently, as year 754 AUC within the Roman Empire. The denomination "AD 1" for this year has been in consistent use since the mid-medieval period when the anno Domini (AD) calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years. It was the beginning of the Christian/Common era. The preceding year is 1 BC; there is no year 0 in this numbering scheme. The Anno Domini dating system was devised in AD 525 by Dionysius Exiguus.

The proleptic Julian calendar is produced by extending the Julian calendar backwards to dates preceding AD 8 when the quadrennial leap year stabilized. The leap years that were actually observed between the implementation of the Julian calendar in 45 BC and AD 8 were erratic: see the Julian calendar article for details.

An epoch, for the purposes of chronology and periodization, is an instant in time chosen as the origin of a particular calendar era. The "epoch" serves as a reference point from which time is measured.

Year 1 BC was a common year starting on Friday or Saturday of the Julian calendar and a leap year starting on Thursday of the Proleptic Julian calendar. It is also a leap year starting on Saturday, in the Proleptic Gregorian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Lentulus and Piso. The denomination 1 BC for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years. The following year is 1 AD in the widely used Julian calendar, which does not have a "year zero".

Attila Csihar Hungarian singer

Attila Csihar, also sometimes known as Void, is a Hungarian extreme metal vocalist, best known for his vocal work in Norwegian black metal band Mayhem and American drone-doom project Sunn O))). Author Ian Christe describes his vocals as "operatic."

The Era of the Martyrs, also known as the Diocletian era, is a method of numbering years used by the Church of Alexandria beginning in the 4th century AD and by the Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria from the 5th century to the present. Western Christians were aware of it but did not use it. It was named for the Roman Emperor Diocletian who instigated the last major persecution against Christians in the Empire. Diocletian began his reign 20 November 284 during the Alexandrian year that began on 1 Thoth, the Egyptian New Year, or 29 August 284, so that date was used as the epoch: year one of the Diocletian era began on that date. This era was used to number the year in Easter tables produced by the Church of Alexandria.

Dominus or domini may refer to:

Year zero does not exist in the anno Domini system usually used to number years in the Gregorian calendar and in its predecessor, the Julian calendar. In this system, the year 1 BC is followed by AD 1. However, there is a year zero in astronomical year numbering and in ISO 8601:2004 as well as in all Buddhist and Hindu calendars.

Tormentor is a black metal band formed in 1986 in Budapest, Hungary. They recorded their first album, Anno Domini, in 1988, but were unable to release it until the end of communism. The album reached Norway through the tape-trading community. Following the suicide of Per Ohlin, Mayhem invited Attila Csihar from Tormentor to join the band; he was to perform the vocals on De Mysteriis Dom Sathanas. Tormentor split up in 1991. After a long break they reformed and released the more experimental Recipe Ferrum through Avantgarde Music in 2001, going on a long indefinite hiatus afterwards.

<i>Nightwing</i> (album) album by Marduk

Nightwing is the fifth studio album by Swedish black metal band Marduk. It was recorded and mixed at The Abyss between October and November 1997 and released in April 1998 by Osmose Productions. The theme of the album was blood, as the band's following studio albums Panzer Division Marduk would be war, and La Grande Danse Macabre would be death, forming a trilogy of "Blood, War and Death," Marduk's vision of what black metal is.

The Spanish era or era of Caesar was a dating system commonly used in the states of the Iberian Peninsula from the 3rd century until the 14th–15th centuries, when it was phased out in favour the Anno Domini system. Year one of this calendar era coincides with what is now as 38 BC, possibly the date of a new tax imposed by the Roman Republic on the subdued population of Iberia. Whatever the case, the date signifies the beginning of the Pax Romana in Iberia.

<i>Iubilaeum Anno Dracula 2001</i> 2001 EP by Theatres des Vampires

Iubilaeum Anno Dracula 2001 is the first EP by the Italian band Theatres des Vampires. The name of the album, as well as the logo in the cover art is a parody on the Great Jubilee of 2000.

Chakal is a thrash/black metal band from Belo Horizonte, Brazil. The band formed in 1985 and has to date released five albums through Cogumelo Records. Its debut record, Abominable Anno Domini, has been described as an "influential, genre-defining" example of Brazilian heavy metal.

Dale Marshall is a contemporary fine art painter currently residing in the Welsh countryside at the foothills of Snowdonia National Park.

Anno Domini (band)

Anno Domini are an Australian symphonic black, death metal band. Formed in 2005, the band's line-up as from 2016 was Michael Aldeguer on guitars, Amir Bukan on drums and keyboards, Dan Kendall on bass guitar, Danny Straughen on guitars and Andy Suppradit on vocals.