Brønnøy

Last updated
Brønnøy kommune
Bronnoysund Juni 2005.jpg
View of Brønnøysund
Norway Counties Nordland Position.svg
Nordland within
Norway
NO 1813 Bronnoy.svg
Brønnøy within Nordland
Coordinates: 65°28′33″N12°24′01″E / 65.47583°N 12.40028°E / 65.47583; 12.40028 Coordinates: 65°28′33″N12°24′01″E / 65.47583°N 12.40028°E / 65.47583; 12.40028
Country Norway
County Nordland
District Helgeland
Established1 Jan 1838
Administrative centre Brønnøysund
Government
  Mayor (2019)Eilif Trælnes (Sp)
Area
  Total1,046.01 km2 (403.87 sq mi)
  Land998.89 km2 (385.67 sq mi)
  Water47.12 km2 (18.19 sq mi)  4.5%
Area rank107 in Norway
Population
 (2020)
  Total7,917
  Rank131 in Norway
  Density7.9/km2 (20/sq mi)
  Change (10 years)
3.4%
Demonym(s) brønnøyværing [1]
Time zone UTC+01:00 (CET)
  Summer (DST) UTC+02:00 (CEST)
ISO 3166 code NO-1813
Official language form Neutral [2]
Website bronnoy.kommune.no

Brønnøy is a municipality in Nordland county, Norway. It is part of the Helgeland region. The administrative centre and commercial centre of the municipality is the town of Brønnøysund.

Contents

Torghatten seen from the south TorghattenFraSor.jpg
Torghatten seen from the south
Bjornholmene Bjornholmene.jpg
Bjørnholmene

A secondary centre is the village of Hommelstø. Other villages include Tosbotn, Lande, Trælnes, and Indreskomo.

The Brønnøysund Register Centre is an important employer in Brønnøy. Also, one of the largest limestone mines in Northern Europe is located in the municipality. Brønnøysund Airport, Brønnøy is located near the town of Brønnøysund.

The 1,046-square-kilometre (404 sq mi) municipality is the 107th largest by area out of the 356 municipalities in Norway. Brønnøy is the 131st most populous municipality in Norway with a population of 7,917. The municipality's population density is 7.9 inhabitants per square kilometre (20/sq mi) and its population has increased by 3.4% over the previous 10-year period. [3] [4]

General information

The municipality of Brønnøy was established on 1 January 1838 (see formannskapsdistrikt law). On 1 October 1875 the eastern district (population: 1,162) was separated to become the new municipality of Velfjord. This left Brønnøy with 4,156 residents.

Then on 1 January 1901, the southwestern district (population: 2,731) was separated to become the new municipality of Vik (which later changed its name to Sømna). Brønnøy was then left with 3,440 inhabitants. On 1 January 1923 the large village of Brønnøysund (population: 948) was separated from Brønnøy to become a town ( ladested ).

During the 1960s, there were many municipal mergers across Norway due to the work of the Schei Committee. On 1 January 1964, a major municipal merger took place. The following areas were merged to form a new, larger Brønnøy municipality.

Just thirteen years later on 1 January 1977, most of the former municipality of Sømna was separated from Brønnøy once again to become its own municipality. The Hongset area of the old Sømna municipality remained in Brønnøy. [5]

Name

The municipality (originally the parish) is named after the small island Brønnøya (Old Norse : Brunnøy), since the first church was built there. The first element is brunnr which means "well" and the last element is øy which means "island". Islands with freshwater wells were important for seafarers. [6]

Coat of arms

The coat of arms was granted on 20 May 1988. The arms have a yellow background with a black direction-sign used in the harbor to guide the ships. It symbolizes the importance of the harbor for the municipality. [7]

Churches

The Church of Norway has two parishes (sokn) within the municipality of Brønnøy. It is part of the Sør-Helgeland prosti (deanery) in the Diocese of Sør-Hålogaland.

Churches in Brønnøy
Parish (sokn)Church NameLocation of the ChurchYear Built
Brønnøy Brønnøy Church Brønnøysund 1870
Skogmo Chapel Indreskomo 1979
Trælnes Chapel Trælnes 1980
Velfjord og Tosen Nøstvik Church Velfjord 1674
Tosen Chapel Lande 1734
Torget island. The larger, round island northwest of Torget is the main island of the Vega archipelago. Norway - Torget.png
Torget island. The larger, round island northwest of Torget is the main island of the Vega archipelago.
View from inside the hole of Torghatten; the Strandflaten coastal lowland Strandflate Bronnoy.jpg
View from inside the hole of Torghatten; the Strandflaten coastal lowland

Geography

The municipality has great scenic variety with numerous islets, lakes (such as Eidevatnet, Sausvatnet, and Fjellvatnet), mountains, and some fertile agricultural areas. Torget island is connected to the mainland via the Brønnøysund Bridge.

Brønnøy borders the municipalities of Vega and Vevelstad to the north, Vefsn and Grane to the east, and Bindal and Sømna to the south. The large fjord Velfjorden runs into the heart of the municipality.

Nature

In the southwest is the island of Torget, with the mountain Torghatten, is famous for a cavity that goes straight through the structure. Lomsdal–Visten National Park is located in the northeastern part of Brønnøy.

The world's most northerly naturally occurring small-leaved lime (linden) forests grows in Brønnøy, and there are patches of boreal rainforests in Grønlidalen nature reserve [8] and Storhaugen nature reserve. [9] Strompdalen nature reserve [10] and Horsvær nature reserve, a nesting place for a rich variety of seabirds, are also located in the municipality.

Government

All municipalities in Norway, including Brønnøy, are responsible for primary education (through 10th grade), outpatient health services, senior citizen services, unemployment and other social services, zoning, economic development, and municipal roads. The municipality is governed by a municipal council of elected representatives, which in turn elect a mayor. [11] The municipality falls under the Brønnøy District Court and the Hålogaland Court of Appeal.

Municipal council

The municipal council (Kommunestyre) of Brønnøy is made up of 27 representatives that are elected to four year terms. The party breakdown of the council is as follows:

Brønnøy Kommunestyre 20202023 [12]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)7
  Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)1
  Conservative Party (Høyre)4
  Red Party (Rødt)2
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)11
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)1
  Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:27
Brønnøy Kommunestyre 20162019 [13]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)10
  Conservative Party (Høyre)4
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)6
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)1
  Liberal Party (Venstre)6
Total number of members:27
Brønnøy Kommunestyre 20122015 [14]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)10
  Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)1
  Conservative Party (Høyre)9
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)5
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)1
  Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:27
Brønnøy Kommunestyre 20082011 [13]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)4
  Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)2
  Conservative Party (Høyre)2
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)12
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)2
  Liberal Party (Venstre)2
  Brønnøy cooperative list (Brønnøy samarbeidsliste)2
Total number of members:27
Brønnøy Kommunestyre 20042007 [13]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)6
  Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)3
  Conservative Party (Høyre)3
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
  Coastal Party (Kystpartiet)1
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)5
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)3
  Liberal Party (Venstre)4
  Cross-party list (Tverrpolitisk liste)1
Total number of members:27
Brønnøy Kommunestyre 20002003 [13]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)9
  Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)1
  Conservative Party (Høyre)4
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
  Coastal Party (Kystpartiet)1
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)5
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)6
  Liberal Party (Venstre)2
  Cross-party list (Tverrpolitisk liste)3
Total number of members:33
Brønnøy Kommunestyre 19961999 [15]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)14
  Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)1
  Conservative Party (Høyre)4
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)10
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)3
Total number of members:33
Brønnøy Kommunestyre 19921995 [16]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)14
  Conservative Party (Høyre)6
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)8
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)4
Total number of members:33
Brønnøy Kommunestyre 19881991 [17]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)18
  Progress Party (Fremskrittspartiet)1
  Conservative Party (Høyre)6
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)3
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)3
  Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:33
Brønnøy Kommunestyre 19841987 [18]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)15
  Conservative Party (Høyre)8
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
  Red Electoral Alliance (Rød Valgallianse)1
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)2
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)4
  Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:33
Brønnøy Kommunestyre 19801983 [19]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)13
  Conservative Party (Høyre)10
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)3
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)3
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)3
  Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:33
Brønnøy Kommunestyre 19761979 [20]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)14
  Conservative Party (Høyre)10
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)4
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)12
  Socialist Left Party (Sosialistisk Venstreparti)4
  Liberal Party (Venstre)1
Total number of members:45
Brønnøy Kommunestyre 19721975 [21]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)19
  Conservative Party (Høyre)5
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)3
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)11
  Socialist People's Party (Sosialistisk Folkeparti)5
  Liberal Party (Venstre)2
Total number of members:45
Brønnøy Kommunestyre 19681971 [22]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)20
  Conservative Party (Høyre)5
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)3
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)7
  Socialist People's Party (Sosialistisk Folkeparti)5
  Liberal Party (Venstre)3
  Local List(s) (Lokale lister)2
Total number of members:45
Brønnøy Kommunestyre 19641967 [23]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)21
  Conservative Party (Høyre)5
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)3
  Centre Party (Senterpartiet)6
  Socialist People's Party (Sosialistisk Folkeparti)4
  Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)6
Total number of members:45
Brønnøy Herredsstyre 19601963 [24]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)5
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)1
  List of workers, fishermen, and small farmholders
(Arbeidere, fiskere, småbrukere liste)
3
  Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)2
  Local List(s) (Lokale lister)6
Total number of members:17
Brønnøy Herredsstyre 19561959 [25]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)7
  Christian Democratic Party (Kristelig Folkeparti)2
  Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)3
  Local List(s) (Lokale lister)5
Total number of members:17
Brønnøy Herredsstyre 19521955 [26]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)11
  Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)5
Total number of members:16
Brønnøy Herredsstyre 19481951 [27]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)7
  Joint List(s) of Non-Socialist Parties (Borgerlige Felleslister)5
  Local List(s) (Lokale lister)4
Total number of members:16
Brønnøy Herredsstyre 19451947 [28]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)8
  List of workers, fishermen, and small farmholders
(Arbeidere, fiskere, småbrukere liste)
4
  Local List(s) (Lokale lister)4
Total number of members:16
Brønnøy Herredsstyre 19381941* [29]   
Party Name (in Norwegian)Number of
representatives
  Labour Party (Arbeiderpartiet)5
  Local List(s) (Lokale lister)11
Total number of members:16

Notable people

Kristine Andersen Vesterfjell Kristine Andersen Vesterfjell.jpg
Kristine Andersen Vesterfjell
Halle Jorn Hanssen, 2007 HalleJH.JPG
Halle Jørn Hanssen, 2007

See also

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