Cape Hodgson

Last updated

Cape Hodgson ( 78°7′S166°5′E / 78.117°S 166.083°E / -78.117; 166.083 Coordinates: 78°7′S166°5′E / 78.117°S 166.083°E / -78.117; 166.083 ) is the northernmost cape of Black Island, in the Ross Archipelago, Antarctica. It was named by the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (1958–59) for Thomas V. Hodgson, a biologist with the British National Antarctic Expedition (1901–04), who with Reginald Koettlitz, Hartley T. Ferrar and Louis Bernacchi was the first to visit the island. [1]

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Black Island (Ross Archipelago) island

Black Island, in the Ross Archipelago, is immediately west of White Island. It was first named by the Discovery Expedition (1901–04) because of its lack of snow. The island's northernmost point is named Cape Hodgson, commemorating Thomas Vere Hodgson .

Ross Archipelago group of islands in Antarctica

Ross Archipelago is a name for that group of islands which, together with the ice shelf between them, forms the eastern and southern boundaries of McMurdo Sound in Antarctica. The most northerly is Beaufort Island, then comes Ross Island, the Dellbridge Islands, and Black Island and White Island. Frank Debenham's classic report, The Physiography of the Ross Archipelago, 1923, described "Brown Island" as a part of the group.

Related Research Articles

Fletcher Island

Fletcher Island is a rocky island, 0.5 km (0.25 nmi) in diameter, which is the largest of the Fletcher Islands. Fletcher Island is located at 66°53′S143°05′E. Fletcher Island lies in the eastern part of Commonwealth Bay, 11 km (6 nmi) west-southwest (WSW) of Cape Gray. Fletcher Island was discovered by the Australian Antarctic Expedition (AAE) (1911–1914) under Douglas Mawson, who named it for Frank D. Fletcher, First Officer on the expedition ship Aurora.

Cape Evans headland

Cape Evans is a rocky cape on the west side of Ross Island, Antarctica, forming the north side of the entrance to Erebus Bay.

Barne Glacier glacier in Antarctica

Barne Glacier is a steep glacier in Antarctica which descends from the western slopes of Mount Erebus and terminates on the west side of Ross Island, between Cape Barne and Cape Evans where it forms a steep ice cliff. It was discovered by the Discovery Expedition, 1901–04, under Robert Falcon Scott, and named by the British Antarctic Expedition, 1907–09, under Ernest Shackleton, after nearby Cape Barne, which itself is named after Michael Barne of Sotterley, Suffolk who was the second lieutenant during the Discovery Expedition.

Kirkby Glacier is a glacier, 20 miles (30 km) in length. This glacier drains the central Anare Mountains of Antarctica and flows northwest to the sea 3 miles (5 km) from Cape North, and just north of Arthurson Bluff, northern Victoria Land.

Arthurson Bluff is a mostly ice-covered bluff overlooking the confluence of Ludvig Glacier and Kirkby Glacier from the west, near the north coast of Victoria Land, Antarctica. A helicopter landing was made here by an Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions (ANARE) party led by Phillip Law in 1962. The bluff was named by ANARE for Captain J. Arthurson, helicopter pilot with the expedition. Arthurson Bluff lies on the Pennell Coast, a portion of Antarctica lying between Cape Williams and Cape Adare.

Cape Beck is a rounded, bare rock cape that forms the south end of Black Island in the Ross Archipelago. Named by New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (NZGSAE), 1958–59, for Mr. A.C. Beck, the leader of the sub-party of the expedition which explored the island. Beck examined the southeast coastline and visited this cape.

Freyberg Mountains

The Freyberg Mountains are a group of mountains in Victoria Land, Antarctica, bounded by Rennick Glacier, Bowers Mountains, Black Glacier, and Evans Neve. Named for New Zealand's most famous General, Lord Bernard Freyberg, by the Northern Party of New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (NZGSAE), 1963-64. This mountain group includes the Alamein Range. These topographical features all lie situated on the Pennell Coast, a portion of Antarctica lying between Cape Williams and Cape Adare.

Grindley Plateau is a high icecapped plateau in the central Queen Alexandra Range of Antarctica, bordered by the peaks of Mount Mackellar, Mount Bell and Mount Kirkpatrick. It was named by the Northern Party of the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (1961–62) for George Grindley, senior geologist of the party.

Drabek Peak mountain peak in the Anare Mountains, Victoria Land, Antarctica

Drabek Peak is a peak, 2,090 metres (6,860 ft) high, 6 nautical miles (11 km) north of Anare Pass and 9 nautical miles (17 km) west of Redmond Bluff in the Anare Mountains, Victoria Land, Antarctica. The topographical feature was first mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy aerial photographs, 1960–63, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Charles M. Drabek, a United States Antarctic Research Program biologist at McMurdo Station, Hut Point Peninsula, Ross Island, 1964–65 and 1967–68. The peak lies situated on the Pennell Coast, a portion of Antarctica lying between Cape Williams and Cape Adare.

Erebus Bay Antarctica

Erebus Bay is a bay about 24 kilometres (13 nmi) wide between Cape Evans and Hut Point Peninsula, on the west side of Ross Island. The bay was explored by the British National Antarctic Expedition, 1901–04, under Robert Falcon Scott. It was named by Scott's second expedition, the British Antarctic Expedition, 1910–13, which built its headquarters on Cape Evans; the feature is surmounted by Mount Erebus.

Garwood Valley

Garwood Valley is a valley opening on the coast of Victoria Land, Antarctica, just south of Cape Chocolate. It is largely ice-free, but is occupied near its head by the Garwood Glacier. It was named by Thomas Griffith Taylor of the British Antarctic Expedition, 1910–13, in association with Garwood Glacier.

Gerry Glacier

Gerry Glacier is a glacier on Edward VII Peninsula, Antarctica, flowing north between Reeves Peninsula and the Howard Heights to the head of Sulzberger Bay. Features in this area were photographed from the air and mapped by the Byrd Antarctic Expeditions, 1928–30 and 1933–35. This glacier was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1959–65, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for U.S. Senator Peter G. Gerry of Rhode Island, a long-time friend of the Byrd family and a contributor to the 1933–35 expedition.

Mount Melania is a prominent rounded hill, 330 metres (1,080 ft) high, at the north end of Black Island, in the Ross Archipelago, Antarctica. It was first climbed by Hartley T. Ferrar and Louis Bernacchi of the British National Antarctic Expedition, 1901–04. The name, from a Greek word connoting the color black, an appropriate name for a feature on Black Island, was given by the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition in 1958–59.

Mount Heine is a hill, 760 metres (2,490 ft) high, in the northern part of White Island, in the Ross Archipelago, Antarctica. It was named by the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (1958–59) for A.J. Heine, the leader of their party who visited White Island. Heine, who climbed this hill, spent four summers and one winter in Antarctica, mostly in the McMurdo Sound area.

Scallop Hill is a volcanic dome rising to 225 m directly behind Cape Spirit on Black Island, in Antarctica's Ross Archipelago. Named by the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (NZGSAE) (1958–59) after a fossiliferous conglomerate on top of the hill which contains a Chlamid lamellibranch commonly called scallops.

Cape Spirit is the easternmost point of Black Island, in the Ross Archipelago. Visited by the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (NZGSAE) (1958–59) and so named by them because of the almost constant and spirited winds blowing through the strait between Black and White Islands.

Thala Island is the southern of two small, rocky islands lying just off the northwest edge of Davis Ice Piedmont, along the north coast of Victoria Land. Named by ANARE after MV Thala Dan, one of two expedition ships used by ANARE in 1962 to explore this area.

Rowe Nunataks is a cluster of nunataks 3 nautical miles (6 km) northwest of Cape Beck in the southwest part of Black Island, Ross Archipelago. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) (1999) after C.A. Rowe, Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, who investigated volcanic activity and seismicity at nearby Mount Erebus, 1984–85 and 1985-86.

Clarke Glacier (Victoria Land)

Clarke Glacier is a 5 mile long glacier, which drains east to the coast of Victoria Land, immediately north of Lewandowski Point. The seaward extremity of this glacier merges with the flow of Davis Glacier and other glaciers from the south and contributes to the floating tongue of ice between Cape Reynolds and Lamplugh Island.

References

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Hodgson, Cape" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

United States Geological Survey scientific agency of the United States government

The United States Geological Survey is a scientific agency of the United States government. The scientists of the USGS study the landscape of the United States, its natural resources, and the natural hazards that threaten it. The organization has four major science disciplines, concerning biology, geography, geology, and hydrology. The USGS is a fact-finding research organization with no regulatory responsibility.

Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.