Convention of Artlenburg

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The Convention of Artlenburg or Elbkonvention was the surrender of the Electorate of Hanover to Napoleon's army, signed at Artlenburg on 5 July 1803 by Oberbefehlshaber Johann Ludwig von Wallmoden-Gimborn. It disbanded the Electorate of Hanover and instigated its occupation by French troops.

Artlenburg Place in Lower Saxony, Germany

Artlenburg is a municipality in the district of Lüneburg, in Lower Saxony, Germany. Artlenburg has an area of 11.85 km² and a population of 1,619.

Context

After Napoleonic troops under lieutenant-general Édouard Adolphe Casimir Joseph Mortier occupied the electorate's capital at Hanover on 4 June 1803, the remaining Hanoverian troops withdrew to the north bank of the Elbe, into the Duchy of Saxe-Lauenburg, but were soon forced to surrender.

Elbe major river in Central Europe

The Elbe is one of the major rivers of Central Europe. It rises in the Krkonoše Mountains of the northern Czech Republic before traversing much of Bohemia, then Germany and flowing into the North Sea at Cuxhaven, 110 km (68 mi) northwest of Hamburg. Its total length is 1,094 kilometres (680 mi).

Sources

<i><i lang="de" title="German language text">Meyers Konversations-Lexikon</i></i> encyclopedic work in German language

Meyers Konversations-Lexikon or Meyers Lexikon was a major encyclopedia in the German language that existed in various editions, and by several titles, from 1839 to 1984, when it merged with the Brockhaus Enzyklopädie.

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