Copper oxalate

Last updated
Copper oxalate
Copper (II) Oxalate Structural Formula V1.svg
Names
Other names
Copper (II) oxalate, cupric oxalate, copper(2+) ethanedioate
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.011.283 OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg
EC Number
  • 212-411-4
PubChem CID
UNII
UN number 3077
  • Key: QYCVHILLJSYYBD-UHFFFAOYSA-N
  • InChI=1S/C2H2O4.Cu/c3-1(4)2(5)6;/h(H,3,4)(H,5,6);/q;+2
  • C(=O)(C(=O)O)O.[Cu+2]
Properties
CuC
2
O
4
Molar mass 153.58
Appearanceblue-white solid (as a hemihydrate)
Melting point 310 °C (590 °F; 583 K)
insoluble
4.43×1010 [1]
Hazards
GHS pictograms GHS-pictogram-exclam.svg [2]
GHS Signal word Warning
H302+312, H302, H312
P264, P270, P280, P301+312, P302+352, P312, P322, P330, P363, P501
Related compounds
Related compounds
Calcium oxalate
Sodium oxalate
Magnesium oxalate
Strontium oxalate
Barium oxalate
Iron(II) oxalate
Iron(III) oxalate
Lithium oxalate
Praseodymium oxalate
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Copper oxalate is an inorganic compound, a salt of copper metal and oxalic acid with the chemical formula CuC
2
O
4
. [3] The compound is practically insoluble in water, alcohol, ether, and acetic acid but soluble in ammonium hydroxide. [4] Copper oxalate forms a hydrate, which forms acid-blue crystals.

Contents

Synthesis

Copper oxalate can be produced by precipitation from a mixture of a copper (II) salt and a sodium oxalate solution or by reacting copper sulfate with oxalic acid. [5]

Properties

As a hemihydrate, copper oxalate is a blue-white solid that is practically insoluble in water. At 200 °C, it loses its water due to crystallization.

The compound also forms complex salts with alkali metal oxalates and ammonium oxalate:

Uses

Copper oxalate is used as a catalyst for organic reactions, as a stabilizer for acetylated polyformaldehyde [6] and in seed treatment (to repel birds and rodents).[ citation needed ]

See also

Related Research Articles

Oxalic acid Simplest dicarboxylic acid

Oxalic acid is an organic acid with the IUPAC name ethanedioic acid and formula HO
2
C−CO
2
H
. It is the simplest dicarboxylic acid. It is a white crystalline solid that forms a colorless solution in water. Its name comes from the fact that early investigators isolated oxalic acid from flowering plants of the genus Oxalis, commonly known as wood-sorrels. It occurs naturally in many foods, but excessive ingestion of oxalic acid or prolonged skin contact can be dangerous.

Oxalate Any derivative of oxalic acid; chemical compound containing oxalate moiety

Oxalate (IUPAC: ethanedioate) is a compound found in some foods, which when consumed exits the body through the urine. Excess consumption has been linked to gout and kidney stones. Many metal ions form insoluble precipitates with oxalate, a prominent example being calcium oxalate, the primary constituent of the most common kind of kidney stones. Several plant foods such as the root and/or leaves of spinach, rhubarb, and buckwheat are high in oxalic acid and can contribute to the formation of kidney stones in some individuals. Chemically, oxalate is a dianion with the formula C
2
O2−
4
, also written (COO)2−
2
. Either name is often used for derivatives, such as salts of oxalic acid, for example sodium oxalate Na2C2O4, or dimethyl oxalate ((CH3)2C2O4). Oxalate also forms coordination compounds where it is sometimes abbreviated as ox.

Classical qualitative inorganic analysis is a method of analytical chemistry which seeks to find the elemental composition of inorganic compounds. It is mainly focused on detecting ions in an aqueous solution, therefore materials in other forms may need to be brought to this state before using standard methods. The solution is then treated with various reagents to test for reactions characteristic of certain ions, which may cause color change, precipitation and other visible changes.

Americium dioxide (AmO2) is a black compound of americium. In the solid state AmO2 adopts the fluorite, CaF2 structure. It is used as a source of alpha particles.

Barium oxalate Chemical compound

Barium oxalate (BaC2O4), a barium salt of oxalic acid, is a white odorless powder that is sometimes used as a green pyrotechnic colorant generally in specialized pyrotechnic compositions containing magnesium metal powder. Flame color is rich and vivid without additional chlorine donors. Such compositions burn rate is satisfied without commonly used oxidizers as nitrates, chlorates and perchlorates.

Dimethyl oxalate Chemical compound

Dimethyl oxalate is the organic compound with the formula (CO2CH3)2. It is the dimethyl ester of oxalic acid. Dimethyl oxalate is a colorless or white solid that is soluble in water.

Ammonium oxalate Chemical compound

Ammonium oxalate, C2H8N2O4 – more commonly written as (NH4)2C2O4 – is an oxalate salt with ammonium (sometimes as a monohydrate). It is a colorless (white) salt under standard conditions and is odorless and non-volatile. It is the ammonium salt of oxalic acid, and occurs in many plants and vegetables.

Beryllium oxalate Chemical compound

Beryllium oxalate is an inorganic compound, a salt of beryllium metal and oxalic acid with the chemical formula C
2
BeO
4
. It forms colorless crystals, dissolves in water, and also forms crystalline hydrates. The compound is used to prepare ultra-pure beryllium oxide by thermal decomposition.

Lithium oxalate Chemical compound

Lithium oxalate is an inorganic compound, a salt of lithium metal and oxalic acid with the chemical formula C
2
Li
2
O
4
. Lithium oxalate is highly insoluble in water and converts to the oxide when heated.

Praseodymium oxalate is an inorganic compound, a salt of praseodymium metal and oxalic acid with the chemical formula C6O12Pr2. The compound forms light green crystals, insoluble in water, also forms crystalline hydrates.

Yttrium oxalate Chemical compound

Yttrium oxalate is an inorganic compound, a salt of yttrium and oxalic acid with the chemical formula Y2(C2O4)3. The compound does not dissolve in water and forms crystalline hydrates—colorless crystals.

Manganese oxalate is a chemical compound, a salt of manganese and oxalic acid with the chemical formula MnC
2
O
4
. The compound creates light pink crystals, does not dissolve in water, and forms crystalline hydrates.

Tin oxalate Chemical compound

Tin(II) oxalate is an inorganic compound, a salt of tin and oxalic acid with the chemical formula SnC
2
O
4
. The compound looks like colorless crystals, does not dissolve in water, and forms crystalline hydrates.

Neptunium (IV) oxalate is an inorganic compound, a salt of neptunium and oxalic acid with the chemical formula Np(C2O4)2. The compound is slightly soluble in water, forms crystalline hydrates—green crystals.

Samarium(III) oxalate is an inorganic compound, a salt of samarium and oxalic acid with the formula Sm2(C2O4)3. The compound does not dissolve in water, forms a crystalline hydrate with yellow crystals.

Actinium (III) nitrate is an inorganic compound, actinium salt of nitric acid with the chemical formula Ac(NO3)3. The compound looks like white substance, readily soluble in water.

Dysprosium(III) nitrate Chemical compound

Dysprosium(III) nitrate is an inorganic compound, a salt of dysprosium and nitric acid with the chemical formula Dy(NO3)3. The compound forms yellowish crystals, dissolves in water, forms a crystalline hydrate.

Holmium(III) nitrate Chemical compound

Holmium (III) nitrate is an inorganic compound, a salt of holmium and nitric acid with the chemical formula Ho(NO3)3. The compound forms yellowish crystals, dissolves in water, also forms crystalline hydrates.

Lutetium(III) nitrate is an inorganic compound, a salt of lutetium and nitric acid with the chemical formula Lu(NO3)3. The compound forms colorless crystals, dissolves in water, and also forms crystalline hydrates. The compound is poisonous.

Erbium(III) nitrate is an inorganic compound, a salt of erbium and nitric acid with the chemical formula Er(NO3)3. The compound forms pink crystals, readily soluble in water, also forms crystalline hydrates.

References

  1. John Rumble (June 18, 2018). CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics (99 ed.). CRC Press. pp. 5–188. ISBN   1138561630.
  2. "Copper oxalate - Substance Information - ECHA". European Chemical Agency . Retrieved 17 June 2021.
  3. Royappa, A. Timothy; Royappa, Andrew D.; Moral, Raphael F.; Rheingold, Arnold L.; Papoular, Robert J.; Blum, Deke M.; Duong, Tien Q.; Stepherson, Jacob R.; Vu, Oliver D.; Chen, Banghao; Suchomel, Matthew R.; Golen, James A.; André, Gilles; Kourkoumelis, Nikolaos; Mercer, Andrew D.; Pekarek, Allegra M.; Kelly, Dylan C. (November 2016). "Copper(I) oxalate complexes: Synthesis, structures and surprises". Polyhedron. 119: 563–574. doi:10.1016/j.poly.2016.09.043.
  4. "Hazardous Substances Data Bank (HSDB) : 265". National Library of Medicine . Retrieved 17 June 2021.
  5. Gooch, Frank Austin (1909). The precipitation of copper oxalate in analysis. p. 448. OCLC   890741677.
  6. Richardson, H. Wayne (1997). Handbook of Copper Compounds and Applications. CRC Press. p. 84. ISBN   978-0-8247-8998-5.