Eagle in a Cage

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Eagle in a Cage
Eagle in a Cage FilmPoster.jpeg
Directed by Fielder Cook
Produced by Millard Lampell
Albert Schwartz
Written byMillard Lampell
StarringSee below
Music by Marc Wilkinson
Cinematography Frano Vodopivec
Edited by Max Benedict
Production
company
Distributed by National General Pictures
Release date
  • 1972 (1972)
Running time
103 minutes (UK)
98 minutes (USA)
CountryUnited States
United Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

Eagle in a Cage is an Anglo-American historical drama film, produced in 1972.

Contents

Plot summary

After his defeat at the Battle of Waterloo and surrender to the British Empire, Napoleon Bonaparte is delivered into exile and imprisonment on St. Helena, setting the scene for a psychological character study of the fallen Emperor and those upon the island with him as he rakes over the ashes of his career. After a failed escape attempt, the British Government offers him a chance for a return to limited power in France once again as a buffer against instability there, however on the point of departure he is afflicted by the symptoms of stomach cancer and the offer is in consequence withdrawn, leaving him entrapped on the island and exiting history's stage.

Cast

See also

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