From Headquarters

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From Headquarters
From Headquarters.jpg
Directed by William Dieterle
Produced by Samuel Bischoff (uncredited)
Written by Robert N. Lee
Peter Milne
Story byRobert N. Lee
Starring George Brent
Margaret Lindsay
Eugene Pallette
Cinematography William Rees (as William Reese)
Edited by William Clemens
Production
company
Distributed byWarner Bros.
Release date
  • November 16, 1933 (1933-11-16)
Running time
62-65 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Budget$105,000 [1]
Box office$338,000 [1]

From Headquarters is a 1933 American pre-Code murder mystery film starring George Brent, Margaret Lindsay and Eugene Pallette, and directed by William Dieterle.

Contents

Cast

Reception

The New York Times review was lukewarm, calling it "a tidbit for the hardier addicts of the mystery melodramas. Less specialized students of the cinema are likely to find in it only the mildest sort of entertainment." [2] However, the reviewer did praise the cast as "uniformly pleasant". [2]

According to Warner Bros records, the film earned $228,000 domestically and $110,000 foreign. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 3 Warner Bros financial information in The William Shaefer Ledger. See Appendix 1, Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television, (1995) 15:sup1, 1-31 p 15 DOI: 10.1080/01439689508604551
  2. 1 2 A.P.S. (November 17, 1933). "From Headquarters (1933): Hunting Criminals". The New York Times.