Jeffrey Young

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Jeffrey E. Young (born 9 March 1950) is an American psychologist best known for having developed schema therapy. He is the founder of the Schema Therapy Institute.

After earning an undergraduate degree at Yale University, he obtained a higher education degree at the University of Pennsylvania, where he then pursued postdoctoral studies with Aaron Beck.

He has written numerous books on cognitive behavioral therapy and schema therapy. His two most famous books are Schema Therapy (for professionals), and Reinventing Your Life (for the general public).

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