John Fordham

Last updated
John Fordham
Bishop of Ely
Appointed 3 April 1388
Term ended 19 November 1425
Predecessor Thomas Arundel
Successor Philip Morgan
Orders
Consecration 5 January 1382
Personal details
Died(1425-11-19)19 November 1425
Denomination Catholic
Previous post Bishop of Durham

John Fordham (died 1425) was Bishop of Durham and Bishop of Ely.

Bishop of Durham Diocesan bishop in the Church of England

The Bishop of Durham is the Anglican bishop responsible for the Diocese of Durham in the Province of York. The diocese is one of the oldest in England and its bishop is a member of the House of Lords. Paul Butler has been the Bishop of Durham since his election was confirmed at York Minster on 20 January 2014. The previous bishop was Justin Welby, Archbishop of Canterbury. The bishop is one of two who escort the sovereign at the coronation.

Bishop of Ely Diocesan bishop in the Church of England

The Bishop of Ely is the ordinary of the Church of England Diocese of Ely in the Province of Canterbury. The diocese roughly covers the county of Cambridgeshire, together with a section of north-west Norfolk and has its episcopal see in the City of Ely, Cambridgeshire, where the seat is located at the Cathedral Church of the Holy Trinity. The current bishop is Stephen Conway, who signs +Stephen Elien:. The diocesan bishops resided at the Bishop's Palace, Ely until 1941; they now reside in Bishop's House, the former cathedral deanery. Conway became Bishop of Ely in 2010, translated from the Diocese of Salisbury where he was Bishop suffragan of Ramsbury.

Fordham was keeper of the privy seal of Prince Richard from 1376 to 1377 and Dean of Wells before being named Lord Privy Seal in June 1377. He held that office until December 1381. [1]

Richard II of England 14th-century King of England and Duke of Aquitaine

Richard II, also known as Richard of Bordeaux, was King of England from 1377 until he was deposed in 1399. Richard's father, Edward the Black Prince, died in 1376, leaving Richard as heir apparent to King Edward III. Upon the death of his grandfather Edward III, the 10-year-old Richard succeeded to the throne.

Dean of Wells ecclesiastical office in the Church of England

The Dean of Wells is the head of the Chapter of Wells Cathedral in the Mendip district of Somerset, England. The dean's residence is The Dean's Lodging, 25 The Liberty, Wells.

Lord Privy Seal sinecure office of state in the UK

The Lord Privy Seal is the fifth of the Great Officers of State in the United Kingdom, ranking beneath the Lord President of the Council and above the Lord Great Chamberlain. Originally, its holder was responsible for the monarch's personal (privy) seal until the use of such a seal became obsolete. The office is currently one of the traditional sinecure offices of state. Today, the holder of the office is invariably given a seat in the Cabinet of the United Kingdom.

Fordham was nominated to Durham on 9 September 1381 and consecrated on 5 January 1382. He was translated to Ely on 3 April 1388. [2]

Fordham briefly served as Lord High Treasurer in 1386. [3]

Lord High Treasurer English government position

The post of Lord High Treasurer or Lord Treasurer was an English government position and has been a British government position since the Acts of Union of 1707. A holder of the post would be the third-highest-ranked Great Officer of State, below the Lord High Steward and the Lord High Chancellor.

Fordham died on 19 November 1425. [4] His executors, listed in 1430, were Robert Wetheryngsete, John Bernard, William Derby, Thomas Reynald & Robert Crowe. [5]

Citations

  1. Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 94
  2. Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 242
  3. Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 106
  4. Fryde, et al. Handbook of British Chronology p. 244
  5. "Plea Rolls of the Court of Common Pleas; National Archives; CP 40 / 677" . Retrieved 4 January 2014. First entry, with "Cant" in the margin.

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References

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Political offices
Preceded by
Nicholas Carew
Lord Privy Seal
1377–1381
Succeeded by
William Dighton
Preceded by
Hugh Segrave
Lord High Treasurer
1386
Succeeded by
John Gilbert
Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Thomas Hatfield
Bishop of Durham
1381–1388
Succeeded by
Walter Skirlaw
Preceded by
Thomas Arundel
Bishop of Ely
1388–1425
Succeeded by
Philip Morgan