Lawson baronets

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There have been six baronetcies created for persons with the surname of Lawson, two in the Baronetage of England and four in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom. Two creations are extant as of 2010.

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Lawson baronets, of Brough Hall (1665; First creation )

The Lawson Baronetcy, of Brough Hall in the County of York, was created in the Baronetage of England on 6 July 1665 for John Lawson, of Brough Hall. The title became extinct on the death of the sixth Baronet in January 1834. His estate at Lartington Hall passed to his nephew Henry Thomas Maire (Silvertop) Witham, son of his sister Catherine. The Brough Hall estate passed to his great-nephew, in whose favour the baronetcy was revived in 1841 (see below).

Lartington Hall

Lartington Hall is a 17th-century country house, at Lartington, Teesdale, County Durham, England. It is a Grade II* listed building.

Lawson baronets, of Isell (1688)

The Lawson Baronetcy, of Isell in the County of Cumberland, was created in the Baronetage of England on 31 March 1688 for Wilfrid Lawson, Member of Parliament for Cumberland and Cockermouth. The second, third, sixth and eighth Baronet were also Members of Parliament. The title became extinct on the death of the tenth Baronet in 1806. [1] See also the 1831 creation below.

Sir Wilfrid Lawson, 1st Baronet, of Isel (c. 1610–1688) was an English landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1660 to 1679.

Cumberland is a former United Kingdom Parliamentary constituency. It was a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of England then of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800 and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1832. It was represented by two Knights of the Shire. It was divided between the constituencies of Cumberland East and Cumberland West in 1832.

Cockermouth was the name of a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of England in 1295, and again from 1641, then of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800 and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1918. It was a parliamentary borough represented by two Members of Parliament until 1868, and by one member from 1868 to 1885. The name was then transferred to a county constituency electing one MP from 1885 until 1918.

Sir Wilfrid Lawson, 2nd Baronet of Isel was an English politician.

Sir Wilfrid Lawson, 3rd Baronet, of Isell British politician

Sir Wilfrid Lawson, 3rd Baronet of Isell FRS was a British politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1718 to 1737.

Sir Gilfrid Lawson, 6th Baronet (1675–1749), of Brayton Hall, Cumbria, was an English lawyer and politician who sat in the English House of Commons between 1701 and 1705 and in the British House of Commons from 1708 to 1734.

Lawson baronets, of Brayton (1831)

The Lawson Baronetcy, of Brayton in the County of Cumberland, was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom on 30 September 1831 for Wilfrid Lawson. Born Wilfrid Wybergh, he was the son of Thomas Wyberg by the sister of the tenth Baronet of the 1688 creation (see above). He assumed by Royal licence the surname of Lawson in lieu of his patronymic. The second and third Baronets were both Members of Parliament. The title became extinct on the death of the fourth Baronet in 1959.

Sir Wilfrid Lawson, 1st Baronet, of Brayton businessman

Sir Wilfrid Lawson, 1st Baronet, of Brayton, was an English landowner, businessman and investor in the new industrial age. He was of the Lawson baronets.

Sir Wilfrid Lawson, 2nd Baronet, of Brayton British politician

Sir Wilfrid Lawson, 2nd Baronet was an English temperance campaigner and radical, anti-imperialist Liberal Party politician who sat in the House of Commons variously between 1859 and 1906. He was recognised as the leading humourist in the House of Commons.

Sir Wilfrid Lawson, 3rd Baronet, of Brayton British politician

Sir Wilfrid Lawson, 3rd Baronet, of Brayton was an English Liberal politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1910 to 1916. He was also a keen sportsman who excelled at cricket and steeplechasing.

Lawson, later Howard-Lawson baronets, of Brough Hall (1841; Second creation)

The Lawson, later Howard-Lawson Baronetcy, of Brough Hall in the County of York, was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom on 8 September 1841 for William Lawson. Born William Wright, he was the son of John Wright, of Kelvedon, by Elizabeth Lawson, daughter of the fifth Baronet of the 1665 creation (see above), whose surname he assumed in lieu of his patronymic. His mother had previously inherited the Lawson family seat of Brough Hall. The third Baronet married Ursula Mary Howard in 1899. She was the only living heir of Sir Philip John Canning Howard, of Corby Castle, Cumberland, a descendant of Sir Francis Howard, son of Lord William Howard, third son of Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk. The sixth Baronet assumed by Royal Licence in 1962 the Howard name and arms and then resumed use of the Lawson name in 1992. [2]

On the death of the fourth Baronet in 1975 Brough Hall was left to his two daughters, Valerie Worthington (née Lawson) and Jill Lawson. [2] The title passed to his younger brother William, the fifth Baronet, and the seat moved to Corby Castle, Cumbria, ancestral home of the Howard family. Corby Castle was sold in 1994 to Lord Ballyedmond. The fifth Baronet was a Deputy Lieutenant of Cumbria between 1963 and 1983.

On 7 December 2010, it was reported [3] that Philip Howard, the son of Sir John Philip Howard-Lawson, 6th Baronet, was suing the latter for unlawfully selling the ancestral home of Corby Castle. Howard claimed that his father had defaulted on the terms of the 1934 will of his great-grandfather, Sir Philip John Canning Howard, that his heirs must change their name to Howard and apply to adopt the family coat of arms within a year in order to inherit, and that consequently he, Philip Howard, was the heir by default and the rightful owner of the proceeds of the castle sale. It was reported in February and March 2012 that the suit had been rejected by the original court and again at appeal, and that Philip Howard was intending to pursue it in the Supreme Court. [4] [5]

The heir is Sir John's son, Philip William Howard [3]

Lawson baronets, of Westwood Grange (1900)

The Lawson Baronetcy, of Westwood Grange in Headingley-cum-Burley in the West Riding of the County of York, was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom on 12 July 1900 for Arthur Lawson, Chairman of Fairbairn Lawson Combe Barbour Ltd, and a Director of the Great Eastern Railway and the Yorkshire Post . The second Baronet was also Chairman of Fairbairn, Lawson, Combe-Barbour Ltd. The third Baronet was a Colonel in the Royal Hussars.

The heir apparent to the baronetcy is Jack William Tremayne Lawson (born 1989), eldest son of the 4th Baronet.

Lawson baronets, of Knavesmire Lodge (1905)

The Lawson Baronetcy, of Knavesmire Lodge in the City of York, was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom on 26 December 1905 for the politician John Lawson. The title became extinct on the death of the second Baronet in 1973.

Notes

  1. Cokayne, George E. Complete baronetage. W. Pollard & co. Retrieved 4 October 2018.
  2. 1 2 Debrett'e Peerage and Baronetage.
  3. 1 2 Tozer, James (7 December 2010). "Daily Mail". London.
  4. Mundy, Katie. Case summary: Howard v Howard – Lawson [2012] EWCA Civ 6 12 March 2012. www.crippslink.com. Accessed 8 June 2013.
  5. Belcher, Chris. Chris Belcher considers the Howard case. 15 February 2012. www.privateclientadviser.co.uk. Accessed 8 June 2013.

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