Mot

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Mot or MOT may refer to:

Contents

Media

Mot (TV series)

Mot is a French children's animated television series about a purple monster. Based on the children's comics by Alfonso Azpiri, Mot is from the Monstrous Organicus Telluricus family. The series follows Mot's adventures with his human friend Leo.

Religion

Science and technology

Magneto-optical trap device in physics to trap atoms in vacuum

A magneto-optical trap (MOT) is an apparatus that uses laser cooling with magneto-optical trapping in order to produce samples of cold, trapped, neutral atoms at temperatures as low as several microkelvins, two or three times the recoil limit . By combining the small momentum of a single photon with a velocity and spatially dependent absorption cross section and a large number of absorption-spontaneous emission cycles, atoms with initial velocities of hundreds of metres per second can be slowed to tens of centimetres per second.

In chemistry, Molecular orbital (MO) theory is a method for describing the electronic structure of molecules using quantum mechanics. Electrons are not assigned to individual bonds between atoms, but are treated as moving under the influence of the nuclei in the whole molecule. The spatial and energetic properties of electrons are described by quantum mechanics as molecular orbitals surround two or more atoms in a molecule and contain valence electrons between atoms. Molecular orbital theory, which was proposed in the early twentieth century, revolutionized the study of bonding by approximating the states of bonded electrons—the molecular orbitals—as linear combinations of atomic orbitals (LCAO). These approximations are now made by applying the density functional theory (DFT) or Hartree–Fock (HF) models to the Schrödinger equation.

MOT test Mandatory periodical technical checkup for motor vehicles in the United Kingdom

The MOT test is an annual test of vehicle safety, roadworthiness aspects and exhaust emissions required in the United Kingdom for most vehicles over three years old used on any way defined as a road in the Road Traffic Act 1988; it does not apply only to highways but includes other places available for public use, which are not highways. In Northern Ireland the equivalent requirement applies after four years. The requirement does not apply to vehicles used only on various small islands with no convenient connection "to a road in any part of Great Britain"; no similar exemption is listed at the beginning of 2014 for Northern Ireland, which has a single inhabited island, Rathlin.

Organizations

Minot International Airport

Minot International Airport is in Ward County, North Dakota, two miles north of the city of Minot, which owns it. The National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015 categorized it as a primary commercial service airport.

MOT International, formerly MOT Gallery, was a contemporary art gallery in east London run by Chris Hammond. It opened in 2002 and closed in 2016.

MOT is a Norwegian organization formed to combat youth violence and drug use. In Norwegian the word mot is a homonym, meaning both courage and against.

See also

Related Research Articles

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CT or ct may refer to:

Microwave oven kitchen appliance

A microwave oven is an electric oven that heats and cooks food by exposing it to electromagnetic radiation in the microwave frequency range. This induces polar molecules in the food to rotate and produce thermal energy in a process known as dielectric heating. Microwave ovens heat foods quickly and efficiently because excitation is fairly uniform in the outer 25–38 mm (1–1.5 inches) of a homogeneous, high water content food item.

UT or ut may refer to:

Apollo is a Greek and Roman god of music, healing, light, prophecy and enlightenment.

MT, Mt, mT, mt, or Mt. may refer to:

Michael Shanks Canadian actor

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A whisper is a sound produced by whispering.

Carson Beckett fictional human

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James Swallow is a British author. A BAFTA nominee and a New York Times and Sunday Times best-seller, he is the author of several original books and tie-in novels, as well as short fiction, numerous audio dramas and video games.

The word "portal" in science fiction and fantasy generally refers to a technological or magical doorway that connects two distant locations separated by spacetime. It usually consists of two or more gateways, with an object entering one gateway leaving via the other instantaneously.

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Touchstone may refer to:

Supernovae in works of fiction often serve as plot devices.

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