Mount Melania

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Mount Melania ( 78°7′S166°8′E / 78.117°S 166.133°E / -78.117; 166.133 Coordinates: 78°7′S166°8′E / 78.117°S 166.133°E / -78.117; 166.133 ) is a prominent rounded hill, 330 metres (1,080 ft) high, at the north end of Black Island, in the Ross Archipelago, Antarctica. It was first climbed by Hartley T. Ferrar and Louis Bernacchi of the British National Antarctic Expedition, 1901–04. The name, from a Greek word connoting the color black, an appropriate name for a feature on Black Island, was given by the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition in 1958–59. [1]

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New Zealand Antarctic Place-Names Committee (NZ-APC) is an adjudicating committee established to authorize the naming of features in the Ross Dependency on the Antarctic continent. It is composed of the members of the New Zealand Geographic Board plus selected specialists on Antarctica. This committee works in collaboration with similar place-naming authorities in Australia, Great Britain and the United States to reach concurrence on each decision. The NZ-APC committee was established in 1956.

References

  1. "Mount Melania". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey . Retrieved 2013-09-16.