Paul Douglas

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Notes

  1. Douglas, Paul. "We Need Land Reform". Incentive Taxation (September, 1987). Retrieved November 9, 2016.
  2. Biles (2002)
  3. https://www.bowdoin.edu/economics/curriculum-requirements/douglas-biography.shtml
  4. Phillips, Ronnie J. (June 1992), The 'Chicago Plan' and New Deal Banking Reform, Working Paper No. 76 (PDF), The Levy Economics Institute
  5. "School Trustee Walker Denies Douglas Charge". Chicago Daily Tribune. May 15, 1942. p. 15.
  6. Manson, Shane (April 2, 2021). "Oldest Recruit in the History of Parris Island". The United States Marine Corps. Retrieved November 13, 2021. Even though thousands of visitors have walked the halls of the Douglas Visitor Center, very few know the story of the man behind the namesake, who became the oldest recruit in the history of Parris Island.
  7. Douglas(1972), p.109
  8. Milton Mayer, The Nature of the Beast. (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1975, ISBN   0870231766), p. 312
  9. "On His Merits". Decatur Herald. Decatur, Illinois. November 27, 1942. p. 6.
  10. "Now He's a Captain". Chicago Daily Tribune. November 25, 1942. p. 2.
  11. Sledge, E.B. (2010). With the Old Breed. New York: Presidio Press. p. 89. ISBN   978-0-8914-1906-8.
  12. Douglas(1972), p.119
  13. 1 2 Sledge(1990), p.90
  14. Douglas(1972), p.120
  15. Douglas(1972), p.121
  16. Paul H. Douglas, In the Fulness of Time, 1972, p. 127
  17. "American Economic Association".
  18. Douglas, In the Fulness of Time, 1972, pp. 127-128
  19. Merriner, James L. (March 9, 2003). "Illinois' liberal giant, Paul Douglas". Chicago Tribune . Retrieved May 17, 2015.
  20. Wil Haygood, Showdown: Thurgood Marshall and the Supreme Court Nomination That Changed America, Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, 2015, 9780385353168.
  21. cover stories on Douglas in Time issues dated January 16, 1950 and January 22, 1951
  22. View/Search Fellows of the ASA, accessed 2016-07-23.
  23. Gaffney, Mason. "Stimulus: The False and the True Mason Gaffney" . Retrieved August 13, 2015.
  24. Douglas, Paul (1972). In the fullness of time; the memoirs of Paul H. Douglas. New York: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. ISBN   0151443769.
  25. ^ "Krebiozen Analyzed". Time. 1963-09-13. Archived from the original on December 22, 2008. Retrieved 2014-07-29.

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References

  • Biles, Roger. Crusading Liberal: Paul H. Douglas of Illinois (2002), the standard scholarly biography
  • Biles, Roger. "Paul H Douglas, McCarthyism and the Senatorial Election of 1954," Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society 95#1 2002. pp 52+.
  • Douglas, Paul H. (1972). In the Fullness of Time;: The Memoirs of Paul H. Douglas. Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. ISBN   0-15-144376-9.
  • Sledge, Eugene B. (1990). With the Old Breed: At Peleliu and Okinawa. Oxford University Press. ISBN   0-19-506714-2.
  • Hartley, Robert E. Battleground 1948: Truman, Stevenson, Douglas, and the Most Surprising Election in Illinois History (Southern Illinois University Press; 2013)
Paul Douglas
Senator Paul Douglas.jpg
United States Senator
from Illinois
In office
January 3, 1949 January 3, 1967
Party political offices
Preceded by Democratic nominee for U.S. Senator from Illinois
(Class 2)

1948, 1954, 1960, 1966
Succeeded by
U.S. Senate
Preceded by U.S. senator (Class 2) from Illinois
1949–1967
Served alongside: Scott W. Lucas. Everett M. Dirksen
Succeeded by