Peter Ramsden

Last updated

Peter Ramsden
Personal information
Born9 May 1934
Huddersfield, England
Died1 September 2002(2002-09-01) (aged 68)
York, England
Playing information
Height5 ft 8 in (1.73 m)
Weight14 st 0 lb (89 kg)
Position Centre, Stand-off, Loose forward
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1951–64 Huddersfield 246542146
1964–65 York 26
Total2725420146
Source: [1]

Peter Ramsden (9 May 1934 – 1 September 2002) was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1950s and 1960s. He played at club level for Huddersfield and York, as a centre , stand-off or loose forward, i.e. number 3 or 4, 6, or 13, during the era of contested scrums.

Contents

Background

Peter Ramsden was born in Huddersfield, West Riding of Yorkshire, England, and he died aged 68 in York, North Yorkshire, England.

Playing career

Challenge Cup Final appearances

Peter Ramsden played stand-off, broke his nose after six minutes, scored two tries, and won the Lance Todd Trophy in Huddersfield's 15-10 victory over St. Helens in the 1952–53 Challenge Cup Final during the 1952–53 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 25 April 1953, in front of a crowd of 89,588, [2] and played in the 6-12 defeat by Wakefield Trinity in the 1961–62 Challenge Cup Final during the 1961–62 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 12 May 1962, in front of a crowd of 81,263. [3]

Lance Todd Trophy

Peter Ramsden is the youngest player ever to win the Lance Todd Trophy, aged 19 in the 1952–53 Challenge Cup Final during the 1952–53 season. [4]

County Cup Final appearances

Peter Ramsden played right-centre, i.e. number 3, in the 18-8 victory over Batley in the 1952–53 Yorkshire County Cup Final during the 1952–53 season at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds on Saturday 15 November 1952, and played stand-off in the 15-8 victory over York in the 1957–58 Yorkshire County Cup Final during the 1957–58 season at Headingley Rugby Stadium, Leeds on Saturday 19 October 1957. [5]

Testimonial match

Peter Ramsden's Testimonial match at Huddersfield took place in 1961. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 Gronow, David (2008). 100 Greats: Huddersfield Rugby League Football Club. Stroud: Stadia. pp. 89–90. ISBN   978-0-7524-4584-7.
  2. McCorquodale, London S.E (25 April 1953). The Rugby League Challenge Cup Competition – Final Tie – Huddersfield v St. Helens – Match Programme. Wembley Stadium Ltd. ISBN n/a
  3. Briggs, Cyril & Edwards, Barry (12 May 1962). The Rugby League Challenge Cup Competition - Final Tie - Huddersfield v Wakefield Trinity - Match Programme. Wembley Stadium Ltd. ISBN n/a
  4. "Ray French selects his top 10 Challenge Cup Final shocks. No 10:, 1953, Huddersfield 15-10 St Helens". bbc.co.uk. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  5. "Programme 'Yorkshire County Rugby League - Challenge Cup Final - 1957 - Huddersfield v. York'" (PDF). huddersfieldrlheritage.co.uk. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.