Pier (disambiguation)

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A pier is a raised walkway over water, supported by widely spread piles or pillars.

Pier Raised structure in a body of water, typically supported by well-spaced piles or pillars

A pier is a raised structure in a body of water, typically supported by well-spaced piles or pillars. Bridges, buildings, and walkways may all be supported by piers. Their open structure allows tides and currents to flow relatively unhindered, whereas the more solid foundations of a quay or the closely spaced piles of a wharf can act as a breakwater, and are consequently more liable to silting. Piers can range in size and complexity from a simple lightweight wooden structure to major structures extended over 1600 metres. In American English, a pier may be synonymous with a dock.

Contents

Pier may also refer to:

People with the name

Pier is a given name, a form of Peter, which may refer to:

Ford Pier is a Canadian singer-songwriter. He was born in Boston, Massachusetts. He resides in Vancouver. In addition to his solo albums, he has been a member of Jr. Gone Wild and D.O.A. as well as Roots Roundup. He has appeared as a guest musician on albums by Carolyn Mark, Martin Tielli, Showbusiness Giants, Veda Hille, Rheostatics, John Mann and Neko Case.

Harriet Hamilton Pier

Harriet Hamilton Pier Simonds was a lawyer in Wisconsin, United States of America. Her mother and two sisters were also lawyers, at a time when there were only eight female lawyers in Wisconsin.

Other uses

Pier (architecture) architectural upright support for a structure or superstructure

A pier, in architecture, is an upright support for a structure or superstructure such as an arch or bridge. Sections of structural walls between openings (bays) can function as piers.

American College of Physicians organization

The American College of Physicians (ACP) is a national organization of internists, who specialize in the diagnosis, treatment, and care of adults. With 154,000 members, ACP is the largest medical-specialty organization and second-largest physician group in the United States, after the American Medical Association. Its flagship journal, the Annals of Internal Medicine, is considered one of the five top medical journals in the United States and Britain.

Percutaneous intentional extraluminal revascularization is a percutaneous technique used in interventional radiology for limb salvage in patients with lower limb ischemia due to long superficial femoral artery occlusions. This method is intended for those patients who make poor candidates for infrainguinal arterial bypass surgery. A guide wire is intentionally introduced in the subintimal space, after which balloon dilatation is performed to create a new lumen for the blood to flow through. The technique is not without complications but may serve as a "temporary bypass" to provide wound healing and limb salvage.

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