Richard Lockwood

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Dicky Lockwood
RichardLockwood.png
Personal information
Full nameRichard Evison Lockwood
Born11 November 1867
Crigglestone, Wakefield, England
Died10 November 1915(1915-11-10) (aged 47)
Leeds, England
Playing information
Rugby union
Position Three-quarters
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1887 Dewsbury Athletic and Football Club
1894 Heckmondwike
Total00000
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1887–94 England 1458028
–94 Yorkshire 46
Rugby league
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1895–01 Wakefield Trinity 149222

Richard "Dickie"/"Dicky" Evison Lockwood (11 November 1867 [1] – 10 November 1915 [2] ) was a rugby union, and professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1880s, 1890s and 1900s. He played representative level rugby union (RU) for England from 1887 to 1894, [3] and was captain in January and February 1894, [3] and Yorkshire, [4] and at club level for Dewsbury and Heckmondwike, as a Three-quarter, and club level rugby league (RL) for Wakefield Trinity (Heritage No. 33), [5] as a Forward, e.g. front row, back row, or lock. Prior to 3 September 1898, Dewsbury was a rugby union club, and prior to the 1896–97 Northern Rugby Football Union season, Heckmondwike was also a rugby union club.

Contents

Background

Dicky Lockwood was born in Crigglestone, Wakefield, West Riding of Yorkshire, England, and he died aged 47 in Leeds, West Riding of Yorkshire, England.

Biography

Dicky Lockwood was born on 11 November 1867 in Crigglestone. [3] Dicky Lockwood's marriage was registered during first ¼ 1889 in Dewsbury district. [6] Dicky Lockwood was the landlord of The Queen Hotel, Westgate, Heckmondwike. [7]

Rugby union

Lockwood made his international début on Saturday 8 January 1887 in Llanelli against Wales in the 1887 Home Nations Championship. [3] The match was to have been held at Stradey Park, which would have been that ground's first international rugby union match. The game was arranged for 8 January and a temporary stand was erected to allow a seating area so the club could charge higher ticket prices; but on the day the English team refused to play on the ground as the pitch was frozen. [8] The adjacent cricket ground was in better condition, so the match was moved there along with the entire crowd, many members of which were extremely unhappy as they lost their seating area. Of the 14 matches he played for his national side he was on the winning side on 8 occasions. [3] He played his last match for England on Saturday 3 February 1894 at Rectory Field, Blackheath in the England vs Ireland match. [3]

Rugby league

When Heckmondwike converted from the rugby union code to the rugby league code for the 1896–97 Northern Rugby Football Union season, Dicky Lockwood had already transferred from Heckmondwike to Wakefield Trinity the previous season, consequently, he only ever played rugby union for Heckmondwike, he played rugby league for Wakefield Trinity at centre from October 1895 finishing in the 1900–01 season, having scored 31-tries, and 60-goals, scoring 222-points for Wakefield Trinity.

Drop-goals (field-goals)

Lockwood appears to have scored no drop-goals (or field-goals as they are currently known in Australasia), but prior to the 1974–75 season all goals, whether; conversions, penalties, or drop-goals, scored 2-points, consequently prior to this date drop-goals were often not explicitly documented, therefore '0' drop-goals may indicate drop-goals not recorded, rather than no drop-goals scored. In addition, prior to the 1949–50 season, the archaic field-goal was also still a valid means of scoring points.

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References

  1. "Birth details at freebmd.org.uk". freebmd.org.uk. 31 December 2016. Retrieved 1 January 2017.
  2. "Death details at freebmd.org.uk". freebmd.org.uk. 31 December 2016. Retrieved 1 January 2017.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Dicky Lockwood Profile on scrum.com
  4. Philip Gaunt (1969). "Yorkshire Rugby Union - Centenary 1869-1969 (Page-28)". Chadwick Studios/Frederick Duffield & Sons Ltd. ISBN n/a
  5. Graham Williams, Peter Lush, David Farrar (November 2009). "The British Rugby League Records Book [Page-178]". London League Publications Ltd. ISBN   978-1-903659-49-6
  6. "Marriage details at freebmd.org.uk". freebmd.org.uk. 31 December 2016. Retrieved 1 January 2017.
  7. "Charles Alexander Hooper". Clifton Rugby Football Club History. Clifton RFC . Retrieved 24 October 2011.
  8. Godwin (1984), p. 16.
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Andrew Stoddart
Captain
Flag of England.svg
England (RU)

Jan-Feb 1894
Succeeded by
Ernest William Taylor