Robert Downes

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Robert Downes DD (died 20 June 1763) was a Church of Ireland bishop in the mid 18th century. [1]

Doctor of Divinity advanced or honorary academic degree in divinity

Doctor of Divinity is an advanced or honorary academic degree in divinity.

Church of Ireland Anglican church in Ireland

The Church of Ireland is a Christian church in Ireland and an autonomous province of the Anglican Communion. It is organised on an all-Ireland basis and is the second largest Christian church on the island after the Catholic Church. Like other Anglican churches, it has retained elements of pre-Reformation practice, notably its episcopal polity, while rejecting the primacy of the Pope. In theological and liturgical matters, it incorporates many principles of the Reformation, particularly those espoused during the English Reformation. The church self-identifies as being both catholic and Reformed. Within the church, differences exist between those members who are more Catholic-leaning and those who are more Protestant-leaning (evangelical). For historical and cultural reasons, the Church of Ireland is generally identified as a Protestant church.

A bishop is an ordained, consecrated, or appointed member of the Christian clergy who is generally entrusted with a position of authority and oversight.

Downes was the son of an Anglican bishop, Henry Downes. He was educated at Merton College, Oxford. [2] He held incumbencies at Balteagh, Desertmartin and Kilcronaghan and was appointed Prebendary of Comber in 1734. [3] He was Dean of Derry from 1740 until 1744; Bishop of Ferns and Leighlin from 1744 until 1752; [4] Down and Connor from 1752 until 1753 [5] and Raphoe from 1753 until his death on 20 June 1763. [6]

Henry Downes was an eighteenth-century Irish Anglican bishop.

Merton College, Oxford college of the University of Oxford

Merton College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England. Its foundation can be traced back to the 1260s when Walter de Merton, chancellor to Henry III and later to Edward I, first drew up statutes for an independent academic community and established endowments to support it. An important feature of Walter's foundation was that this "college" was to be self-governing and the endowments were directly vested in the Warden and Fellows.

In English ecclesiastical law, the term incumbent refers to the holder of a Church of England parochial charge or benefice. The term "benefice" originally denoted a grant of land for life in return for services. In church law, the duties were spiritual ("spiritualities") and some form of assets to generate revenue were permanently linked to the duties to ensure the support of the office holder. Historically, once in possession of the benefice, the holder had lifelong tenure unless he failed to provide the required minimum of spiritual services or committed a moral offence. With the passing of the Pastoral Measure 1968 and subsequent legislation, this no longer applies, and many ancient benefices have been joined together into a single new one.

Notes

  1. Handbook of British Chronology By Fryde, E. B;. Greenway, D.E;Porter, S; Roy, I: Cambridge, CUP, 1996 ISBN   0-521-56350-X, 0713642556
  2. s:Alumni Oxonienses: the Members of the University of Oxford, 1715-1886/Downes, Robert (1)
  3. "Fasti Ecclesiae Hibernicae: The succession of the prelates Volume 3" Cotton,H. pp342 Dublin, Hodges & Smith, 1848-1878
  4. "Fasti Ecclesiae Hibernicae: The succession of the prelates Volume 2" Cotton,H. p340 Dublin, Hodges & Smith, 1848-1878
  5. "Fasti Ecclesiae Hibernicae: The succession of the prelates Volume 3" Cotton,H. p211 Dublin, Hodges & Smith, 1848-1878
  6. "Fasti Ecclesiae Hibernicae: The succession of the prelates Volume 3" Cotton,H. pp356/7 Dublin, Hodges & Smith, 1848-1878


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