Rushcliffe

Last updated

Borough of Rushcliffe
A wet afternoon in West Bridgford - geograph.org.uk - 2422782.jpg
West Bridgford, the largest settlement in the borough and the administrative centre
RushcliffeINNottinghamshire.svg
Shown within Nottinghamshire
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Constituent country England
Region East Midlands
Administrative county Nottinghamshire
Admin. HQ West Bridgford
Government
  TypeRushcliffe Borough Council
   Leadership:Leader & Cabinet
  Executive: Conservative
   MPs: Ruth Edwards
Robert Jenrick
Area
  Total158.0 sq mi (409.2 km2)
  Rank 84th
Population
 (2021)
  Total119,438
  Rank Ranked 197th
  Density760/sq mi (290/km2)
Ethnicity (2021)
[1]
   Ethnic groups
List
Religion (2021)
[1]
   Religion
List
Time zone UTC+0 (Greenwich Mean Time)
  Summer (DST) UTC+1 (British Summer Time)
ONS code 37UJ (ONS)
E07000176 (GSS)
Ethnicity94.1% White
2.7% S.Asian
1.0% Black
1.3% Mixed
0.9% Chinese or Other [2]

Rushcliffe is a local government district with borough status in south Nottinghamshire, England. Its council is based in West Bridgford. The borough also includes the towns of Bingham and Cotgrave as well as numerous villages and surrounding rural areas. Some of the built-up areas in the north-west of the borough, including West Bridgford, form part of the Nottingham Urban Area.

Contents

The neighbouring districts are Broxtowe, Nottingham, Gedling, Newark and Sherwood, Melton, Charnwood, North West Leicestershire and Erewash.

History

The district was formed on 1 April 1974 under the Local Government Act 1972. The new district covered the whole area of two former districts and part of a third, which were all abolished at the same time: [3]

The new district was named after the ancient Rushcliffe Wapentake, which had covered part of the area. [4] Rushcliffe means "cliff where brushwood grows", from Old English hris "brushwood" and clif "cliff". The new Rushcliffe district was granted borough status from its creation, allowing the chair of the council to take the title of mayor. [5]

Governance

Rushcliffe Borough Council
Rushcliffe Borough Council.svg
Type
Type
Leadership
Debbie Mason,
Conservative
since 25 May 2023
Neil Clarke,
Conservative
since 25 May 2023
Kath Marriott
since 5 March 2020 [6]
Structure
Seats44 councillors
Political groups
Administration (25)
  Conservative (25)
Other parties (19)
  Labour (9)
  Independent (5)
  Green (2)
  Rushcliffe Ind. (2)
  Liberal Democrat (1)
Elections
First past the post
Last election
4 May 2023
Next election
2027
Meeting place
Rushcliffe Arena.jpg
Rushcliffe Arena, Rugby Road, West Bridgford, Nottingham, NG2 7YG
Website
www.rushcliffe.gov.uk
Bingham, the second-largest settlement in the borough Bingham Buttercross - geograph.org.uk - 3548043.jpg
Bingham, the second-largest settlement in the borough
Cotgrave, the third-largest settlement in the borough All Saints church, Cotgrave - geograph.org.uk - 3227871.jpg
Cotgrave, the third-largest settlement in the borough

Rushcliffe Borough Council provides district-level services. County-level services are provided by Nottinghamshire County Council. Most of the borough is also covered by civil parishes, which form a third tier of local government. [7]

Political control

The council has been under Conservative majority control since 1999.

The first election to the council was held in 1973, initially operating as a shadow authority alongside the outgoing authorities until the new arrangements came into effect on 1 April 1974. Political control of the council since 1974 has been as follows: [8] [9]

Party in controlYears
Conservative 1974–1995
No overall control 1995–1999
Conservative 1999–present

Leadership

The role of mayor is largely ceremonial in Rushcliffe. Political leadership is instead provided by the leader of the council. The leaders since 2005 have been: [10]

CouncillorPartyFromTo
Neil Clarke [11] Conservative May 200525 May 2017
Simon Robinson Conservative 25 May 20177 May 2023
Neil Clarke Conservative 25 May 2023

Composition

Following the 2023 election, the composition of the council was: [12]

PartyCouncillors
Conservative 25
Labour 9
Independent 5
Green 2
Rushcliffe Independents2
Liberal Democrats 1
Total44

Of the five independent councillors, three sit together as the "Leake Independents" group and two sit together as the "Bingham Independents" group. [13] The next election is due in 2027.

Premises

Rushcliffe Civic Centre, West Bridgford: Council's offices 1982-2016. Rushcliffe Civic Centre - geograph.org.uk - 608017.jpg
Rushcliffe Civic Centre, West Bridgford: Council's offices 1982–2016.

The council is based at the Ruscliffe Arena on Rugby Road in West Bridgford. The building is a combined leisure centre and council headquarters. The council moved into the new building in December 2016 and the leisure centre opened the following month. [14] From 1982 to 2016 the council was based at Rushcliffe Civic Centre on Pavilion Road in West Bridgford, overlooking Trent Bridge. That building had been built in 1966 as a hotel called the Bridgford Hotel. [15] [16]

Elections

Since the last boundary changes in 2023 the council has comprised 44 councillors representing 24 wards, with each ward electing one, two or three councillors. Elections are held every four years. [17]

Wards

The wards are: [17]

Wider politics

The borough straddles two parliamentary constituencies. Most of the borough is in the Rushcliffe constituency. The north-eastern part of the borough around Bingham and surrounding villages is in the Newark constituency. [18]

Geography

South-east of Nottingham, the Rushcliffe boundary splits from the City of Nottingham boundary near the Holme Pierrepont Watersports Centre and then follows the River Trent to near RAF Syerston, which is the most northern part of the district, although Syerston the village itself is in the Newark and Sherwood district. It meets the River Devon near Cotham, then follows this river to the east southwards to where it meets the Leicestershire boundary. To the south, the Leicestershire/Rushcliffe boundary crosses the runways of the former RAF Langar with most of the airfield in Rushcliffe.

Rushcliffe is split between an urbanised north-west, containing suburbs of Greater Nottingham that have not been incorporated into the city, and the south and east which is predominantly rural, which stretches to the Leicestershire border. Many of these villages lie in the Vale of Belvoir. The Grantham Canal threads from nearby Grantham through Rushcliffe to the River Trent. Villages in the Vale of Belvoir include Redmile, Hickling, Harby, Stathern and Langar. Geographically, the River Soar marks the divide between the two counties.

Towns and parishes

The former West Bridgford Urban District is an unparished area. [18] The rest of the borough is divided into civil parishes. The parish councils for Bingham and Cotgrave take the style "town council". Some of the smaller parishes have a parish meeting rather than a parish council. [19]

Media

In terms of television, Rushcliffe is served by BBC East Midlands and ITV Central with television signals received from the Waltham transmitter [20] and the Nottingham relay transmitter. [21]

Radio stations for the area are:

Education

Rushcliffe Spencer Academy and West Bridgford school have ranked regularly in the top 100 comprehensive schools in the UK for GCSE results. In 2014 West Bridgford was ranked at 63rd of all comprehensives in the UK with 83% achieving '5+ A*-C GCSEs (or equivalent) including English and maths GCSEs' and Rushcliffe 81st in the UK with 82% achieving 5 A*-C in 2014. [22]

The Becket School (partly geographically outside the Rushcliffe district), West Bridgford School and Rushcliffe Spencer Academy get A level results for 'Average point score per A level student (full-time equivalent)' in the top 10% of all schools in the UK, comprehensive or selective, better than many English grammar schools. [23] These scores are in the top 2% for all UK comprehensives.

Sutton Bonington is in the south of the district, which has the Sutton Bonington Campus of the University of Nottingham.

Notable residents

Arms

Coat of arms of Rushcliffe
Crest
On a wreath Or and Vert within a mural crown Or charged with three oak leaves a cliff surrounded by rushes Proper.
Escutcheon
Per chevron Sable and Vert in chief two bears salient respectant and in base a representation of the Bingham Butter Cross Or on a chief Argent a barrulet wavy Azure rising therefrom a bridge of three arches Or.
Motto
Salus Populi (The Welfare Of The People) [24]

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Nottinghamshire</span> County of England

Nottinghamshire is a ceremonial county in the East Midlands of England. The county borders South Yorkshire to the north-west, Lincolnshire to the east, Leicestershire to the south, and Derbyshire to the west. The largest settlement is the city of Nottingham (323,632).

<span class="mw-page-title-main">North West Leicestershire</span> Non-metropolitan district in England

North West Leicestershire is a local government district in Leicestershire, England. The council is based in Coalville, the area's largest town. The district also contains the towns of Ashby-de-la-Zouch, Ashby Woulds and Ibstock, along with numerous villages and surrounding rural areas.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">East Staffordshire</span> Non-metropolitan district and Borough in England

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<span class="mw-page-title-main">Borough of Melton</span> Borough and non-metropolitan district in England

Melton is a local government district with borough status in north-eastern Leicestershire, England. It is named after its only town, Melton Mowbray. The borough also includes numerous villages and surrounding rural areas. The north of the district includes part of the Vale of Belvoir. Melton is the least populous district of its type and the fourth least populous district in England overall.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Borough of Erewash</span> Borough in eastern Derbyshire, England

Erewash is a local government district with borough status in Derbyshire, England. The borough is named after the River Erewash. The council has offices in both the borough's towns of Ilkeston and Long Eaton. The borough also includes several villages and surrounding rural areas. Some of the built-up areas in the east of the borough form part of the Nottingham Urban Area.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Bingham, Nottinghamshire</span> Town and civil parish in Nottinghamshire, England

Bingham is a market town and civil parish in the Rushcliffe borough of Nottinghamshire, England, 9 miles (14 km) east of Nottingham, 12 miles south-west of Newark-on-Trent and 15 miles west of Grantham. The town had a population of 9,131 at the 2011 census, with the population now sitting at 10,080 from the results of the 2021 census data.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">West Bridgford</span> Town in Nottinghamshire, England

West Bridgford is a town and the administrative centre of the Borough of Rushcliffe, in the county of Nottinghamshire, England. It lies south of Nottingham city centre, east of Wilford, north of Ruddington and west of Radcliffe-on-Trent. It is also southwest of Colwick and southeast of Beeston which are on the opposite bank of the River Trent. The town is part of the Nottingham Urban Area and had a population of 36,487 in a 2021-census.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Gamston, Rushcliffe</span> Village and civil parish in Nottinghamshire, England

Gamston is a village, civil parish and suburb of West Bridgford, in the Rushcliffe district of Nottinghamshire, England. It is situated approximately 3 miles (5 km) south-east of Nottingham, and the same distance east of West Bridgford. The population as of 2021 census was 2,173.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Rushcliffe (UK Parliament constituency)</span> Nottinghamshire constituency from 1885

Rushcliffe is a constituency in Nottinghamshire represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament from 2019 by Ruth Edwards, a Conservative.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Newark (UK Parliament constituency)</span> Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom, 1885 onwards

Newark is a constituency in Nottinghamshire, England. It is currently represented by Robert Jenrick of the Conservative Party who won the seat in a by-election on 5 June 2014, following the resignation of Patrick Mercer in April 2014.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Car Colston</span> English Midland village in Nottinghamshire, England

Car Colston is an English village and civil parish in the Rushcliffe borough of Nottinghamshire. The population of the civil parish at the time of the 2011 census was 185, falling to 171 at the 2021 census.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Bingham Wapentake</span>

Bingham was a wapentake of the historic county of Nottinghamshire, England. It was in the south-east of the county, to the south of the River Trent.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Nottinghamshire County Council</span> The upper-tier local authority for the non-metropolitan county of Nottinghamshire in England

Nottinghamshire County Council is the upper-tier local authority for the non-metropolitan county of Nottinghamshire in England. It consists of 66 county councillors, elected from 56 electoral divisions every four years. The most recent election was held in 2021.

Rushcliffe Spencer Academy is a secondary school with academy status in the Rushcliffe district of Nottinghamshire and is situated on Boundary Road in West Bridgford, the administrative centre of the Borough of Rushcliffe. It is ranked regularly in the top 100 comprehensive schools in the UK for GCSE results and is in the top 2% of UK comprehensives for A Level results. The School is recognised as Outstanding by Ofsted in all categories.

Rushcliffe Borough Council elections are held every four years. Rushcliffe Borough Council is the local authority for the non-metropolitan district of Rushcliffe in Nottinghamshire, England. Since the last boundary changes in 2023 the council has comprised 44 councillors representing 24 wards, with each ward electing one, two or three councillors.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Langar cum Barnstone</span> Civil parish in England

Langar cum Barnstone is a civil parish in the Rushcliffe borough, within the county of Nottinghamshire, England. The overall area had a population of 962 at the 2021 census, a drop from 980 of the 2011 census. The parish lies near the county border with Leicestershire. It lies 120 miles north of London, 4 miles south east of Bingham and 12 miles south east from the city of Nottingham.

The 2023 Rushcliffe Borough Council election took place on 4 May 2023, to elect all 44 members of Rushcliffe Borough Council in Nottinghamshire, England. This was on the same day as other local elections across England.

References

  1. 1 2 UK Census (2021). "2021 Census Area Profile – Rushcliffe Local Authority (E07000176)". Nomis. Office for National Statistics . Retrieved 5 January 2024.
  2. http://www.neighbourhood.statistics.gov.uk/dissemination/LeadTableView.do?a=3&b=277083&c=rushcliffe&d=13&e=13&g=479699&i=1001x1003x1004&m=0&r=1&s=1212004187468&enc=1&dsFamilyId=1812 [ dead link ]
  3. "The English Non-metropolitan Districts (Definition) Order 1972", legislation.gov.uk , The National Archives, SI 1972/2039, retrieved 31 May 2023
  4. "The English Non-metropolitan Districts (Names) Order 1973", legislation.gov.uk , The National Archives, SI 1973/551, retrieved 31 May 2023
  5. "District Councils and Boroughs". Parliamentary Debates (Hansard) . 28 March 1974. Retrieved 4 December 2021.
  6. "Kath Marriott named Chief Executive at Rushcliffe Borough Council". Nottingham Local News. 6 April 2020. Retrieved 2 July 2023.
  7. "Local Government Act 1972", legislation.gov.uk , The National Archives, 1972 c. 70, retrieved 31 May 2023
  8. "Compositions calculator". The Elections Centre. Retrieved 10 August 2022.
  9. "Rushcliffe". BBC News Online . Retrieved 24 October 2009.
  10. "Council minutes". Rushcliffe Borough Council. Retrieved 19 August 2022.
  11. Breese, Chris (24 May 2017). "Rushcliffe Borough Council leader Neil Clarke stands down". Notts TV. Retrieved 19 August 2022.
  12. "Local elections 2023: live council results for England". The Guardian.
  13. "Your councillors by party". Rushcliffe Borough Council. Retrieved 3 July 2023.
  14. "Borough Council on the move". Rushcliffe Business Partnership. Retrieved 3 July 2023.
  15. "Area's first big hotel for 60 years: Now a Trent Bridge view for visitors". Nottingham Evening Post. 28 June 1966. p. 13. Retrieved 3 July 2023.
  16. "Rushcliffe Hotel HQ". Nottingham Recorder. 29 July 1982. p. 8. Retrieved 3 July 2023.
  17. 1 2 "The Rushcliffe (Electoral Changes) Order 2022", legislation.gov.uk , The National Archives, SI 2022/1364, retrieved 3 July 2023
  18. 1 2 "Election Maps". Ordnance Survey. Retrieved 3 July 2023.
  19. "Parish council contact details". Rushcliffe Borough Council. Retrieved 3 July 2023.
  20. "Waltham (Leicestershire, England) Full Freeview transmitter". May 2004.
  21. "Nottingham (Nottinghamshire, England) Full Freeview transmitter". May 2004.
  22. "DfE". www.education.gov.uk. DfE. Retrieved 2 February 2015.
  23. "DfE". www.education.gov.uk/. DfE. Retrieved 2 February 2015.
  24. "East Midlands Region". Civic Heraldry of England. Retrieved 8 March 2021.

Commons-logo.svg Media related to Rushcliffe at Wikimedia Commons

52°54′N1°03′W / 52.90°N 1.05°W / 52.90; -1.05