The Road to Glory

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The Road to Glory
The Road to Glory (1936) 1.jpg
Directed by Howard Hawks
Produced by Darryl F. Zanuck
Screenplay by Joel Sayre,
William Faulkner
StarringFredric March
Warner Baxter
Lionel Barrymore
Cinematography Gregg Toland
Production
company
Distributed byTwentieth Century Fox
Release date
  • September 4, 1936 (1936-09-04)
Running time
103 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Box office$1 million [1]

The Road to Glory is a 1936 dramatic film depiction of World War I trench warfare in France directed by Howard Hawks, starring Fredric March, Warner Baxter, Lionel Barrymore, and June Lang, and produced by 20th Century Fox.

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Plot

Cast

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