The Second World War (disambiguation)

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The Second World War was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945.

The Second World War may also refer to:

<i>The Second World War</i> (book series) literary work by Winston Churchill

The Second World War is a history of the period from the end of the First World War to July 1945, written by Winston Churchill. Churchill labelled the "moral of the work" as follows: "In War: Resolution, In Defeat: Defiance, In Victory: Magnanimity, In Peace: Goodwill".

<i>The Second World War</i> (book) book by Antony Beevor

The Second World War is a narrative history of World War II by British historian Antony Beevor. The book starts with the Japanese invasion of Manchuria in 1931, and covers the entire Second World War ending with the final surrender of Axis forces.

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Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse figures, described in Book of Revelation 6:1–8; 4 beings on white, red, black and pale horses that appear after the Lamb of God opens the first 4 of the 7 seals; commonly interpreted as Pestilence, War, Famine, and Death

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A. J. P. Taylor English historian

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A world war is a large-scale war which affects the whole world directly or indirectly. World wars span multiple countries on multiple continents or just two countries, with battles fought in many theaters. While a variety of global conflicts have been subjectively deemed "world wars", such as the Cold War and the War on Terror, the term is widely and usually accepted only as it is retrospectively applied to two major international conflicts that occurred during the 20th century: World War I (1914–18) and World War II (1939–45).

<i>The World at War</i> British television documentary series about the Second World War

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Antony Beevor English military historian

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<i>Germany and the Second World War</i> book series

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<i>The War of the Worlds</i> novel by H. G. Wells

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<i>The Deceivers: Allied Military Deception in the Second World War</i>

The Deceivers: Allied Military Deception in the Second World War, by Thaddeus Holt, is a 2004 historical account of Allied military deception during the Second World War. The book focuses primarily on the work of Dudley Clarke in the Middle East, John Bevan in London, Newman Smith in Washington, and Peter Fleming in the Far East, detailing their work in creating strategic and tactical deceptions for the Allied forces.

Lincolns Inn War Memorial war memorial in London

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<i>Wrath of the Immortals</i>

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