Thomas Lupton

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Thomas Lupton
BornNovember 1628 [1]
East Morton, West Yorkshire, England [2]
Died1684
Resting place Norwalk, Connecticut
Residence Norwalk, Connecticut Colony [3]
Spouse(s)Hannah Morris (m. 1662, New Haven Colony)
ChildrenThomas, Hannah (b. May 27, 1665, New Haven Colony)

Thomas Lupton (1628–1684) was a founding settler of Norwalk, Connecticut. His name appears in the early records of the settlement, but little is known, and his name also disappears soon thereafter. He apparently came to Norwalk in 1655 from the New Haven Colony. He was named a freeman in 1664.

Settler person who has migrated to an area and established permanent residence there

A settler is a person who has migrated to an area and established a permanent residence there, often to colonize the area. Settlers are generally from a sedentary culture, as opposed to nomads who share and rotate their settlements with little or no concept of individual land ownership. Settlements are often built on land already claimed or owned by another group. Many times settlers are backed by governments or large countries. They also sometimes leave in search of religious freedom.

Norwalk, Connecticut City in Connecticut, United States

Norwalk is a U.S. city located in southwestern Connecticut, in southern Fairfield County, on the northern shore of Long Island Sound. Norwalk is included statistically within both the New York metropolitan area as well as the Bridgeport metropolitan area.

Connecticut state of the United States of America

Connecticut is the southernmost state in the New England region of the United States. As of the 2010 Census, it has the highest per-capita income, Human Development Index (0.962), and median household income in the United States. It is bordered by Rhode Island to the east, Massachusetts to the north, New York to the west, and Long Island Sound to the south. Its capital is Hartford and its most populous city is Bridgeport. It is part of New England, although portions of it are often grouped with New York and New Jersey as the Tri-state area. The state is named for the Connecticut River which approximately bisects the state. The word "Connecticut" is derived from various anglicized spellings of an Algonquian word for "long tidal river".

He settled on home-lot number 27, which was toward the rear of the main line of lots in the settlement. His daughter Hannah married Ebenezer Blakeley. Hannah and Ebenezer had a daughter also named Hannah who married John Nash, and together are the ancestors of prominent Nash family of Norwalk.

In July 1668, he was chosen by the settlement congregation to look after the children during church services, so as to keep "them from playing and unssivil[ sic ] behavior in time of public worship". [4]

The Latin adverb sic inserted after a quoted word or passage indicates that the quoted matter has been transcribed or translated exactly as found in the source text, complete with any erroneous, archaic, or otherwise nonstandard spelling. It also applies to any surprising assertion, faulty reasoning, or other matter that might be likely interpreted as an error of transcription.

He is listed on the Founders Stone bearing the names of the founding settlers of Norwalk in the East Norwalk Historical Cemetery.

History of Norwalk, Connecticut

The history of Norwalk, Connecticut ranges from pre-contact cultures and Native Americans to the 21st century.

East Norwalk Historical Cemetery

Established in 1655, the East Norwalk Historical Cemetery is Norwalk's oldest cemetery, and many of the area's first settlers are buried there. The cemetery is owned and maintained by the Third Taxing District, formally known as the East Norwalk Fire District of the Town of Norwalk, and before that it was known as the Down Town School District. Triangle shaped and surrounded clockwise by Gregory Boulevard, Cemetery Street and East Avenue it is situated in the neighborhood of East Norwalk 41°6′9.22″N73°24′11.95″W.

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