Thomas Randall

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Thomas Randolph (poet) English poet and dramatist

Thomas Randolph was an English poet and dramatist.

Durham School Independent school in Durham, England

Durham School is an English independent boarding school for pupils aged between 3 and 18 years. Founded by the Bishop of Durham, Thomas Langley, in 1414, it received royal foundation by King Henry VIII in 1541 following the Dissolution of the Monasteries during the Protestant Reformation. It is the city's oldest institution of learning.

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This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 1937.

Randolph Jefferson was the younger brother of Thomas Jefferson and a planter.

Randall Davidson Scottish Archbishop of Canterbury

Randall Thomas Davidson, 1st Baron Davidson of Lambeth, was an Anglican bishop of Scottish origin who served as Archbishop of Canterbury from 1903 to 1928. Adrian Hastings said he was perhaps the most influential of the churchmen, because he was:

Sons of Ben were followers of Ben Jonson in English poetry and drama in the first half of the seventeenth century. These men followed Ben Jonson's philosophy and his style of poetry. These men, unlike Jonson, were loyal to the king.

Newnham, Northamptonshire village in Northamptonshire

Newnham is a village in the Daventry district of the county of Northamptonshire in England. The village is 2 miles (3.2 km) south of Daventry, 3 miles (4.8 km) west from Weedon Bec, 6 miles (9.7 km) west of junction 16 of the M1 motorway and 11 miles (18 km) west of Northampton. The A45 road runs a mile northwest of the village. The nearest railway station is at Long Buckby, 8 miles (13 km) northeast.

Shadwell, Virginia CDP in Virginia, United States

Shadwell is a census-designated place (CDP) in Albemarle County, Virginia, United States, located by the Rivanna River near Charlottesville. The birthplace of Thomas Jefferson, it was named for the Shadwell parish in London by his father, Peter Jefferson, a colonist and planter in central Virginia. Shadwell is the parish where his wife Jane Randolph had been christened. Peter Jefferson and Jane Randolph had six children, among them Thomas, who would become the third president of the United States. Active in county meetings Peter was appointed Justice of the Peace of Albemarle county, taking his oath in September 1744. The following month he was appointed lieutenant colonel to the Albemarle county militia.

The Pushcart Prize is an American literary prize published by Pushcart Press that honors the best "poetry, short fiction, essays or literary whatnot" published in the small presses over the previous year. Magazine and small book press editors are invited to submit up to six works they have featured. Anthologies of the selected works have been published annually since 1976. It is supported and staffed by volunteers.

William Randolph American politician,born 1650

William Randolph I was an American colonist, landowner, planter, merchant, and politician who played an important role in the history and government of the English colony of Virginia. He moved to Virginia sometime between 1669 and 1673, and married Mary Isham a few years later. His descendants include many prominent individuals including Thomas Jefferson, John Marshall, Paschal Beverly Randolph, Robert E. Lee, Peyton Randolph, Edmund Randolph, John Randolph of Roanoke, George W. Randolph, and Edmund Ruffin. Genealogists have taken an interest in him for his progeny's many marital alliances, referring to him and Mary Isham as "the Adam and Eve of Virginia".

Jefferson–Hemings controversy

The Jefferson–Hemings controversy is a historical debate over whether a sexual relationship between U.S. President Thomas Jefferson and his slave, Sally Hemings resulted in his fathering some or all of her six recorded children. For more than 150 years, most historians denied rumors from Jefferson's presidency that he had a slave concubine. Based on his grandson's report, they said that one of his nephews had been the father of Hemings' children. Before changing his mind following the results of DNA analysis in 1998, Jefferson biographer Joseph J. Ellis had said, "The alleged liaison between Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings may be described as the longest-running miniseries in American history."

Great Russell Street street

Great Russell Street is a street in Bloomsbury, London, best known for being the location of the British Museum. It runs between Tottenham Court Road in the west, and Southampton Row in the east. It is one-way only (eastbound) between its western origin at Tottenham Court Road and Bloomsbury Street.

Randolph "Randall" or "Ole Ran'l" McCoy was the patriarch of the McCoy clan involved in the infamous American Hatfield–McCoy feud. He was born the fourth of thirteen children to Daniel McCoy (1790–1885) and Margaret Taylor McCoy (1800–1868) and lived mostly on the Kentucky side of Tug Fork, a tributary of the Big Sandy River.

<i>Plectranthias</i> genus of fishes

Plectranthias is a genus of fish in the family Serranidae found in the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Ocean.

Thomas Jefferson Randolph American planter and politician, grandson of Thomas Jefferson

Thomas Jefferson Randolph of Albemarle County was a planter and politician who served in the Virginia House of Delegates, was rector of the University of Virginia, and was a colonel in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. He was notable as the oldest grandson of President Thomas Jefferson. He helped manage Monticello near the end of his grandfather's life and was executor of his estate.

<i>The Thundering Herd</i> (1925 film) 1925 film by Henry Hathaway, William K. Howard

The Thundering Herd is a lost 1925 American Western lost film directed by William K. Howard, and starring Jack Holt, Lois Wilson, Noah Beery, Sr. and Raymond Hatton. Based on Zane Grey's 1925 novel of the same name and written by Lucien Hubbard, the film is about a trader who uncovers a scheme to blame the Indians for a Buffalo massacre.

Randall is a surname.

William Heminges, also Hemminges, Heminge, and other variants, was a playwright and theatrical figure of the Caroline period. He was the ninth child and third son of John Heminges, the actor and colleague of William Shakespeare.

Nationality words link to articles with information on the nation's poetry or literature.

Events from the year 1834 in Scotland.