Thomas Rider

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Thomas Rider may refer to:

Thomas Rider was a British Whig politician who held a seat in the House of Commons from 1831 to 1835. He was the eldest son of Ingram Rider of Leeds, Yorkshire and educated at Charterhouse School (1776) and University College, Oxford (1783).

Windsor (UK Parliament constituency) Parliamentary constituency in the United Kingdom

Windsor /ˈwɪnzə/ is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2005 by Adam Afriyie of the Conservative Party.

Thomas Rider (MP for Maidstone) English politician

Thomas Rider, of Boughton Monchelsea Place, Kent, was an English politician.

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Sir Barnham Rider, of Boughton Monchelsea Place, Kent, was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1716 to 1727.

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