Thomas Speed

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Thomas Speed (October 25, 1768 – February 20, 1842) was a U.S. Representative from Kentucky.

United States House of Representatives lower house of the United States Congress

The United States House of Representatives is the lower chamber of the United States Congress, the Senate being the upper chamber. Together they compose the legislature of the United States.

Kentucky State of the United States of America

Kentucky, officially the Commonwealth of Kentucky, is a state located in the east south-central region of the United States. Although styled as the "State of Kentucky" in the law creating it, (because in Kentucky's first constitution, the name state was used) Kentucky is one of four U.S. states constituted as a commonwealth. Originally a part of Virginia, in 1792 Kentucky split from it and became the 15th state to join the Union. Kentucky is the 37th most extensive and the 26th most populous of the 50 United States.

Born in Charlotte County, Virginia, Speed was taught by his father Captain James Speed. He moved with his parents to Kentucky in 1782. He was employed in the office of the clerk of the general court. He engaged in mercantile pursuits at Danville and Bardstown in 1790. He also engaged in agricultural pursuits. He served as clerk of the Bullitt and Nelson circuit courts. He served as major of Volunteers in the War of 1812.

Charlotte County, Virginia County in the United States

Charlotte County is a United States county located in the south central part of the Commonwealth of Virginia. Its county seat is the town of Charlotte Court House. As of the 2010 census, the county population was 12,586. Charlotte County is predominately rural with a population density of only 26.5 persons per square mile.

War of 1812 32-month military conflict between the United States and the British Empire

The War of 1812 was a conflict fought between the United States, the United Kingdom, and their respective allies from June 1812 to February 1815. Historians in Britain often see it as a minor theater of the Napoleonic Wars; in the United States and Canada, it is seen as a war in its own right.

Speed was elected as a Democratic-Republican to the Fifteenth Congress (March 4, 1817 – March 3, 1819). He was an unsuccessful candidate for reelection. He resumed agricultural pursuits. He also contributed articles to the National Intelligencer , Washington, D.C.. He served as member of the State house of representatives in 1821, 1822, and again in 1840. He was a member of the Whig Party when it was organized. He died on his farm, near Bardstown, Kentucky, February 20, 1842. He was interred on his farm, "Cottage Grove," near Bardstown, Kentucky.

Democratic-Republican Party Historical American political party

The Democratic-Republican Party was an American political party formed by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison around 1792 to oppose the centralizing policies of the new Federalist Party run by Alexander Hamilton, who was Secretary of the Treasury and chief architect of George Washington's administration. From 1801 to 1825, the new party controlled the presidency and Congress as well as most states during the First Party System. It began in 1791 as one faction in Congress and included many politicians who had been opposed to the new constitution. They called themselves Republicans after their political philosophy, republicanism. They distrusted the Federalist tendency to centralize and loosely interpret the Constitution, believing these policies were signs of monarchism and anti-republican values. The party splintered in 1824, with the faction loyal to Andrew Jackson coalescing into the Jacksonian movement, the faction led by John Quincy Adams and Henry Clay forming the National Republican Party and some other groups going on to form the Anti-Masonic Party. The National Republicans, Anti-Masons, and other opponents of Andrew Jackson later formed themselves into the Whig Party.

15th United States Congress

The Fifteenth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met in the Old Brick Capitol in Washington, D.C. from March 4, 1817, to March 4, 1819, during the first two years of James Monroe's presidency. The apportionment of seats in the House of Representatives was based on the Third Census of the United States in 1810. Both chambers had a Democratic-Republican majority.

<i>National Intelligencer</i>

The National Intelligencer newspaper was published in Washington, D.C. from about 1800 until 1870.

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References

The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all present and former members of the United States Congress and its predecessor, the Continental Congress. Also included are Delegates from territories and the District of Columbia and Resident Commissioners from the Philippines and Puerto Rico.

    U.S. House of Representatives
    Preceded by
    Benjamin Hardin
    Member of the  U.S. House of Representatives
    from Kentucky's 10th congressional district

    March 4, 1817 March 3, 1819
    Succeeded by
    Benjamin Hardin

    PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress website http://bioguide.congress.gov .