Thomas Sullivan (author)

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Thomas Sullivan is the author of some eighty short stories and novels.

Short story Brief work of literature, usually written in narrative prose

A short story is a piece of prose fiction that typically can be read in one sitting and focuses on a self-contained incident or series of linked incidents, with the intent of evoking a "single effect" or mood, however there are many exceptions to this.

Novel narrative text, normally of a substantial length and in the form of prose describing a fictional and sequential story

A novel is a relatively long work of narrative fiction, normally written in prose form, and which is typically published as a book.

Contents

His work involves characters in intensely psychological situations that range from thrillers (The Water Wolf) to comedy (The Phases of Harry Moon). Awards and recognitions are for literary and genre fiction. He has lived in Lathrup Village, Michigan. [1]

Genre fiction, also known as popular fiction, is a term used in the book-trade for fictional works written with the intent of fitting into a specifically literary genre, in order to appeal to readers and fans already familiar with that genre.

Lathrup Village, Michigan City in Michigan, United States

Lathrup Village is a city in Oakland County in the U.S. state of Michigan. The population was 4,075 at the 2010 census. This city is surrounded by the city of Southfield. The I-696 / Reuther Freeway goes through nearly the east-west center of town, and Southfield Road goes nearly through the north-south center. The Southfield Town Center, formerly known as the Prudential Town Center, is within walking distance of the southwest corner of the city.

Awards, Honors and Prizes

Nominations include

Nebula Award literature prize for science fiction and fantasy works from the United States

The Nebula Awards annually recognize the best works of science fiction or fantasy published in the United States. The awards are organized and awarded by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), a nonprofit association of professional science fiction and fantasy writers. They were first given in 1966 at a ceremony created for the awards, and are given in four categories for different lengths of literary works. A fifth category for film and television episode scripts was given 1974–78 and 2000–09, and a sixth category for video game writing was begun in 2018. The rules governing the Nebula Awards have changed several times during the awards' history, most recently in 2010. The SFWA Nebula Conference, at which the awards are announced and presented, is held each spring in the United States. Locations vary from year to year.

Listed in

He is listed in:

Who's Who is the title of a number of reference publications, generally containing concise biographical information on the prominent people of a country.

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References

  1. information sourced from Library of Congress Authorities data, via corresponding WorldCat Identities  linked authority file (LAF) .

The Internet Speculative Fiction Database (ISFDB) is a database of bibliographic information on genres considered speculative fiction, including science fiction and related genres such as fantasy fiction and horror fiction. The ISFDB is a volunteer effort, with both the database and wiki being open for editing and user contributions. The ISFDB database and code are available under Creative Commons licensing and there is support within both Wikipedia and ISFDB for interlinking. The data are reused by other organizations, such as Freebase, under the creative commons license.