Thomas Taylor (artist)

Last updated
Thomas Taylor
BornThomas Henry Taylor
(1973-05-22) 22 May 1973 (age 46)
England [1]
OccupationIllustrator, writer
Nationality British
GenreChildren's books (as illustrator)

Thomas Henry Taylor (born 22 May 1973) [1] is a British children's writer and illustrator. He studied at Anglia Ruskin University. He painted the cover art for the first edition of Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone . [2] Due to the number of questions regarding the identity of the wizard illustrated on the back cover of the first edition of Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, and thanks to the contribution of an Argentine named Alfonso Ferrer in Taylor's blog, in February 2016, he decided to name him Robertus Tallis. [3]

Anglia Ruskin University public university in the East of England, United Kingdom

Anglia Ruskin University (ARU) is a public university in East Anglia, United Kingdom. It has 39,400 students worldwide and has campuses in Cambridge, Chelmsford, Peterborough and London. It also shares campuses with the College of West Anglia in King's Lynn, Wisbech and Cambridge.

<i>Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone</i> 1997 fantasy novel by J. K. Rowling

Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone is a fantasy novel written by British author J. K. Rowling. The first novel in the Harry Potter series and Rowling's debut novel, it follows Harry Potter, a young wizard who discovers his magical heritage on his eleventh birthday, when he receives a letter of acceptance to Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. Harry makes close friends and a few enemies during his first year at the school, and with the help of his friends, Harry faces an attempted comeback by the dark wizard Lord Voldemort, who killed Harry's parents, but failed to kill Harry when he was just 15 months old.

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He attended the Norwich School of Art and Design. Then he spent three years at art school in Cambridge. After finishing his education he found his first job at Heffer’s Children’s Bookshop. In his spare time he was looking for something that was close to his desires - books illustrations. And in about a year he was offered to do a book cover by Bloomsbury Publishing. It happened to be the first book by J. K. Rowling about Harry Potter. And along with books illustrations he began writing books for children by himself and soon found out that it was much of his interest and really a work that he was always dreaming about. And his childhood desire to see ghosts' world at last could be realized in writing books, because everything is possible in stories. That is how he lived his idea in Haunters, his "first novel for early teens". [4]

Bloomsbury Publishing plc is a British independent, worldwide publishing house of fiction and non-fiction. It is a constituent of the FTSE SmallCap Index. Bloomsbury's head office is located in Bloomsbury, an area of the London Borough of Camden. It has a US publishing office located in New York City, an India publishing office in New Delhi, an Australia sales office in Sydney CBD and other publishing offices in the UK including at Oxford. The company's growth over the past two decades is primarily attributable to the Harry Potter series by J. K. Rowling and, from 2008, to the development of its academic and professional publishing division. The Bloomsbury Academic & Professional division won the Bookseller Industry Award for Academic, Educational & Professional Publisher of the Year in both 2013 and 2014.

J. K. Rowling English novelist

Joanne Rowling, , writing under the pen names J. K. Rowling and Robert Galbraith, is a British novelist, philanthropist, film producer, television producer and screenwriter, best known for writing the Harry Potter fantasy series. The books have won multiple awards, and sold more than 500 million copies, becoming the best-selling book series in history. They have also been the basis for a film series, over which Rowling had overall approval on the scripts and was a producer on the final films in the series.

He has written and illustrated several picture books, starting with George and Sophie's Museum Adventure in 1999, and has two children's novels, Haunters and Dan of the Dead. [5] The first one eas published in May, 2012 by The Chicken House and the last one was published on 1 June 2012 by Bloomsbury Publishing PLC. Dan of the Dead sequel named Dan and the Caverns of Bone was issued in June, 2013. The book The Pets You Get with his illustrations won the Stockport Schools’ Book Award in 2013 (early years category) and also the Oldham Brilliant Books Award. [6]

The Chicken House is a publishing company owned by Scholastic Corporation, specialising in children's fiction.

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References

  1. 1 2 The U.S. Library of Congress cites 2001 and 2002 communications with a publisher for Taylor's full name, birth date, and birthplace England. "Taylor, Thomas, 1973–". Library of Congress Authorities (lccn.loc.gov). Retrieved 4 December 2015.
  2. Thorpe, Vanessa (20 January 2002). "Harry Potter beats Austen in sale rooms". The Observer. Guardian News and Media Limited. Retrieved 21 November 2010.
  3. Taylor, Thomas. "Harry Potter and the Mysterious Wizard". Thomas Taylor.
  4. Bio Retrieved on 2 Feb 2018
  5. Thomas Taylor at Fantastic Fiction
  6. Picture Books Retrieved on 2 Feb 2018

The Internet Speculative Fiction Database (ISFDB) is a database of bibliographic information on genres considered speculative fiction, including science fiction and related genres such as fantasy fiction and horror fiction. The ISFDB is a volunteer effort, with both the database and wiki being open for editing and user contributions. The ISFDB database and code are available under Creative Commons licensing and there is support within both Wikipedia and ISFDB for interlinking. The data are reused by other organizations, such as Freebase, under the creative commons license.

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