Thomas Thwaites

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Sir Thomas Thwaites or Thwaytes (c.1435–1503) was an English civil servant, who was involved in the Perkin Warbeck conspiracy.

Perkin Warbeck Imposter-pretender to the throne of England

Perkin Warbeck was a pretender to the English throne. Warbeck claimed to be Richard of Shrewsbury, Duke of York, who was the second son of Edward IV and one of the so-called "Princes in the Tower". Richard, if he was alive, would have been the rightful claimant to the throne, assuming that his elder brother Edward V was dead, and that he was legitimate – a contentious point.

He served as Edward IV's Chancellor of the Exchequer from 1471 to 1483 and Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster between 2 April 1478 and 7 July 1483. Upon the ascension of Richard III he was knighted and moved to Treasurer of Calais, where he served from 1483 to 1490. [1]

Edward IV of England 15th-century King of England

Edward IV was the King of England from 4 March 1461 to 3 October 1470, and again from 11 April 1471 until his death. He was the first Yorkist King of England. The first half of his rule was marred by the violence associated with the Wars of the Roses, but he overcame the Lancastrian challenge to the throne at Tewkesbury in 1471 to reign in peace until his sudden death. Before becoming king, he was Duke of York, Earl of March, Earl of Cambridge and Earl of Ulster.

Chancellor of the Exchequer Senior official in the Cabinet of the United Kingdom responsible for economic and financial matters

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Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster ministerial office in Her Majestys Government

The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster is a ministerial office in the Government of the United Kingdom that includes as part of its duties, the administration of the estates and rents of the Duchy of Lancaster. The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster is appointed by the Sovereign on the advice of the Prime Minister.

He was arrested for treason in 1493 for involvement in the Perkin Warbeck conspiracy. Originally sentenced to death, his sentence was altered to imprisonment in the Tower of London and a fine. [2]

Tower of London A historic castle on the north bank of the River Thames in central London

The Tower of London, officially Her Majesty's Royal Palace and Fortress of the Tower of London, is a historic castle located on the north bank of the River Thames in central London. It lies within the London Borough of Tower Hamlets, separated from the eastern edge of the square mile of the City of London by the open space known as Tower Hill. It was founded towards the end of 1066 as part of the Norman Conquest of England. The White Tower, which gives the entire castle its name, was built by William the Conqueror in 1078 and was a resented symbol of oppression, inflicted upon London by the new ruling elite. The castle was used as a prison from 1100 until 1952, although that was not its primary purpose. A grand palace early in its history, it served as a royal residence. As a whole, the Tower is a complex of several buildings set within two concentric rings of defensive walls and a moat. There were several phases of expansion, mainly under Kings Richard I, Henry III, and Edward I in the 12th and 13th centuries. The general layout established by the late 13th century remains despite later activity on the site.

He owned the manor of Barnes in London.

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References

  1. Rosemary Horrox (14 March 1991). Richard III: A Study of Service. Cambridge University Press. p. 140. ISBN   978-0-521-40726-7.
  2. Ian Arthurson (31 March 2013). The Perkin Warbeck Conspiracy 1491-1499. History Press Limited. ISBN   978-0-7524-9563-7.