Thompson baronets

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There have been seven baronetcies created for persons with the surname Thompson, one in the Baronetage of England, one in the Baronetage of Great Britain and five in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom. Three of the creations are extinct while four are extant. See also Thomson baronets and Meysey-Thompson baronets.

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The Thompson Baronetcy, of Haversham in the County of Buckingham, was created in the Baronetage of England on 12 December 1673 for John Thompson. He was later elevated to the peerage as Baron Haversham. For more information, see this title.

The Thompson Baronetcy, of Virkees in the County of Sussex, was created in the Baronetage of Great Britain on 23 June 1797 for Charles Thompson, who represented Monmouth in the House of Commons. The title became extinct on the death of the third Baronet in 1868.

The Thompson Baronetcy, of Hartsbourne Manor in the County of Hertford, was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom on 11 December 1806 for the naval commander Vice-Admiral Thomas Thompson. He notably commanded HMS Leander at the Battle of the Nile and also sat as Member of Parliament for Rochester.

The Thompson Baronetcy, of Park Gate in Guiseley in the County of York, was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom on 18 April 1890 for Matthew Thompson. He was Chairman of the Forth Bridge and Midland Railway companies and also briefly represented Bradford in Parliament as a Liberal.

The Thompson Baronetcy, of Wimpole Street in the City of London, was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom on 20 February 1899 for the surgeon Sir Henry Thompson. The title became extinct on the death of the second Baronet in 1944.

The Thompson Baronetcy, of Reculver in the County of Kent, was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom on 28 January 1963 for the Conservative politician Richard Thompson. He held several junior ministerial positions, notably as Under-Secretary of State for Commonwealth Relations. As of 2008 the title is held by his son, the second Baronet, who succeeded in 1999.

The Thompson Baronetcy, of Walton-on-the-Hill in the City of Liverpool, was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom on 29 January 1963 for the Conservative politician Kenneth Thompson. He was Chairman of the Merseyside County Council and represented Liverpool, Walton in the House of Commons. As of 2008 the title is held by his son, the second Baronet, who succeeded in 1984.

Thompson baronets, of Haversham (1673)

Thompson baronets, of Virkees (1797)

Thompson baronets, of Hartsbourne Manor (1806)

The heir apparent to the baronetcy is Thomas Boulden Cameron Thompson (born 2006), only son of the 6th Baronet.

Thompson baronets, of Park Gate (1890)

The heir apparent to the baronetcy is Peile Richard Thompson (born 1975), only son of the 6th Baronet.

Thompson baronets, of Wimpole Street (1899)

Thompson baronets, of Reculver (1963)

The heir apparent to the baronetcy is Simon William Thompson (born 1985), eldest son of the 2nd Baronet.

Coat of arms of Thompson baronets
Thompson (of Reculver) Escutcheon.png
Crest
A demi-figure representing a Moorish Prince Proper wreathed about the temples with a torse Argent and Azure vested of a tunic paly Argent and Azure fringed and garnished Or at his back supported by a guige Gules baldrickwise across the right dexter shoulder a quiver Azure replenished with arrows Argent flighted Or from the dexter hand a martlet rising Azure and in the other a bow palewise stringed Gules.
Escutcheon
Azure a bend Argent between two ship's wheels Or. Inescutcheon of pretence paly of six Argent and Azure over all a hand Gules.
Motto
Sapiens Qui Prospicit [1]

Thompson baronets, of Walton-on-the-Hill (1963)

The heir apparent to the baronetcy is Richard Kenneth Spencer Thompson (born 1976), eldest son of the 2nd Baronet.

Coat of arms of Thompson baronets
Crest
A demi figure affronty representing Neptune wreathed about the middle with laver Proper the mantle Gules clasped and crowned with an antique crown Or supporting in the dexter hand a trident Sable and in the sinister a spear Proper.
Escutcheon
Per fess dancetty Argent and Sable of two upward one downward points each ending in a cross potent three swans one in chief and two in base counterchanged .
Motto
Loyalty [2]

Notes

  1. Debrett's Peerage. 2000.
  2. Debrett's Peerage. 2000.

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The Meysey-Thompson Baronetcy, of Kirby Hall in the County of York, was a title in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 26 March 1874 for Harry Meysey-Thompson, Liberal Member of Parliament for Whitby. He was succeeded by his son, the second Baronet. He was a Liberal, and later Liberal Unionist politician. On 26 December 1905 he was created Baron Knaresborough, of Kirby Hall in the County of York, in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. The barony became extinct on his death in 1929 while the baronetcy survived. The presumed fourth Baronet never successfully proved his succession and was never on the Official Roll of the Baronetage. When he died in 2002 the baronetcy became extinct as well.

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See also