Thompson baronets

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There have been seven baronetcies created for persons with the surname Thompson, one in the Baronetage of England, one in the Baronetage of Great Britain and five in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom. Three of the creations are extinct while four are extant. See also Thomson baronets and Meysey-Thompson baronets.

There have been four baronetcies created for persons with the surname Thomson, one in the Baronetage of Nova Scotia and three in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom.

The Meysey-Thompson Baronetcy, of Kirby Hall in the County of York, was a title in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom. It was created on 26 March 1874 for Harry Meysey-Thompson, Liberal Member of Parliament for Whitby. He was succeeded by his son, the second Baronet. He was a Liberal, and later Liberal Unionist politician. On 26 December 1905 he was created Baron Knaresborough, of Kirby Hall in the County of York, in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. The barony became extinct on his death in 1929 while the baronetcy survived. The presumed fourth Baronet never successfully proved his succession and was never on the Official Roll of the Baronetage. When he died in 2002 the baronetcy became extinct as well.

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The Thompson Baronetcy, of Haversham in the County of Buckingham, was created in the Baronetage of England on 12 December 1673 for John Thompson. He was later elevated to the peerage as Baron Haversham. For more information, see this title.

Baron Haversham

Baron Haversham is a title that has been created twice, once in the Peerage of England and once in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. Both creations are extinct. The first creation came on 4 May 1696, when Sir John Thompson, 1st Baronet was created Baron Haversham, of Haversham in the County of Buckingham, in the Peerage of England. He had formerly been Member of Parliament for Gatton and had already been created a Baronet, of Haversham in the County of Buckingham, in the Baronetage of England in 1673. His son, the second Baron, sat as Member of Parliament for Bletchingley and Gatton, before inheriting the title. He had no sons and the barony became extinct on his death on 11 April 1745.

The Thompson Baronetcy, of Virkees in the County of Sussex, was created in the Baronetage of Great Britain on 23 June 1797 for Charles Thompson, who represented Monmouth in the House of Commons. The title became extinct on the death of the third Baronet in 1868.

Monmouth Boroughs was a parliamentary constituency consisting of several towns in Monmouthshire. It returned one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons of the Parliaments of England, Great Britain, and finally the United Kingdom; until 1832 the constituency was known simply as Monmouth, though it included other "contributory boroughs".

The Thompson Baronetcy, of Hartsbourne Manor in the County of Hertford, was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom on 11 December 1806 for the naval commander Vice-Admiral Thomas Thompson. He notably commanded HMS Leander at the Battle of the Nile and also sat as Member of Parliament for Rochester.

Sir Thomas Thompson, 1st Baronet Officer of the British Royal Navy

Sir Thomas Boulden Thompson, 1st Baronet, GCB was an officer of the Royal Navy. He served during the American Revolutionary, French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, eventually rising to the rank of Vice-Admiral. He was one of Horatio Nelson's Band of Brothers at the Battle of the Nile in 1798 and Comptroller of the Navy from 1806-1816.

HMS <i>Leander</i> (1780)

HMS Leander was a Portland-class 50-gun fourth rate of the Royal Navy, launched at Chatham on 1 July 1780. She served on the West Coast of Africa, West Indies, and the Halifax station. During the French Revolutionary Wars she participated in the Battle of the Nile before a French ship captured her. The Russians and Turks recaptured her and returned her to the Royal Navy in 1799. On 23 February 1805, while on the Halifax station, Leander captured the French frigate Ville de Milan and recaptured her prize, HMS Cleopatra. On 25 April 1805 cannon fire from Leander killed an American seaman while Leander was trying to search an American vessel off the US coast for contraband. The resulting "Leander Affair" contributed to the worsening of relations between the United States and Great Britain. In 1813 the Admiralty converted Leander to a hospital ship under the name Hygeia. Hygeia was sold in 1817.

Battle of the Nile 1–3 August 1798

The Battle of the Nile was a major naval battle fought between the British Royal Navy and the Navy of the French Republic at Aboukir Bay on the Mediterranean coast off the Nile Delta of Egypt from the 1st to the 3rd of August 1798. The battle was the climax of a naval campaign that had raged across the Mediterranean during the previous three months, as a large French convoy sailed from Toulon to Alexandria carrying an expeditionary force under General Napoleon Bonaparte. The British fleet was led in the battle by Rear-Admiral Sir Horatio Nelson; they decisively defeated the French under Vice-Admiral François-Paul Brueys d'Aigalliers.

The Thompson Baronetcy, of Park Gate in Guiseley in the County of York, was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom on 18 April 1890 for Matthew Thompson. He was Chairman of the Forth Bridge and Midland Railway companies and also briefly represented Bradford in Parliament as a Liberal.

Bradford was a parliamentary constituency in Bradford, in the West Riding of Yorkshire.

Liberal Party (UK) political party of the United Kingdom, 1859–1988

The Liberal Party was one of the two major parties in the United Kingdom with the opposing Conservative Party in the 19th and early 20th centuries. The party arose from an alliance of Whigs and free trade Peelites and Radicals favourable to the ideals of the American and French Revolutions in the 1850s. By the end of the 19th century, it had formed four governments under William Gladstone. Despite being divided over the issue of Irish Home Rule, the party returned to government in 1905 and then won a landslide victory in the following year's general election.

The Thompson Baronetcy, of Wimpole Street in the City of London, was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom on 20 February 1899 for the surgeon Sir Henry Thompson. The title became extinct on the death of the second Baronet in 1944.

Sir Henry Thompson, 1st Baronet British surgeon and polymath

Sir Henry Thompson, 1st Baronet was a British surgeon and polymath.

The Thompson Baronetcy, of Reculver in the County of Kent, was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom on 28 January 1963 for the Conservative politician Richard Thompson. He held several junior ministerial positions, notably as Under-Secretary of State for Commonwealth Relations. As of 2008 the title is held by his son, the second Baronet, who succeeded in 1999.

The Thompson Baronetcy, of Walton-on-the-Hill in the City of Liverpool, was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom on 29 January 1963 for the Conservative politician Kenneth Thompson. He was Chairman of the Merseyside County Council and represented Liverpool, Walton in the House of Commons. As of 2008 the title is held by his son, the second Baronet, who succeeded in 1984.

Thompson baronets, of Haversham (1673)

Thompson baronets, of Virkees (1797)

Thompson baronets, of Hartsbourne Manor (1806)

The heir apparent to the baronetcy is Thomas Boulden Cameron Thompson (born 2006), only son of the 6th Baronet.

Thompson baronets, of Park Gate (1890)

The heir apparent to the baronetcy is Peile Richard Thompson (born 1975), only son of the 6th Baronet.

Thompson baronets, of Wimpole Street (1899)

Thompson baronets, of Reculver (1963)

The heir apparent to the baronetcy is Simon William Thompson (born 1985), eldest son of the 2nd Baronet.

Thompson baronets, of Walton-on-the-Hill (1963)

The heir apparent to the baronetcy is Richard Kenneth Spencer Thompson (born 1976), eldest son of the 2nd Baronet.

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