Thorella

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Thorella may refer to:

Caropsis verticillatoinundata is a species of flowering plant in the Apiaceae, the only member of the genus Caropsis. It is endemic to Western Europe and Southwestern Europe.

Hippolytidae family of crustaceans

Hippolytidae is a family of cleaner shrimp, also known as broken-back shrimp or anemone shrimp. The term "broken-back shrimp" also applies to the genus Hippolyte in particular and "cleaner shrimp" is sometimes applied exclusively to Lysmata amboinensis.

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Caridea infraorder of shrimp

The Caridea, commonly known as caridean shrimp, are an infraorder of shrimp within the order Decapoda. They are found widely around the world in both fresh and salt water.

Mantis shrimp order of crustaceans

Mantis shrimps, or stomatopods, are marine crustaceans of the order Stomatopoda. Some species have specialised calcified "clubs" that can strike with great power, while others have sharp forelimbs used to capture prey. They branched from other members of the class Malacostraca around 400 million years ago. Mantis shrimps typically grow to around 10 cm (3.9 in) in length. A few can reach up to 38 cm (15 in). The largest mantis shrimp ever caught had a length of 46 cm (18 in) and was caught in the Indian River near Fort Pierce, Florida, in the United States. A mantis shrimp's carapace covers only the rear part of the head and the first four segments of the thorax. Varieties range from shades of brown to vivid colors, as more than 450 species of mantis shrimps are known. They are among the most important predators in many shallow, tropical and subtropical marine habitats. However, despite being common, they are poorly understood, as many species spend most of their lives tucked away in burrows and holes.

Sea-Monkeys brine shrimp sold as pets

Sea-Monkeys are a hybrid version of brine shrimp—a group of crustaceans that undergo cryptobiosis. Sea Monkeys are scientifically classified as Artemia NYOS, while brine shrimp are classified as Artemia salina. Sea Monkeys are sold in hatching kits as novelty aquarium pets. Developed in the United States in 1957, at this point being just part of the Artemia salina species, by Harold von Braunhut, the product was heavily marketed, especially in comic books, and remains a presence in popular culture.

Brine shrimp genus of crustaceans

Artemia is a genus of aquatic crustaceans also known as brine shrimp. Artemia, the only genus in the family Artemiidae, has changed little externally since the Triassic period. The first historical record of the existence of Artemia dates back to the first half of the 10th century AD from Urmia Lake, Iran, with an example called by an Iranian geographer an "aquatic dog", although the first unambiguous record is the report and drawings made by Schlösser in 1757 of animals from Lymington, England. Artemia populations are found worldwide in inland saltwater lakes, but not in oceans. Artemia are able to avoid cohabiting with most types of predators, such as fish, by their ability to live in waters of very high salinity.

Scampi British food made from shrimp

Scampi, also called Dublin Bay Prawn, or Norway Lobster,, is an edible lobster of the order Decapoda. It is widespread in the Mediterranean and northeastern Atlantic, from North Africa to Norway and Iceland, and is a gastronomic delicacy. Scampi is now the only extant species in the genus Nephrops, after several other species were moved to the closely related genus Metanephrops.

Clam shrimp suborder of arthropods

Clam shrimp are a taxon of bivalved branchiopod crustaceans that resemble the unrelated bivalved molluscs. They are extant, and known from the fossil record, from at least the Devonian period and perhaps before. They were originally classified in a single order Conchostraca, which later proved to be paraphyletic, being separated into three different orders: Cyclestherida, Laevicaudata, and Spinicaudata.

Shrimp fishery

The shrimp fishery is a major global industry, with more than 3.4 million tons caught per year, chiefly in Asia. Rates of bycatch are unusually high for shrimp fishing, with the capture of sea turtles being especially contentious.

Alpheidae family of crustaceans

Alpheidae is a family of caridean snapping shrimp characterized by having asymmetrical claws, the larger of which is typically capable of producing a loud snapping sound. Other common names for animals in the group are pistol shrimp or alpheid shrimp.

Yellowhead disease (YHD) is a viral infection of shrimp and prawn, in particular of the giant tiger prawn, one of the two major species of farmed shrimp. The disease is highly lethal and contagious, killing shrimp quickly. Outbreaks of this disease have wiped out in a matter of days the entire populations of many shrimp farms that cultivated P. monodon, i.e. particularly Southeast Asian farms. In Thai, the disease is called hua leung.

White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is the lone virus of the genus Whispovirus, which is the only genus in the family Nimaviridae. It is responsible for causing white spot syndrome in a wide range of crustacean hosts. White spot syndrome (WSS) is a viral infection of penaeid shrimp. The disease is highly lethal and contagious, killing shrimp quickly. Outbreaks of this disease have wiped out the entire populations of many shrimp farms within a few days, in places throughout the world.

Cleaner shrimp

Cleaner shrimp is a common name for a number of swimming decapod crustaceans, that clean other organisms of parasites. They belong to any of three families, Hippolytidae, Palaemonidae, and Stenopodidae . The last of these families is more closely related to lobsters and crabs than it is to the remaining families. The term "cleaner shrimp" is sometimes used more specifically for the family Hippolytidae and the genus Lysmata.

Acetes is a genus of small shrimp that resemble krill, which is native throughout the seas of Asia. Several of its species are important for the production of shrimp paste in Southeast Asia, including Acetes japonicus, which is the world's most heavily fished species of wild shrimp or prawn in terms of total tonnage.

Algae eater, also called an algivore, is a common name for many bottom-dwelling or algae-eating species that feed on algae. Algae eaters are important for the fishkeeping hobby and many are commonly kept by hobbyists. Some of the common and most popular freshwater algae eaters in aquariums include:

Circumboreal Region

The Circumboreal Region in phytogeography is a floristic region within the Holarctic Kingdom in Eurasia and North America, as delineated by such geobotanists as Josias Braun-Blanquet and Armen Takhtajan.

Shrimp Decapod crustaceans

The term shrimp is used to refer to some decapod crustaceans, although the exact animals covered can vary. Used broadly, shrimp may cover any of the groups with elongated bodies and a primarily swimming mode of locomotion – most commonly Caridea and Dendrobranchiata. In some fields, however, the term is used more narrowly and may be restricted to Caridea, to smaller species of either group or to only the marine species. Under the broader definition, shrimp may be synonymous with prawn, covering stalk-eyed swimming crustaceans with long narrow muscular tails (abdomens), long whiskers (antennae), and slender legs. Any small crustacean which resembles a shrimp tends to be called one. They swim forward by paddling with swimmerets on the underside of their abdomens, although their escape response is typically repeated flicks with the tail driving them backwards very quickly. Crabs and lobsters have strong walking legs, whereas shrimp have thin, fragile legs which they use primarily for perching.

Prawn Common name applied to large swimming crustaceans

Prawn is a common name for small aquatic crustaceans with an exoskeleton and ten legs, some of which can be eaten.

<i>Synalpheus pinkfloydi</i> species of snapping shrimp, named after Pink Floyd

Synalpheus pinkfloydi, the Pink Floyd pistol shrimp, is a species of snapping shrimp in the genus Synalpheus. Described in 2017, it was named after the rock band Pink Floyd, in part because it has a distinctive "bright pink-red claw". The sound it makes by snapping the claw shut reaches 210 decibels, and can kill nearby small fish.

Feeder shrimp, ghost shrimp or glass shrimp are generic names applied to inexpensive small, semi-transparent shrimps commonly sold and fed as live prey to larger more aggressive fishes kept in aquariums.